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I just need opinions as to whether or not this is a decent compatible build that'll work for the next generation.

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March 20, 2013 10:58:51 AM

So basically here's my build I have developed on Cyberpower's website.
Case: Thermaltake Chaser MK-1 Full Tower Gaming Case W/ Side Panel Window
Laser Engraving: None
Neon Light Upgrade: 12in Cold Cathode Neon Light (Blue Color)
Extra Case Fan Upgrade: Maximum Enermax 120MM Case Cooling Fans for selected case (Maximum Silent Operation) (500-1,200 RPM T.B. Silence Black Color with Blue LED Twister Bearing 8-14 dBA)
Noise Reduction Technology: Anti-Vibration Fan Mounts
CPU: Intel® Core™ i7-3930K Six-Core 3.20 GHz 12MB Intel Smart Cache LGA2011 (All Venom OC Certified)
Freebies: None
Performance Tuning Protection Plan by Intel: Intel® Core™ i7-3930K Performance Tuning Protection Plan by Intel
Venom Boost Fast And Efficient Factory Overclocking: Pro OC (Performance Overclock 10% or more)
Cooling Fan: Asetek 570LX Liquid Cooling system w/ 240MM Radiator and Dual Fans (Extreme Overclocking Performance + Extreme Silent at 20dBA)
Coolant for Cyberpower Xtreme Hydro Water Cooling Kits: Standard Coolant
Motherboard: (SLI/CrossFireX Support) ASUS Sabertooth X79 Intel X79 Chipset Quad Channel DDR3 ATX w/ TUF Armor, SSD Caching, 7.1 HD Audio, Intel GbLAN, 3 Gen3 PCIe X16, 2 PCIe X1 & 1 PCI
Freebies: None
Memory: 16GB (4GBx4) DDR3/2133MHz Quad Channel Memory (G.SKILL Ripjaws X)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 690 4GB 16X PCIe 3.0 Dual GPU Video Card (Major Brand Powered by NVIDIA)
Freebies: FREE $150 Value In-Game Hawken, Planetside 2 and World of Tanks w/ NVIDIA GTX 660 or Above
Video Card 2: None
Freebies: None
Video Card 3: None
Video Capture Card: None
Power Supply Upgrade: 1,000 Watts - LEPA G1000-MA 80 Plus Gold Certified Modular Power Supply
Hard Drive: 120 GB SAMSUNG 840 Series SATA-III 6.0Gb/s SSD - 530MB/s Read & 130MB/s Write (Single Drive)
Data Hard Drive: 2TB (2TBx1) SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 64MB Cache 7200RPM HDD (Single Drive)
Hard Drive Cooling Fan: None
External Hard Drive (USB3.0/2.0/eSATA): None
USB Flash Drive: None
Optical Drive: LG 12X Internal Blu-ray Drive & DVDRW, 3D Playback Combo Drive (BLACK COLOR)
Optical Drive 2: None
Sound: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO
3D Vision Glasses: None
LCD Monitor: None
2nd Monitor: None
3rd Monitor: None
Speakers: None
Network: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network
Keyboard: AZZA Multimedia USB Gaming Keyboard
Mouse: AZZA Optical 1600dpi Gaming Mouse with Weight Adjustable Cartridge
Mouse Pad: None
Headset: None
Gaming Gear: None
Extra Thermal Display: NZXT Sentry-2 Fan Touch Screen Fan Control & Temperature Display
Wireless 802.11B/G Network Card: 802.11b/g/n 300Mbps PCI Wireless Adapter Network Card
External Wireless Network Card: None
Wireless 802.11 B/G/N Access Point: None
Bluetooth: None
Flash Media Reader/Writer: All-in-One External USB 2.0 Card Reader/Writer (Black Color)
Video Camera: None
Tablet: None
Cable: None
Power Protection: None
IEEE1394 Card: None
Internal USB Port: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports
USB Port: None
Operating System: Microsoft® Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit Edition)
Media Center Remote Control & TV Tuner: None
Office Suite: None
Games: None
Ultra Care Option: Ultra Enhanced Packaging Solution - Protect Your Dream System During Transit, and more(2)
Service: STANDARD WARRANTY: 3-YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY PLUS LIFE-TIME TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Rush Service: NO; READY TO SHIP IN 5~10 BUSINESS DAYS

