Question about refresh rates and frames

Hi all, and thanks in advance for any help offered.

I'm wanting to upgrade my monitor and I'm deciding between getting a higher resolution display (i.e. 1440p), or a screen with a better refresh rate, or an HDTV.

I'm confused on refresh rates and how they pertain to frames per second. I know that it's basically 1:1 with refresh rates and FPS so a 60hz monitor can't display more than 60 fps. What about HDTV's that claim higher refresh rates? I know most monitors are 60hz but I regularly see HDTVs touting 120hz refresh rates. Why is it rarer (or more expensive) on monitors?

Would a 120hz HDTV be capable of outputting up to 120 frames per second? What about plasma?

Plasma TVs always claim 600hz, but I know that can't be true, I'm assuming they multiply it by something or the other, but would it still be capable of pushing past 60 fps?

I'm leaning towards getting a plasma HDTV and not bothering with the higher resolutions past 1080p, as I find 1080p is more than fine for a nice looking display, but I want to make sure I can get the most frames out of my display of choice as possible. Also to answer ahead of time I want more than 60fps because all I basically plan on doing with my PC is gaming and want it as optimal as possible, even if most games can't go to 120fps.

Thanks again for any help!
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More about question refresh rates frames
  1. Dullaware said:
    I'm confused on refresh rates and how they pertain to frames per second. I know that it's basically 1:1 with refresh rates and FPS so a 60hz monitor can't display more than 60 fps. What about HDTV's that claim higher refresh rates? I know most monitors are 60hz but I regularly see HDTVs touting 120hz refresh rates. Why is it rarer (or more expensive) on monitors?


    The HDTV's lie. They aren't actually 120Hz capable - what they do is take input of 60Hz, and interpolate each frame, (basically showing it twice) to get "120 Hz." There are a few out there that are actually 120Hz capable, but you'll have to pay through the nose. All monitors that are 120Hz are actually 120Hz, which is why they're more expensive.

    Dullaware said:
    Would a 120hz HDTV be capable of outputting up to 120 frames per second? What about plasma? Plasma TVs always claim 600hz, but I know that can't be true, I'm assuming they multiply it by something or the other, but would it still be capable of pushing past 60 fps?
    Not unless you pay a LOT of money... and keep in mind that most HDTVs aren't even 1080p... and that even if they are, the pixels are larger, so everything looks worse anyways. As for Plasma TVs, that's a complete lie, or else all gamers would have them. (See here for more information: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-33199_7-57548118-221/what-is-600hz/)

    Dullaware said:
    I'm leaning towards getting a plasma HDTV and not bothering with the higher resolutions past 1080p, as I find 1080p is more than fine for a nice looking display, but I want to make sure I can get the most frames out of my display of choice as possible. Also to answer ahead of time I want more than 60fps because all I basically plan on doing with my PC is gaming and want it as optimal as possible, even if most games can't go to 120fps.
    Don't bother with an HDTV unless you're going to be sitting a long ways away from it - it'll look WAY worse than an actual monitor. Get a REAL gaming monitor - you'll actually have a decent experience, then. The best on the market is the BenQ XL2420T - it's bloody incredible; makes it feel like you're cheating.
  2. It is not showing the frames twice, that would make it exactly like 60fps. It is frame blending.
  3. k1114 said:
    It is not showing the frames twice, that would make it exactly like 60fps. It is frame blending.


    No, I'm saying that it only will accept a 60Hz input signal, which makes it no better than a 60Hz monitor.
    What I was saying about showing it twice was me trying to explain interpolation.
  4. I know what you are talking about but it's incorrect to say it shows the same frame twice. Frame blending is simple enough.
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