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2700k vs 3770k?

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March 14, 2013 4:47:22 PM

So I'm making a new gaming pc and the reason why im taking i7 is because I'm going to split it in 2 workstations...(2 sapphire hd 7870xt) I'm leaning towards to 2700k because its 60$ cheaper but i heard about something called quicksync but i cant find out what it is. And how much would i need to OC 2700k to get 3770k speed?

More about : 2700k 3770k

March 14, 2013 4:51:27 PM

Just get the 3770K and call it a day. You can get that to 4.4GHz and to match it you will have to get the 2700K at 4.7GHz. So 3770K it is for you.
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March 14, 2013 4:58:14 PM

well its 60$ more expensive that why I'm leaning to 2700k, and how much should I OC it to get 3770k performance at stock?
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March 14, 2013 5:09:13 PM

There's not much difference in performance between the two, and I agree with you 60$ is a big difference so I would go for the 2700K. The main advantage for the 3770K over the 2700K is that it has better integrated graphics, but since you'll get Radeons 7870XT that will be totally useless.

So if I understand well you will be building 2 workstations? Both of them with a i7 + 7870XT each? And when you say workstation what type of work are you going to do? Because you know the only advantage an i7 has over the i5 is hyper-threading and not every software support that. In some scenario, it can even have a negative impact on some software. For instance, for Matlab they recommend deactivating hyper-threading in the BIOS so might as well go with an i5 in this case. Same thing for gaming, hyper-threading is useless this is why most gamers get i5-2500K or i5-3570K. If you tell us what software you'll be using on those workstations we could tell you if it's worth going with an i5 or i7.
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March 14, 2013 5:35:27 PM

I have both. The difference is absolutely nothing. What everyone says about the relative performance is true: you can overclock the 2700k more but the 3770K runs slightly faster at a given clockspeed.

My 2700K runs at 4.84GHz (all cores) while my 3770K runs at 4.74GHz (all cores). The performance in Cinebench at these max clocks is exactly the same.

Both have quicksync. If quicksync is important to you, this would favour the 3770K as it has a better integrated graphics processor. I should warn you however, that getting quicksync to work properly is a bit fiddly and there's very little software out there that uses it.

If it's gaming you want do, you will see no difference at all between the two processors. The bottleneck will always be the GPU. Actually, for gaming, the i5 is a better bet. It is as fast as the i7 (for gaming) and a lot cheaper.
March 14, 2013 5:44:33 PM

You didn't understand, I will split this pc in to 2 workstations using a software called Userful Multiplatform (This is with what I have came up now...) userful.com/products/overview
And maybe I should wait till June for Haswell since it isn't far anymore? I will buy the pc next month anyway...
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March 14, 2013 6:21:49 PM

Miks1890 said:
You didn't understand, I will split this pc in to 2 workstations using a software called Userful Multiplatform (This is with what I have came up now...) userful.com/products/overview
And maybe I should wait till June for Haswell since it isn't far anymore? I will buy the pc next month anyway...


OK I understand now, it's a virtualized environment and you'll run 2 virtual machines on it?

However, based on the research I made on the web it is still unclear if virtual environments really benefit from hyper-threading. There seems to be an ongoing debate between IT professionals on that matter and some of them report some small performance benefits, while others claim it has degraded performance when activated. I guess this greatly depends on hardware and software platforms as there are so many different virtual environments, but the bottom line is that hyper-threading doesn't seem to make a huge difference for virtual PCs at the end of the day, whether positive or negative.

Based on the Userful Multiplatform requirements, they claim that for only 2 stations, only a dual-core and 2 GB of RAM is required, see for yourself:

http://support.userful.com/wiki/index.php/Manuals/Syste...

They recommend an i7 only for 20 stations or more, and they don't talk about hyper-threading at all, so it is still unclear if Userful Multiplatform takes advantage of it or not.

In any case, if you are on a tight budget, I would recommend you get an i5-3570K instead (it cost 120$ less than the i7 and performs really close to it) it's a much better bang for the bucks IMHO:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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March 14, 2013 6:46:44 PM

Sandy Bridge> Ivy Bridge the i7 2700k will OC to 5.0Ghz and smoke everything plain and simple and without burning you house down! An NH-D14 or an H100 is sufficient for this. You will be lucky to get 4.6Ghz from the i7 3770k, and if so prime load will hit around 90c!
March 15, 2013 9:18:15 AM

MC_K7 said:
Miks1890 said:
You didn't understand, I will split this pc in to 2 workstations using a software called Userful Multiplatform (This is with what I have came up now...) userful.com/products/overview
And maybe I should wait till June for Haswell since it isn't far anymore? I will buy the pc next month anyway...


OK I understand now, it's a virtualized environment and you'll run 2 virtual machines on it?

However, based on the research I made on the web it is still unclear if virtual environments really benefit from hyper-threading. There seems to be an ongoing debate between IT professionals on that matter and some of them report some small performance benefits, while others claim it has degraded performance when activated. I guess this greatly depends on hardware and software platforms as there are so many different virtual environments, but the bottom line is that hyper-threading doesn't seem to make a huge difference for virtual PCs at the end of the day, whether positive or negative.

Based on the Userful Multiplatform requirements, they claim that for only 2 stations, only a dual-core and 2 GB of RAM is required, see for yourself:

http://support.userful.com/wiki/index.php/Manuals/Syste...

They recommend an i7 only for 20 stations or more, and they don't talk about hyper-threading at all, so it is still unclear if Userful Multiplatform takes advantage of it or not.

In any case, if you are on a tight budget, I would recommend you get an i5-3570K instead (it cost 120$ less than the i7 and performs really close to it) it's a much better bang for the bucks IMHO:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Well i found SoftXPand and it looked pretty good and you can even play games on both with having performance issues...

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March 15, 2013 12:23:38 PM
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Miks1890 said:
well its 60$ more expensive that why I'm leaning to 2700k, and how much should I OC it to get 3770k performance at stock?


If that's the case then definitely the i5-2700k.

Assuming the same clockspeed, Ivy Bridge CPUs are on average 6% more powerful than Sandy Bridge CPUs. Both i7-2700k and i7-3770k have the same clockspeed. So that basically means buying Ivy Bridge will cost you an extra $10 for every 1% of additional performance.

The main feature that you will miss out on if you elect to go with the i7-2700k is the lack of PCI-e 3.0 support. However, current graphic cards are not limited by the PCI-e 2.0 slot. Also, graphics cards probably will not really need to use the PCI-e 3.0 bandwidth until the Radeon HD 9000 / GeForce GTX 800 series are released... And that likely only applies to the really high end card like the HD 9950 or GTX 880 cards and above.

If you are the type of person who buys $500+ graphic cards and you want to keep the CPU + mobo for a while, then just get Ivy Bridge. Otherwise, go with Sandy Bridge.
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