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Is my I5 3570k temperature normal? Is my stock frequency correct?

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March 26, 2013 11:06:18 AM

My BIOS are showing my temperatures bounce between 35-36 with my frequency at 3.8Ghz. Is this normal? I am using a Noctuna nh-d14 and I think maybe it should be cooler. This is the first thermal paste I have ever applied and seeing the common error of putting too much on, I think I may have put too little. Also, during BIOS is it normal for my frequency to be showing 3.8Ghz? I thought it would run at 3.4ghz and only go up to 3.8 ghz if the processor was had a high workload. (Which I was not expecting from the BIOS workload...)
March 26, 2013 11:13:05 AM

Are you running it with a lot of applications open or are you running it idle?
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March 26, 2013 11:14:57 AM

I have only loaded to BIOS. I have yet to install any drives, at all.
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March 26, 2013 11:22:45 AM

The thing is that with your fan, the CFM and the RPM of it are a little bit more on the low end. And for the price you paid, which was about $80 right?, you have been ripped off. If you have to order a new one, look at the Master Cooler Hyper 212 EVO. Its about $35 off of newegg and hes a great 600-2000 RPM and to about 85 CFM, which surprisingly enough, costs less than half of yours and has much better specs.

Fan: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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March 26, 2013 11:31:33 AM

Dotaholic said:
My BIOS are showing my temperatures bounce between 35-36 with my frequency at 3.8Ghz. Is this normal? I am using a Noctuna nh-d14 and I think maybe it should be cooler. This is the first thermal paste I have ever applied and seeing the common error of putting too much on, I think I may have put too little. Also, during BIOS is it normal for my frequency to be showing 3.8Ghz? I thought it would run at 3.4ghz and only go up to 3.8 ghz if the processor was had a high workload. (Which I was not expecting from the BIOS workload...)


35-36 at idle is very high for the cooler. My 3770k with case fans turned off idles at 25-26 degrees, and I'm using both low noise adaptors.

I'd wager you just didn't apply enough thermal compound. Take the cooler off, clean it off using isopropyl alcohol, and try applying a bit more.

Maybe take a pic of your processor and the cooler when you remove it. It should be fairly evident if you didn't put enough compound on.

What compound are you using? I've found that the stuff that came with the cooler works great.

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March 26, 2013 11:35:42 AM

This is absolutely normal. The CPU is always under a slight load in the BIOS which could cause turbo boost to kick in. Those temps are fine and your cooler is also perfectly adequate for stock frequency or even a moderate overclock. I would go ahead and install Windows and run Prime 95 for a little while to see what your temps spike to just to be on the safe side, but my guess is that they should be within the normal range. You can always re-apply the thermal paste later if you get something outlandishly high.

Edit: At the Windows desktop with nothing running, the normal range should be between 27 and 35 depending on ambient temps.

Also, be sure to measure your temps with a reputable program such as HW Monitor.
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March 26, 2013 11:44:41 AM

That information isn't enough to really see if your heatsink and thermal paste is installed properly, but at stock setting, it seems a bit high.

Don't worry about the BIOS temp. You need to compare your idle temp -> load temp difference (use prime95 blend, check with CPUID HW monitor, minus ambient temp (room temp @ around 21~23C). With NH-D14, you should be getting low~mid 50C average on load. If temp is still high, try to leave the side panel open to check for temp difference, to see if case airflow is causing temp increases.

As for the Thermal Paste, which one are you using? Arctic Silver 5, or Arctic Cooling MX4 is typically recommended to get a couple of degrees off, and check their website to see application method. Most methods work similarly unless, like you said, you applied too much or too little.

For reference, I have had my 2600K @ 4.4ghz idle around 27~31C and 70C load @ ambient temp of 23C, which is pretty good, but seen better. With side panel off, my temp drops about 2C. temps for 3570K @ 4.2ghz should be similar to or slightly lower than my system. Also take a look at similar cpu temp at various tech websites (i.e. http://www.anandtech.com/show/6830/cpu-air-cooler-round...)
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March 26, 2013 11:47:08 AM

Agreed. BIOS is reading the single "CPU" sensor, not the 4 individual "Core" sensors. Also, the CPU sensor is calibrated from BIOS lookup tables which are often wrong from motherboard BIOS manufacturers, while the Core sensors are calibrated at the factory from Intel. Additionally, keep in mind that the Core sensors are designed to be more accurate at load temperatures, not at idle. When comparing temperatures with other individuals, apples-to-apples is important, so knowing Ambient (intake temperature) is critical.
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March 26, 2013 11:53:07 AM

I am almost positive that it is not the fans causing this issue, and although the Evo is a good cooler, the DH14 is a very good one, better then the EVO, and Noctua fans are some of the best in the business. I don't understand where these specs proving the Evo to be that better then the DH14 are coming from.
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March 26, 2013 12:01:22 PM

that's a fine idle temp and the frequency is fine as well. check both through the OS to confirm. I love my noctua and you should be able to easily get VERY high clocks w/ it

Also, the Noctua has better cooling performance than the CM hyper 212 evo, despite what "GOM3RPLY3R" says... (but the 212 is a better value)
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March 26, 2013 12:35:56 PM

GOM3RPLY3R said:
The thing is that with your fan, the CFM and the RPM of it are a little bit more on the low end. And for the price you paid, which was about $80 right?, you have been ripped off. If you have to order a new one, look at the Master Cooler Hyper 212 EVO. Its about $35 off of newegg and hes a great 600-2000 RPM and to about 85 CFM, which surprisingly enough, costs less than half of yours and has much better specs.