I get some of the stuff seems a bit of an overkill when you look at certain components, but I am not trying to hold back too much seeing as there is another generation of games coming pretty soon. If someone could just give me some advice I would greatly appreciate it. And also one other thing, I have researched a lot and reviewed and changed my build mutiple times, but like they say better safe than sorry. Thanks.
March 20, 2013 11:00:41 AM

Are you solely gaming on this computer? What's the budget, and is cyberpower building it?
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March 20, 2013 11:07:50 AM

2wenty said:
Are you solely gaming on this computer? What's the budget, and is cyberpower building it?


Well the thing is I am a student in Game art at the moment, and I am basically trying to build a stable computer that can easily play games at their highest settings and also have the machine able to run 3-D rendering software as well. So basically an all around computer that could get me by a few years. My budget isn't that strict, but I am trying to stay under 3,500 if that's possible, maybe a little closer to 3,000. And yes I am planning on Cyberpower to build it.
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March 20, 2013 11:15:04 AM

To complete the build, you should get either a USB or SATA cash incinerator.

Seriously, get at 3570K and GTX 670, and put the $1500 difference in the bank. In 2-3 years when some new game comes out that won't run on that system, buy the future equivalent of a 3570K and GTX 670. You'll have a better system in 2-3 years and you'll still have $800-$1000 in the bank.
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March 20, 2013 11:19:13 AM

"Well the thing is I am a student in Game art... my budget isn't that strict..."

Aaaaaah, parents' money. In that case, get two 690's and SLI them.

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March 20, 2013 11:37:44 AM

"Aaaaaah, parents' money. In that case, get two 690's and SLI them."

[/quotemsg]
Yeah kind of a mix between both me and my parents, mostly me though since I'm only getting $750 from my old man and the rest is up to me. Anyway the thing is, I would get two 690's and SLi them but the price of those two will run upwards of 4,000+ with everything I have there. The main reason I chose that CPU is really for security in knowing that there will be games or even software that demand more CPU speed and usage, so I thought why not pick a CPU that really doesn't use all of it's power on current software and basically save myself from buying a newer and more expensive CPU again down the road. I'm actually trying really hard to future proof my system really, but maybe I'm wrong with the CPU thing.
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March 20, 2013 12:00:57 PM

Ignoring the overkill factor, I'll comment on the balance of your build. You should have at least a 240gb SSD. You should have two spinning HDDs in a RAID-1. The RAID-1 should be on a dedicated controller with battery backup cache (especially if you don't use a UPS). You should have a 1kw quality uninterrupted power supply (UPS) to prevent power outages that cause you grief and spikes that destroy components. Hopefully you are either running multiple monitors or something a lot higher than 1080, otherwise the 690 isn't justified. Gaming doesn't really justify the cost of the 3930k and its platform.

Not ignoring the overkill factor - I agree completely with truprecht. It is indeed way overkill. If its for gaming get an i5-3570k. Put the money in the bank for future upgrades. You simply aren't going to notice much difference in modern games where so much is dependent on the GPU. The CPU you chose isn't really going to have too much more longevity than the 3570k for gaming. An i5-3570k will last a very long time - especially when you consider that it can be OCed well-enough for additional longevity. The point is - the diff between an i5-3570k and a 3930k is minimal in games while the prices diffs are huge.

A 690 is nice and all, but what resolution are you gaming? Don't tell me 1080p. If you are doing multi-monitors then a couple 7970s in CrossFire is good. Or a couple 670s. Don't get me wrong, a 690 is very nice, but you pay a lot for it and should justify it with a high-res monitor or multi-monitors.

Some time in the future, when you notice a slow-down, you can get a new GPU (hell you could get a bunch of them) with the money you've saved. Anyway, don't waste money, get what you need and put the rest in the bank.
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March 20, 2013 12:28:55 PM

truprecht said:
To complete the build, you should get either a USB or SATA cash incinerator.

