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Intel CPUs Haswell V. Ivy Bridge

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March 28, 2013 2:05:01 PM

Hello, I'm building a new rig specifically for gaming and I was planning on buying an i7-3770K Ivy Bridge (3rd generation). But then I heard about the Haswell (4th generation) CPUs and I was wondering if it would be worth it to wait for those ones to come out. Before people start telling me about value and performance per dollar, price doesn't matter too much. I'd like it to circa $400 but it's ok if it's larger. Also, I know about the integrated graphics card, I'm going ot be disabling that and using a dedicated video card.
a b à CPUs
March 28, 2013 2:08:39 PM

with gaming, the video card does most of the heavy lifting. Either CPU will feed your cards for some time so the question is simply, do you feel like waiting for a haswell?
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March 28, 2013 2:10:14 PM

Well, I was just wondering if the Haswells offered a really significant increase in overall/gaming performance or if it was mainly the power efficiency thing that they have going on.
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a b à CPUs
March 28, 2013 2:21:24 PM

intel has used "power efficiency" with haswell as if its part of the name of the chip, with good reason as their real competition seems to be ARM & Apple. I doubt it's much of a performance improvement over ivy
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a c 101 à CPUs
March 28, 2013 2:24:33 PM

HarDHar said:
Before people start telling me about value and performance per dollar, price doesn't matter too much.


I'm not going to tell you about price to performance, I'm going to tell you you're wasting your money.

For gaming, an i7-3770k will perform EXACTLY THE SAME as an i5-3570k... the only difference between the two chips is that the i7 has hyperthreading... well, games don't use hyperthreading, and even the ones that claim to can actually be slowed down by it, so your best bet is to have an overclock profile that has hyperthreading disabled... meaning you're paying $100 more for the EXACT same chip and performance, practically.

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March 28, 2013 2:25:19 PM

Ok thanks for your help, I'll probably just stick with the model I already chose. Thanks!
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March 28, 2013 2:25:59 PM

ivy bridge should work just fine. There are no graphics cards currently that are bottlenecked by Ivy Bridge, so most likely the performance difference is slight, its more about efficiency than performance.
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a c 117 å Intel
a c 478 à CPUs
March 28, 2013 2:26:54 PM

The main focus of Haswell is lowered power consumption. Performance will increase but likely not by much assuming the same clockspeed. I estimate a 6% increase in performance; 8% at the very most. Overall, even an 8% increase in performance will only have a small impact on gaming performance if the game is dependent on the CPU. If it mostly relies on the the GPU, then you will see no increase whatsoever.

For argument sake assume an 8% increase in performance. Does that mean your frame rates will improve by 8% for a CPU dependent game? No. It will be less depending on how well the game can effectively use CPU. I would say under the best circumstance the performance increase will be 4% or 5%; not the full 8%.
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a b à CPUs
March 28, 2013 2:35:12 PM

mafisometal said:
ivy bridge should work just fine. There are no graphics cards currently that are bottlenecked by Ivy Bridge, so most likely the performance difference is slight, its more about efficiency than performance.


there are no graphic cards bottlenecked by a slight OC on a sandy chip. the CPU market is a changing

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March 28, 2013 2:37:43 PM

if you wanna use only dedicated graphics card then better buy ivy without integrated graphics such as Intel XEON processor.
Xeon is like a 3770K without integrated graphics.
You are building a gaming rig. in gaming rig graphic card plays more important role then CPU. so if you are willing to buy a next generation part for your build, get a decent graphic card like 7970 or GTX 670
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a c 117 å Intel
a c 478 à CPUs
March 28, 2013 6:45:41 PM

k1114 said:
I'm surprised no one linked the preview article. It shows a similar performance increase from sb>ib>hw. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/core-i7-4770k-haswe...


Okay so....

For 1366x768 the average performance increase is from the HD 4000 to HD 4600 is 28.6%.

For 1920x1080 the average performance increase is from the HD 4000 to HD 4600 is 18.2%.

Average overall performance increase is 23.4%.

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April 4, 2013 7:37:14 AM

Never wait for any thing.. Same wise don't advance to buy any thing..

Always buy when you feel the performance is not enough. But when ever you buy buy the newest architecture available ..

If you think today your build is not performing enough or manageable. Buy Ivy bridge / Panther point and GTX 600 or HD7xxx card
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April 17, 2013 10:38:38 PM

I'd wait for Haswell and LGA1150, you get more of an upgrade path that way, but wait beyond launch SKU's because from what I can tell the integrated voltage regulators have some sort of problem on Haswell chips. LGA1155's about to be a dead socket, it'll save you money on upgrades down the line.
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April 17, 2013 10:51:38 PM

Pl never talk Problems about a product before it is released for public usage
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April 26, 2013 12:43:30 PM

I'm not an expert in processors by any means. But I think you'll be better with the Ivy Bridge. I think Haswell uses a 28nm process and Broadwell uses 14 (correct me if I'm wrong). I think intel is doing this on purpose because they virtually have no competition in the home cpu market. Theoretically, if Farcry 3 runs 50fps on your ivy bridge, it will go perhaps up to 55 fps with a jump to Haswell. Not big enough difference if you ask me....not to mention all of the crankies the first batch is going to have (can't wait for the threads!).
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