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Can't Decide on GPU, CPU or SSD. Need Input.

Last response: in Systems
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March 25, 2013 8:33:20 PM

Microcenter has the i7 3770k for $229 vs. the i5 3570k for $189. Is the i7 Hyperthreading technology worth $40 more? Of course, it will have better results and everything, but will I notice this when working on programs like AutoCAD, Solidworks, or MATLAB? How about gaming, will I need to "disable" hyperthreading when gaming?

I'm having the problem of finding a graphics card, as the one that I continuously want repeatedly goes out of stock before I can get there. What I essentially want from my card is to be able to run 2 monitors for work and a single monitor for gaming is fine for me. I would like HDMI and I would like it to be the 7870s because it comes with two AAA titles (Tomb Raider and Bioshock). But I really don't know which card to get.

People recommend MSI Twin Frozr technology, but I can't find it on Newegg or Microcenter (The two places I really would like to purchase from for shipping reasons). The ASUS card seems fine, but I don't know how it compares to the SAPPIRE or XFX. I know XFX has the Lifetime warranty, but I don't want a Lifetime warranty on a mediocre graphics card.

Please help me decide on my i5 or i7 processor as well as my graphics card. I just want to build my computer already.

OH! and for an SSD. I found that the Samsung 840 Pros are pretty much the business, but they are costly. The regular 840 series is significantly cheaper, and I may be able to splurge for more memory. Which reminds me, will 128 GB be enough for a boot drive? It will just hold my work programs (I assume 3 programs total), the OS, and a recent game or two. But then there's the OCZ Vector which is comparable to the 840 Pro and comes with Far Cry 3. Which would you go with?
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March 25, 2013 8:53:15 PM

if you have more the 2 cores hyper-threading doesn't help in gaming...though yes it will help in your cad stuff and should be noticeable.
as for the ssd get the 840 pros...the reg 840 lack some features that will extend disk life and since it sounds like a workstation + gaming i would just spend the extra dough there (unless gettinf far cry is a huge thing...ocz isn't bad). 128 is enough for a boot drive yes. as for you GPU issue yes the twin frorz is great but any of those cards will work i suggest getting the one with the highest clocks for the best performance.
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March 25, 2013 9:00:51 PM

For rendering jobs like AutoCAD the 3770k may be worth the extra money, if it isn't too much out of your way.
And hyperthreading only comes into play for applications that utilize more than four cores (or a lot of multi-tasking). But you shouldn't need to disable it for any reason as it won't reduce gaming performance. It basically takes a roughly 10% overhead from the physical cores (from what I've seen) when they're maxed to produce virtual cores to handle additional threads.

As far as graphics cards, the model tends to be more important than the manufacturer. All of them should run pretty well, so it's just about which features you prefer the most. Sapphire seems to have the best reputation, so I'd recommend that or the ASUS card. From what I've seen XFX can go either way, so it wouldn't be my first choice unless you really like the design.

128gb is usually more than enough for a boot drive, but it depends on what you do. For me, a full Win 7/8 install with all of my programs (quite a bit--Office, Adobe Suite, etc.) usually takes up 50-60gbs. Personally, I would go with an 840 pro if you can afford it, but if you need the memory (have less than 8gb ram) then the standard 840 isn't a bad option.

Don't know much about the OCZs since they used to have a bad firmware problem. Heard that was fixed, but haven't tried them yet. If you want FC3, AMD may still have a card that ships with that free. Their higher end cards are shipping with Bioshock Infinite and Tomb Raider right now, so you may want to look at that as well.
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March 25, 2013 9:01:20 PM

Hyper-Threading for gaming = Useless

For 40 dollars more though, get the i7, it will help in things like you mentioned.

This card: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

120GB is enough for a boot drive and all your applications.

This drive is plenty for you:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Corsair also makes good reliable drives too if your interested in them.

I wouldn't trust OCZ in the slightest, I buy a lot of stuff, and they seem to have the most unreliable products I've used.
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March 25, 2013 9:12:40 PM

Why not the i7 3770K you may ask? Well the i7 3770K merely adds Hyper-Threading and a higher clock speed to the equation. Though these two improvements are fantastic in CPU intensive tasks such as video encoding and 3D modeling, in gaming scenarios it doesn’t really do a whole lot. Games these days are much more graphics intensive than CPU intensive, so it’s a much better idea to invest the extra dough into the graphics card.