Nah, USB and SATA are much less efficient for cash incinerators. Haven't you heard of the new ones for the thunderbolt interface?
; )
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March 20, 2013 12:48:21 PM

larkspur said:
Ignoring the overkill factor, I'll comment on the balance of your build. You should have at least a 240gb SSD. You should have two spinning HDDs in a RAID-1. The RAID-1 should be on a dedicated controller with battery backup cache (especially if you don't use a UPS). You should have a 1kw quality uninterrupted power supply (UPS) to prevent power outages that cause you grief and spikes that destroy components. Hopefully you are either running multiple monitors or something a lot higher than 1080, otherwise the 690 isn't justified. Gaming doesn't really justify the cost of the 3930k and its platform.

Not ignoring the overkill factor - I agree completely with truprecht. It is indeed way overkill. If its for gaming get an i5-3570k. Put the money in the bank for future upgrades. You simply aren't going to notice much difference in modern games where so much is dependent on the GPU. The CPU you chose isn't really going to have too much more longevity than the 3570k for gaming. An i5-3570k will last a very long time - especially when you consider that it can be OCed well-enough for additional longevity. The point is - the diff between an i5-3570k and a 3930k is minimal in games while the prices diffs are huge.

A 690 is nice and all, but what resolution are you gaming? Don't tell me 1080p. If you are doing multi-monitors then a couple 7970s in CrossFire is good. Or a couple 670s. Don't get me wrong, a 690 is very nice, but you pay a lot for it and should justify it with a high-res monitor or multi-monitors.

Some time in the future, when you notice a slow-down, you can get a new GPU (hell you could get a bunch of them) with the money you've saved. Anyway, don't waste money, get what you need and put the rest in the bank.


So in short I should just go with components that would work for the "current gen" for say, and save money for additional upgrades that may be needed in the next 1-2 years? And I will actually be playing at 1920x1080. I really have no need to go real big with monitors, but I really want performance that'll last on a 1920x1080 resolution and have a lot of power to keep me from upgrading it constantly. I just thought a 690 would maybe help even though it is overkill for the res. I'm gonna use it on. Although I may upgrade to higher resolutions sometime in the future, I am planning on staying with 1920x1080 for a while. I hope I'm not coming off as if I'm ignoring your suggestions, I really appreciate the help, don't get me wrong.... it's just that I really don't want to underpower my rig when all these "next-gen" games come out and I'm only able to run it on low/medium settings if I want a decent Framerate. I hope that makes sense.

P.S. This is my first actual build, but I have been researching for a few months on some computer components and their capabilities.
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March 20, 2013 1:08:55 PM

A 690 performs similarly to two 680s in SLI. It is very powerful and will run 1080p for a long time. It is an "elegant" solution since cramming two graphics cards into one case and motherboard can be problematic. It's cooling is very well-designed. It's fine to get one for 1080p with the intention of using it for more than two years. The problem is, the latest and greatest will always be right around the corner and spending $1000 on a graphics card is usually justified by more than just three years use. For one third the price you can get a great card that will run 1080p great now and when it doesn't, you upgrade to the newest technology. You won't necessarily have to change your CPU/mobo to upgrade your GPU.

The i5-3570k and the LGA1155 platform even without an overclock is perfectly capable of running any game today and in the next couple and probably three years driving a 690. You can always OC it a bit and see if it makes a difference. The 3930k and the LGA2011 platform is a workstation-class solution that despite having awesome multi-threaded performance shares similar performance to the 3570k (or 3770k) in games. Sure, it's more powerful. Sure you get a few extra fps depending on the game and resolution. But games today (and tomorrow) are heavily-reliant on the GPU. The CPU is still important, it must be able to properly support the GPU(s). But like I said, a 3570k will support the newest, latest and greatest GPUs for years to come. A 690 is no problem for a 3570k. And that's without OCing.
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March 20, 2013 1:16:24 PM

UE4 is running on a single Keplar as of this time last year (670?) and still optimizing. You're sticking a 690 in there. You're set.
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March 20, 2013 1:27:17 PM

a 690 performs the same as 2 670s...

