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How many watts do I need for my rig?

Here are my specs:
CPU: Intel i7 2600k
GPU: XFX HD 7870
Motherboard: GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-D3H LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel
SSD (only for OS): Intel 330 Series Maple Crest SSDSC2CT060A3K5 2.5" 60GB SATA III MLC Internal
HDD (for everything else): Western Digital WD Green WD20EARX 2TB 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive - OEM
Memory: G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB
Optical Drive: ASUS 24X DVD Burner (just some 20 dollar drive)

This computer is going to be used mainly for video editing and gaming.
I'm running close on my budget, so the cheaper the better.

Any PSU recommendations?

Thanks!
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about watts rig
  1. That rig might use 300w full load, you could easily run it on a 500w PSU. Although mhtsgr9's statement is correct, 700watts is way overkill unless you plan on adding another GPU.
  2. Best answer
    A system with a single HD 7870 needs a recommended 500w power supply. This is for the entire system and covers overclocking.

    http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

    Stick with Corsair, Seasonic, PC Power and Cooling, XFX, Silverstone, Enermax, OCZ, Antec or the higher efficiency Rosewill units for quality.
  3. Agreed, 500W should be minimum in this rig. 700W would allow for decent expansion/upgrade. There are tons of PC power calculators online, but any answer you get, you should add 20% above what they suggest.
  4. Anort3: Manufacturer recommendations for PSUs are very often inflated due to the fact that truly horrible, old-fashioned AT/ATX PSUs (the ones with as much 3V and 5V power as 12V power) are still used and readily available "cheap" replacements.

    Lucius wasn't too far off... eXtreme PSU Calculator (http://extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine) recommends a PSU of roughly 330W for that config. I'd suggest getting a solid-performing 400-450W model to allow a bit of overclocking headroom. There are plenty good of choices that cost about $50-$60 in that wattage range... Seasonic S12II, FSP Raider, XFX P1-450S, Silverstone SST-ST40F, to name a few. Some will come with the required 2x 6-pin PCIe connectors, and others will only have one. The use of an often included (with video card) 2x 4-pin MOLEX to 1x 6-pin PCIe adapter can solve that issue.
  5. Quote:
    Anort3: Manufacturer recommendations for PSUs are very often inflated due to the fact that truly horrible, old-fashioned AT/ATX PSUs (the ones with as much 3V and 5V power as 12V power) are still used and readily available "cheap" replacements.


    I never would have known.......:sarcastic:
  6. anort3 said:
    I never would have known.......:sarcastic:


    LOL. Yet you were compelled to mention the AMD recommendation anyway, knowing it's pretty much irrelevant... Go figure! :P
  7. Actually it's the Realhardtechx recommendation. And they assume you have at least a half assed decent power supply. You know Realhardtechx? The most comprehensive power supply database on the internet site? And answering as many of these question as I do it's just a tiny bit easier to point people at the nice handy chart Realhardtechx has spent so much time preparing rather than explain on a case by case basis. If someone shows more than a passing knowledge of electronics and will benefit from a more detailed explanation I always give one.
  8. Some of the lower cost PSU's tend to have lower quality parts. If you're too close to the rated recommendations, parts like the capacitors tend to bulge, vent, or leak. By keeping a 20% or larger overhead in the PSU rating AND making sure you're not drawing more Amps on a rail than the PSU can provide, you can lengthen the life of the PSU.
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