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Seeking final advice before I proceed on my first Desktop Build. Input appreciated!

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  • Desktops
  • Build
  • Components
Last response: in Components
March 20, 2013 7:10:11 AM

Thanks in advance for reading this. I'm new to building desktops, but I feel I know what I want/need. Whether or not what I've picked out will do that for me, or if they are compatible pieces to each other is another question.

I am not building this as a gaming desktop. I'm building this desktop for my wife and I to play games that only require enough oompf for Sims 3 and maybe the new SimCity. On the other hand, I intend to do a lot of Premiere Pro and After Effects for video editing. Finally, I'm on a low budget because I'm still in college and we have a wonderful young son to care for. I'm hoping to put together a desktop that meets our needs, can be upgraded over time, and will be reliable. So this is what I've come up with to accomplish that and I'd love your opinion (opinions already received have been extremely helpful):

Case: Diablotek CPA-6170 EVO ATX
OS: Windows 8, 64-bit
MOBO: ASUS P8H77-V LE
PSU: CORSAIR Builder Series CX430 430W
Processor: Intel Core i5-3470 Ivy Bridge 3.2GHz
RAM: Kingston HyperX Blu Red Series 8GB
HDD: WD Green WD5000AZRX 500GB
Optical Drive: ASUS DVD Burner
Video Card: GeForce 9800 GT Video Card (chosen for price, reviews, and Adobe recommends the CUDA technology)
Multi-card Reader: Sabrent CRW-UINB 7-Slot
Wireless Card: TP-Link TL-WN781ND

Thanks!

(Yes I know the case is Mid-Tower, I'm okay with that)


More about : seeking final advice proceed desktop build input appreciated

March 20, 2013 7:33:10 AM

you can save some money on the motherboard by downgrading from z77 chipset to a z75 chipset as you have picked a not unlocked processor
for power supply I would not go lower than 500watts
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Best solution

March 20, 2013 7:37:57 AM

alvine said:
you can save some money on the motherboard by downgrading from z77 chipset to a z75 chipset as you have picked a not unlocked processor
for power supply I would not go lower than 500watts


No OP has picked up H77 chipset which is fine for that CPU.

Case: Diablotek CPA-6170 EVO ATX
OS: Windows 8, 64-bit
MOBO: ASUS P8H77-V LE
PSU: CORSAIR Builder Series CX430 430W
Processor: Intel Core i5-3470 Ivy Bridge 3.2GHz
RAM: Kingston HyperX Blu Red Series 8GB
HDD: WD Green WD5000AZRX 500GB
Optical Drive: ASUS DVD Burner
Video Card: GeForce 9800 GT Video Card (chosen for price, reviews, and Adobe recommends the CUDA technology)
Multi-card Reader: Sabrent CRW-UINB 7-Slot
Wireless Card: TP-Link TL-WN781ND said:
Case: Diablotek CPA-6170 EVO ATX
OS: Windows 8, 64-bit
MOBO: ASUS P8H77-V LE
PSU: CORSAIR Builder Series CX430 430W
Processor: Intel Core i5-3470 Ivy Bridge 3.2GHz
RAM: Kingston HyperX Blu Red Series 8GB
HDD: WD Green WD5000AZRX 500GB
Optical Drive: ASUS DVD Burner
Video Card: GeForce 9800 GT Video Card (chosen for price, reviews, and Adobe recommends the CUDA technology)
Multi-card Reader: Sabrent CRW-UINB 7-Slot
Wireless Card: TP-Link TL-WN781ND


A CX500 or XFX 550 watt just to be safer :) 

Looks good to me.
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March 20, 2013 8:00:08 AM

For a system using a single GeForce 9800 GT graphics card NVIDIA specifies a minimum of a 400 Watt or greater system power supply that has a maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 26 Amps or greater and that has at least one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors.

Total Power Supply Wattage is NOT the crucial factor in power supply selection!!! Sufficient Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) rated at 45°C - 50°C ambient temperature, is the most critical factor.

Overclocking of the CPU and/or GPU(s) will require an additional increase to the maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current ratings, recommended above, to meet the increase in power required for the overclock. The additional amount required will depend on the magnitude of the overclock being attempted.

The Corsair Builder Series CX430 (SKU# CP-9020046), with its maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 32 Amps and with one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors, is sufficient to power your system configuration with a single GeForce 9800 GT graphics card.

Your choice of power supply is fine.
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March 20, 2013 12:30:58 PM

So I guess the consensus is that what I have is okay then, eh? I do indeed have the H77, not the Z77 since I'm not planning on overclocking. And the minimum PSU requirement for the graphics card is 350 Watt according to what's listed on the specifications of EVGA GeForce 9800 GT. So I should be okay then, right? I chose many items based on what I'll need, but also energy efficiency, i.e. the HDD, so I'm hoping i don't use up a ton of energy and end up running quite cool.
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March 20, 2013 2:24:44 PM

It's not the PSU's total Wattage that matters.

In a modern system the majority of the power is drawn from the +12 Volt rail(s) so that is the specification that really matters.
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