I would build the computer myself and add a watercooling loop for coolness factor if i could spend this much money.
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March 20, 2013 3:20:20 PM

Case: * Cooler Master Storm Trooper Full Tower Gaming Case w/ 200mm Fan, Integrated Fan Controller, Front USB 3.0 & X-Dock, and Easy Carry Handle
Laser Engraving: None
Neon Light Upgrade: 12in Cold Cathode Neon Light (Blue Color)
Extra Case Fan Upgrade: Maximum Enermax 120MM Case Cooling Fans for selected case (Maximum Silent Operation) (500-1,200 RPM T.B. Silence Black Color with Blue LED Twister Bearing 8-14 dBA)
Noise Reduction Technology: Anti-Vibration Fan Mounts
CPU: Intel® Core™ i7-3930K Six-Core 3.20 GHz 12MB Intel Smart Cache LGA2011 (All Venom OC Certified)
Freebies: None
Performance Tuning Protection Plan by Intel: None
Venom Boost Fast And Efficient Factory Overclocking: No Overclocking
Cooling Fan: Asetek 570LX Liquid Cooling system w/ 240MM Radiator and Dual Fans (Extreme Overclocking Performance + Extreme Silent at 20dBA)
Coolant for Cyberpower Xtreme Hydro Water Cooling Kits: Standard Coolant
Motherboard: (SLI/CrossFireX Support) ASUS Sabertooth X79 Intel X79 Chipset Quad Channel DDR3 ATX w/ TUF Armor, SSD Caching, 7.1 HD Audio, Intel GbLAN, 3 Gen3 PCIe X16, 2 PCIe X1 & 1 PCI
Freebies: None
Memory: 16GB (4GBx4) DDR3/1866MHz Quad Channel Memory (G.SKILL Ripjaws X)
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN 6GB 16X PCIe 3.0 Video Card (EVGA Superclocked)
Freebies: FREE $150 Value In-Game Hawken, Planetside 2 and World of Tanks w/ NVIDIA GTX 660 or Above
Video Card 2: None
Freebies: None
Video Card 3: None
Video Capture Card: None
Power Supply Upgrade: 1,000 Watts - LEPA G1000-MA 80 Plus Gold Certified Modular Power Supply
Hard Drive: 250 GB SAMSUNG 840 Series SATA-III 6.0Gb/s SSD - 540MB/s Read & 250MB/s Write (Single Drive)
Data Hard Drive: 1TB SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 32MB Cache 7200RPM HDD (Single Drive)
Hard Drive Cooling Fan: None
External Hard Drive (USB3.0/2.0/eSATA): None
USB Flash Drive: None
Optical Drive: LG 12X Internal Blu-ray Drive & DVDRW, 3D Playback Combo Drive (BLACK COLOR)
Optical Drive 2: None
Sound: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO
3D Vision Glasses: None
LCD Monitor: None
2nd Monitor: None
3rd Monitor: None
Speakers: None
Network: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network
Keyboard: AZZA Multimedia USB Gaming Keyboard
Mouse: AZZA Optical 1600dpi Gaming Mouse with Weight Adjustable Cartridge
Mouse Pad: None
Headset: None
Gaming Gear: None
Extra Thermal Display: NZXT Sentry-2 Fan Touch Screen Fan Control & Temperature Display
Wireless 802.11B/G Network Card: 802.11b/g/n 300Mbps PCI Wireless Adapter Network Card
External Wireless Network Card: None
Wireless 802.11 B/G/N Access Point: None
Bluetooth: None
Flash Media Reader/Writer: None
Video Camera: None
Tablet: None
Cable: None
Power Protection: None
IEEE1394 Card: None
Internal USB Port: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports
USB Port: None
Operating System: Microsoft® Windows 8 (64-bit Edition)
Media Center Remote Control & TV Tuner: None
Office Suite: None
Games: None
Ultra Care Option: Cooler Master Thermal Fusion 400 Extreme Performance CPU - Thermal Compound Optimized for Thermal Dissipation, and more(1)
Service: STANDARD WARRANTY: 3-YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY PLUS LIFE-TIME TECHNICAL SUPPORT
Rush Service: NO; READY TO SHIP IN 5~10 BUSINESS DAYS

