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I am completely lost; Need help building a system for Adobe CS6

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March 21, 2013 9:05:39 PM

I am starting to get a lot more clients, and my current PC isn't cutting the mustard when it comes to editing video.

The PC I want must be able to run premiere pro CS6 well. I am not tech savvy when it comes to building a computer but I want to so I can get the most bang for my buck.

I want to be able to take advantage of the GPU? feature with premiere, where the graphics card renders effects, I also want a RAID 0? setup where speed is king from what I understand ?

I do not completely understand all this obviously, but from what I have been reading it seems I need a SSD devoted to the OS and the software and then at least 2 HDDs

I am not understanding what the purpose of the other 2 HDDs are, where will the files be located? I do not understand what a scratch drive is/does? Do I need 3 HDDs? My current computer has about 700 or so GBs of HD space. But it is all tied up with family photos, videos, games, office, all in addition to the tons of space allocated to the videos I have shot. I am constantly having to delete things or move them around to external HDs so I can get the files from the days shoot and start editing, it is a real headache. My computer is probably 5 years old, and transferring from the cards takes forever I want to shoot myself. Plus rendering takes forever and it sucks have to constantly render the timeline to be able to even work at all in premiere.

I really only want to spend 1,000 but if it will really help performance I can shell out 1,300. I am really hoping that my budget is going to be enough to really get me what I need. I want to keep the machine dedicated to just using those programs, and surfing the web for business related stuff.

Another question would it be much more if I had a system that supported dual monitors? Would make my life happier.

Oh and thank you so much if you decide to help me, cuz I am drowning here! Life preserve please! Feel like I would have to spend a month 8 hours a day to even begin to understand WTF I am looking at when I look at http://pcpartpicker.com

Here is a list from adobe's website of what seems to be the minimum to run premiere CS6, I want above the minimum even above the recommended if my budget can support it

"System requirements
Windows

Intel® Core™2 Duo or AMD Phenom® II processor; 64-bit support required
Microsoft® Windows® 7 with Service Pack 1 and Windows® 8. Refer to the CS6 FAQ for more information about Windows 8 support.*
4GB of RAM (8GB recommended)
4GB of available hard-disk space for installation; additional free space required during installation (cannot install on removable flash storage devices)
Additional disk space required for preview files and other working files (10GB recommended)
1280x900 display
OpenGL 2.0–capable system
7200 RPM hard drive (multiple fast disk drives, preferably RAID 0 configured, recommended)
Sound card compatible with ASIO protocol or Microsoft Windows Driver Model
DVD-ROM drive compatible with dual-layer DVDs (DVD+-R burner for burning DVDs; Blu-ray burner for creating Blu-ray Disc media)
QuickTime 7.6.6 software required for QuickTime features
Optional: Adobe-certified GPU card for GPU-accelerated performance
This software will not operate without activation. Broadband Internet connection and registration are required for software activation, validation of subscriptions, and access to online services.* Phone activation is not available. "
March 21, 2013 10:17:48 PM

Erm... you wanna give us a budget? :p 

PCpartpicker is commonly used because it's easy... once you know what parts are what. Browse around newegg.com and read reviews to get a feel for what's what.

As for a system that supports dual monitors, basically anything with a graphics card will.

Now, the rest of your questions:

1) The other two hard drives are, in theory, to put in RAID 0. That means that they'll show up as one drive in windows, and data will be written and read between both of them, which means they have twice as long to accomplish each task and, in theory, will be twice as fast as a single drive. However, the way it works means that if one drive fails, the data is GONE.

2) In the simplest setup, you have your SSD (a hard drive that has no moving parts and is 10x as fast.) and your HDD. You would put windows and programs on the SSD and then, because it's small, store data on the hard drive.

3) A scratch drive is a second drive, usually a SSD, that's used ONLY to store the current project you're working on. So you'd take the files for your video editing project and move them to the SSD so that premiere or whatever can access them way faster - it makes working on the data MUCH smoother. Then when you're done with the project, you save it and copy the data back to your storage drive.

4) You don't really need 3 hard drives, no. What I'd likely do is get a 128GB SSD for windows and programs, a 64GB SSD to use as a scratch drive, and a 2TB drive to use as storage - then you can use those external HDs for backups and archiving. If you want your data drive to be faster, which you probably wouldn't need with a scratch drive, you could get a pair of 1TB or 2TB hard drives. (But you have twice the chance that a drive will fail and you'll lose your data.)

5) Alright, here's a build for you based on your needs:
(You could spend $20 on an aftermarket CPU cooler and make it quieter, and you could buy a PCI wifi card if you need wifi.)

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($82.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($112.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($152.49 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($115.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial M4 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($80.51 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 650 1GB Video Card ($99.99 @ Microcenter)
Case: BitFenix Shinobi ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Corsair CX 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($66.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-224BB DVD/CD Writer ($15.98 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1147.44
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-03-22 01:17 EDT-0400)
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March 22, 2013 12:12:50 PM

He did state a budget. Just to simplify the storage and save some money with larger capacity, just go with a bigger ssd for os, programs, working files and the hdd for storage. A scratch disk does not mean a dedicated drive but rather the location of scratch files.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1230 V2 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($235.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: ASRock B75 PRO3 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($75.06 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($93.50 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 660 2GB Video Card ($203.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 450W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($52.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $971.48
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-03-22 15:12 EDT-0400)
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March 22, 2013 1:00:36 PM

k1114 said:
He did state a budget. Just to simplify the storage and save some money with larger capacity, just go with a bigger ssd for os, programs, working files and the hdd for storage. A scratch disk does not mean a dedicated drive but rather the location of scratch files.


Fair 'nough. I just personally prefer to have a dedicated drive / partition to help keep track of things.
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March 27, 2013 1:36:11 PM

Heres some benchmarking sites for premiere pro/after effects. You can check some builds and see how much faster different things make them. The main thing I think is having a cuda gpu. It is like 13x faster than cpu only. But another thing people always forget is having multiple hard drives, some for scratch disks (raid array or ssd scratch disks are faster), some page files, media drives, os, exports, and then a couple of other things. Harm milaard at adobe forums made a great post about hard drives (google it i forget the name of the thread).

But anyways
http://ppbm5.com/MPE%20Charts.php
http://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/PremiereCS5....
http://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/AfterEffects...

I have a gtx 660 ti running in a crappy old 1 hard drive prebuilt dell xps with a phenom ii x4 at 2.8ghz and 16gb ram and its still super fast. The gpu made it infinteily faster. Now I dont have to render the timeline, I can have mutliple effects on at once (like some levels curves blur sharpen crop color correction) and adjust them while its playing in real time smoothly
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