That said, if you are looking to do live streaming or other tasks which require any sort of video encoding, feel free to pick up an Intel Core i7 3770K instead. Memory – 8GB Corsair Vengeance 1600MHz DDR3 Low Profile 1.5v We’re talking about fast, reliable, and cost effective memory backed up with Corsair’s legendary warranty,and it’s also got low profile heatspreaders as well, which is much more versatile for those looking to outfit the CPU with a powerful air cooler in the future.GPU - http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Consider getting a 7870 LE. Very close performance to the 7950. It's essentially the same card but with disabled shaders and memory.Nowadays, I think every PC should include an SSD period. They’re waaaaaaaaay faster and they draw less energy, but unfortunately they do cost a significant amount more than a traditional hard drive.

Those who have some extra budget laying around, I’d definitely suggest going with one.
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March 25, 2013 9:19:10 PM

either the MSI or the sappaire...both are equal.
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March 25, 2013 9:29:25 PM

so much agreement...cough

msi seems to be getting the most votes ;) 
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March 25, 2013 9:34:05 PM

atomicWAR said:
so much agreement...cough

msi seems to be getting the most votes ;) 
:lol:  Well i have two MSI 670 PE's and i love them before that i had a MSI 570 and loved it so i got to pick what i have had experience with. ;) 


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March 25, 2013 9:36:49 PM

bigcyco1 said:
atomicWAR said:
so much agreement...cough

msi seems to be getting the most votes ;) 
:lol:  Well i have two MSI 670 PE's and i love them before that i had a MSI 570 and loved it so i got to pick what i have had experience with. ;) 





heheh i have 2 msi twin frozr gtx 670.....great minds think alike ;) 
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March 25, 2013 9:40:44 PM

atomicWAR said:
bigcyco1 said:
atomicWAR said:
so much agreement...cough

msi seems to be getting the most votes ;) 
:lol:  Well i have two MSI 670 PE's and i love them before that i had a MSI 570 and loved it so i got to pick what i have had experience with. ;) 





heheh i have 2 msi twin frozr gtx 670.....great minds think alike ;) 
They sure do. :) 

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March 25, 2013 10:13:14 PM

It seems to have narrowed down to the MSI R7870-2GD5T/OC and the ASUS DirectCU II. I don't know if it matters much, but I do have the ASUS P8-Z77 LK motherboard, which supposedly has GPU boost. Will that be best matched with the ASUS, or will it really just not matter? Seems like the only downside with the MSI is that it isn't the TWIN FROZRs though.
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March 25, 2013 10:14:39 PM

Lol, it's just human nature to recommend what you use, everyone always recommends something different. :]

It won't make a difference.

When it comes down to a card from different manufactures, it's basically going to be a choice between the cooling methods and customer support/warranty. The performance will practically be the same.
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March 25, 2013 10:15:28 PM

go asus if you can't find a twin frozr...asus is my second choose on GPU cards as a general rule... and first for motherboards
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March 25, 2013 10:18:59 PM

atomicWAR said:
go asus if you can't find a twin frozr...asus is my second choose on GPU cards as a general rule... and first for motherboards
+1 i agree

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March 25, 2013 10:43:35 PM

All of those GPUs are good. Sapphire has a solid reputation but you would not have any problem with the other two either.

The i7 will help you alittle in things like Autocad with no significant performance decrease in games. No need to disable HT.

For SSDs:
I would get a Samsung 830 if you can. Otherwise go with a Crucial M4 or Samsung 840 in that order.
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March 27, 2013 1:31:44 AM

If I could find the MSI Hawk 7870 Twin Frozr IV, would everyone be in agreement with that? Anyone have any hidden stores to find it? Newegg doesn't have any 7870 Twin Frozr's.
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March 27, 2013 3:30:54 AM

The MSI Radeon HD 7870 HAWK is the MSI Lightning's smaller brother. It uses the company's signature Twin Frozr II dual-fan cooler. MSI has also increased the clock speeds of the HD 7870 HAWK to 1100 MHz GPU and 1200 MHz memory.I say go for it.
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March 27, 2013 5:49:37 AM

yeah i ahve had really good luck with all the twin frozr's i have owned over the years. should be a good card for you.
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