Ok so I sort of updated it and I feel as though it's slightly better. Unless someone wants to take it into their own hands and basically pick some of the stuff out, here's the Configuration code for cyberpowerpc's website. (1EYU82)
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March 20, 2013 4:08:33 PM

Are you familiar with the concept of diminishing marginal return? Basically when it comes to computer performance the last 20% costs more than the first 80%. Meaning a $3600 computer is not 300% as powerful as a $1200 computer, it's only 30% more powerful.

Look at today's "best gaming CPU's for the money" article in Tom's. A 3570K has about 97% of the gaming performance of a 3930K for 40% of the price. That means spending an extra $340 on the CPU only gets you 3% performance improvement.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...

When it comes to the GPU, remember that a 60Hz monitor can only display 60FPS. Even if your GTX 690 can send 200 FPS to the monitor, the monitor can only display 60 of them so there's no perceptible performance difference between a $1000 GTX 690 and a $250 GTX 660ti at 1920x1080 in any game except maybe Crysis 3. A GTX 690 is only worthwhile for running multiple monitors or some kind of super-intensive video rendering/editing

So, paying $3600 now for a super-high-end "future proof" machine that doesn't need to be upgraded in 6 years will actually cost you significantly more and get you less performance over 6 years than buying a solid $1200 machine now and another solid $1200 machine in 3 years.

To use a car analogy, I understand if you would rather get a Porsche than a Nissan Z. In that case, get a 3770k and GTX 680. But that build - the GTX 690 in particular - is like buying two identical Porsches when you can only drive one at a time.

You're a student. Spend your money on wine, women, vacations or investments, not on imperceptible surplus frames per second. When you look back on your life I guarantee you'll never think "Damn, I wish I had played Crysis 3 on ultra-high detail and 8x AA instead of high detail and AA off."

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March 20, 2013 5:13:14 PM

truprecht said:
Are you familiar with the concept of diminishing marginal return? Basically when it comes to computer performance the last 20% costs more than the first 80%. Meaning a $3600 computer is not 300% as powerful as a $1200 computer, it's only 30% more powerful.

Look at today's "best gaming CPU's for the money" article in Tom's. A 3570K has about 97% of the gaming performance of a 3930K for 40% of the price. That means spending an extra $340 on the CPU only gets you 3% performance improvement.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...

When it comes to the GPU, remember that a 60Hz monitor can only display 60FPS. Even if your GTX 690 can send 200 FPS to the monitor, the monitor can only display 60 of them so there's no perceptible performance difference between a $1000 GTX 690 and a $250 GTX 660ti at 1920x1080 in any game except maybe Crysis 3. A GTX 690 is only worthwhile for running multiple monitors or some kind of super-intensive video rendering/editing

So, paying $3600 now for a super-high-end "future proof" machine that doesn't need to be upgraded in 6 years will actually cost you significantly more and get you less performance over 6 years than buying a solid $1200 machine now and another solid $1200 machine in 3 years.

To use a car analogy, I understand if you would rather get a Porsche than a Nissan Z. In that case, get a 3770k and GTX 680. But that build - the GTX 690 in particular - is like buying two identical Porsches when you can only drive one at a time.

You're a student. Spend your money on wine, women, vacations or investments, not on imperceptible surplus frames per second. When you look back on your life I guarantee you'll never think "Damn, I wish I had played Crysis 3 on ultra-high detail and 8x AA instead of high detail and AA off."



I totally get what you're saying, and I will take that to heart. I'm basically just needing this for gaming and also a lot of 3d rendering since I am a Game art and animations student. All I want is a computer that'll last me a pretty extended period of time and have pretty good FPS, I'm not asking for 200+ FPS I just want a reasonably priced gaming rig that will go through the next gen with minimal upgrades. and less hassling with all the maintenance required on PCs. I just got rid of some unnecessary things now and now it's about 2,890.
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