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PSU as a UPS replacement??

Last response: in Components
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March 28, 2013 8:09:29 AM

will my corsair cx500w PSU act as an UPS??

More about : psu ups replacement

March 28, 2013 8:12:07 AM

No. It won't continue to provide power when your power source drops.
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March 28, 2013 8:19:36 AM

A PSU is what powers your system when it is shut off it's done. A UPS is different, it's like a back up generator. When your system for example fails, it provides power for a couple minutes to let you finish up what you are doing and save which would other wise mess you up.
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March 28, 2013 8:24:14 AM

no no no.... i didnt mean that... will the PSU be able to provide a clean and stable power for my components so that even a voltage drop dont do damage to my components even if the power is shut suddenly.....
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March 28, 2013 8:29:53 AM

That's the whole point of PSU protections. Yes it will.
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March 28, 2013 8:37:09 AM

Manikandan Pradeep said:
no no no.... i didnt mean that... will the PSU be able to provide a clean and stable power for my components so that even a voltage drop dont do damage to my components even if the power is shut suddenly.....


That is quite a bit different than an Uninterruptable Power Source/Supply (UPS).

There is a degree of under-voltage and short-circuit protection as stated in this product's feature list. If your power is voltage is dropping a lot, no power supply can entirely protect your components.

If this is the case, a real UPS might actually be the solution you need. It will guarantee clean power is always delivered to your supply and will keep things running if your power drops altogether.
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March 28, 2013 9:41:46 AM

I thought he meant just his system turning off suddenly. A PSU should have the protections necessary in an event of voltage drops and such. A UPS is like a backup.
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March 28, 2013 9:44:22 AM

As stated above.
Typical US AC will vary from about 110 to 120 VAC.
Most Computer PSUs will provide a Intolereance output down to approx 90/95 VAC. Ie @ 95 VAC in the +12V might drop by 0.2VDC. This is not a problem UNLESS your +12V is on the low end f the spec. Spec for +12V is 11.4V, sou if your PSU was at 11.5 V and ac dropped to say 90 VAc the 0.2V drop would put you below the 11.4V spec. (PS I ditch my PSU if it ever drops below 11.6V) Also Brown-outs can be rough n PSUs, Low AC input causes the PSU to work harder to provide the regulated DC outputs.

On UPSs.
..Many of the mid->lower grade UPS will NOT help, as the UPS will not kick over to Battery until the AC input drops below 90->95 VAC. Only the much more expensive UPS provide a REGULATED AC output when on AC.
.. " It will guarantee clean power is always delivered to your supply and will keep things running if your power drops altogether. " Not really TRUE. On low end UPS the output AC, whan on Battery" looks really BAD and can damage many of the newer Computer PSU that employ a PFC (Power Factor Correction Circuit). Even the Mid level UPS do NOT provide a "clean" AC out when on battery. Reading the fine print they normally state "Near Sinusoidal" output.
Bottom line on UPS - Chose wisely.
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March 28, 2013 11:16:35 AM

RetiredChief said:
As stated above.
Typical US AC will vary from about 110 to 120 VAC.
Most Computer PSUs will provide a Intolereance output down to approx 90/95 VAC. Ie @ 95 VAC in the +12V might drop by 0.2VDC. This is not a problem UNLESS your +12V is on the low end f the spec. Spec for +12V is 11.4V, sou if your PSU was at 11.5 V and ac dropped to say 90 VAc the 0.2V drop would put you below the 11.4V spec. (PS I ditch my PSU if it ever drops below 11.6V) Also Brown-outs can be rough n PSUs, Low AC input causes the PSU to work harder to provide the regulated DC outputs.

On UPSs.
..Many of the mid->lower grade UPS will NOT help, as the UPS will not kick over to Battery until the AC input drops below 90->95 VAC. Only the much more expensive UPS provide a REGULATED AC output when on AC.
.. " It will guarantee clean power is always delivered to your supply and will keep things running if your power drops altogether. " Not really TRUE. On low end UPS the output AC, whan on Battery" looks really BAD and can damage many of the newer Computer PSU that employ a PFC (Power Factor Correction Circuit). Even the Mid level UPS do NOT provide a "clean" AC out when on battery. Reading the fine print they normally state "Near Sinusoidal" output.
Bottom line on UPS - Chose wisely.


Let me specify I did not tell the poster to go out and buy some cheap equipment to mitigate power issues. Maybe I should have been more clear.
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March 28, 2013 12:31:42 PM

^ I'm OK with what YOU said, just added some clarification as some would assume that any UPS aslon as wattage rating meet there need they could just go out and grab the cheapest one available.

PS, I KNOW you would not do that and would never recommend that approach.
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March 30, 2013 6:14:02 AM

That's for sure. Thanks for that clarification. I guess I took it the wrong way.

On top of UPSs, I actually have separate dedicated circuits in my house for my PCs' outlets and my entertainment center. I'm all about keeping these things cooking with as much clean power as possible. My AC is on it's own power line altogether having its own power main. The only thing I haven't done (yet?) is brought in a separate main for my PCs/entertainment center. The UPSs and dedicated circuits take care of things pretty well without it though. And I don't even live in an area with frequent black outs, brown outs or power problems in general.
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