Fan: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Is it quiet? Because I can't hear mine. I can't hear it. The only reason I knew it was on was because I was watching the fans spin.
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March 26, 2013 1:27:57 PM

Dotaholic said:
Is it quiet? Because I can't hear mine. I can't hear it. The only reason I knew it was on was because I was watching the fans spin.
Noctua heatsink should be similar to or quieter than CM 212EVO. http://www.anandtech.com/show/6830/cpu-air-cooler-round....

You can tweak the fan speed in the BIOS or using Speedfan. But by default, it should be set to PWM, so the fan should increase speed depending on CPU load and temp. Like I said, run Prime95 blend, and run Speedfan with 100% for fan speed, and that should be the max noise. If it is quite, you should be happy, as long as the system temp is reasonable.
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March 26, 2013 1:59:29 PM

goonbar79 said:
Dotaholic said:
Is it quiet? Because I can't hear mine. I can't hear it. The only reason I knew it was on was because I was watching the fans spin.
Noctua heatsink should be similar to or quieter than CM 212EVO. http://www.anandtech.com/show/6830/cpu-air-cooler-round....

You can tweak the fan speed in the BIOS or using Speedfan. But by default, it should be set to PWM, so the fan should increase speed depending on CPU load and temp. Like I said, run Prime95 blend, and run Speedfan with 100% for fan speed, and that should be the max noise. If it is quite, you should be happy, as long as the system temp is reasonable.


The NH-D14 comes stock with 3 pin fans, and hence are not controllable using pwm functions in speedfan. The only exception to this is if the special edition design for lga 2011 cpus. There are low speed adaptors included in the kit to slow them down, and I'd recommend using them. The cooler becomes silent while heat only increases by a minimal amount.
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March 26, 2013 2:58:11 PM

wiggbot said:
The NH-D14 comes stock with 3 pin fans, and hence are not controllable using pwm functions in speedfan. The only exception to this is if the special edition design for lga 2011 cpus. There are low speed adaptors included in the kit to slow them down, and I'd recommend using them. The cooler becomes silent while heat only increases by a minimal amount.
Didn't realize that. Thank you for setting my mistake straight.

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March 27, 2013 5:57:33 AM

CompuTronix said:
Agreed. BIOS is reading the single "CPU" sensor, not the 4 individual "Core" sensors. Also, the CPU sensor is calibrated from BIOS lookup tables which are often wrong from motherboard BIOS manufacturers, while the Core sensors are calibrated at the factory from Intel. Additionally, keep in mind that the Core sensors are designed to be more accurate at load temperatures, not at idle. When comparing temperatures with other individuals, apples-to-apples is important, so knowing Ambient (intake temperature) is critical.


I'm using a sniper G.1 board and the BIOS have a seperate temperature for each core. Do they have something that other motherboards don't or is it just posted there to look impressive?

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March 27, 2013 9:13:45 AM

Dotaholic said:
I'm using a sniper G.1 board and the BIOS have a seperate temperature for each core. Do they have something that other motherboards don't or is it just posted there to look impressive?


Like I said, the important thing is idle -> load temp -> minus ambient temp. you won't be able to check load temp in the BIOS because you need to run a stress program to stress all cores to measure the load temp properly. Most of BIOS temp are pretty accurate, so I don't think the results are going to differ while in BIOS vs Windows, but you do need to measure temps at idle and load states, and the easiest way to do that is to run Prime95 while running cpu-z (to see the clock speed changes) and HW monitor ( to see the temp changes per core).

As for the temp per core, this is necessary in order to see the state of your cpu. Different cpu samples have different temps per core, and ultimately you want to see which core hits the highest temp, as well as an average temp of 4 cores combined. Typically, the less gap between any single temp vs the rest, the better. If there is a huge gap, that could also mean problematic cpu sample.
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March 27, 2013 11:14:06 AM

So many great answers. Thanks everyone... Can I pick two solutions? Is there any benefit to being the person that solved the probelm? (I gotta think there is a reason everyone jumps all over these answers so fast, other than sheer nerd-prowess)
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Best solution

March 27, 2013 1:10:45 PM

Answers increase e-peen size
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March 27, 2013 1:11:46 PM

I just like helping, although wiggbot is partially right, I do also enjoy my pretty badges :) .
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