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How to test if motherboard is fried or not after frying processor?

Last response: in Motherboards
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March 29, 2013 11:05:54 PM

A friend asked me this question because one of his friends' processor got fried. It happened when the assembler from a computer shop tried overclocking the system without replacing the stock heat sink fan and without the owner's knowledge.

He now has no CPU but wants to know if his motherboard can still be salvaged. I also told him to sue the store or ask for a replacement on all the broken/fried components but he said this happened 2 years ago and is not sure if the guy who was at fault still works there.

I tried thinking that he should get a working CPU with a compatible socket and test if the system goes past POST/load BIOS. He says it's a Sandy bridge socket. My suggestion of using a spare CPU is that it might fry that CPU if the mobo is broken. Are there any other way to test the motherboard?

A little edit and misinformation. It wasn't anyone's fault at any store. The owner said he did a BIOS update but forgot to clear the CMOS to load optimized defaults and found that it was overclocked by default after the update. I hope that clears up some confusion.
March 29, 2013 11:18:50 PM

As far as my knowledge goes, the only way to test motherboards is with a cpu installed. Now, the ''sandy bridge'' socket may refer to the LGA1155 socket, which gas a determined set of compatible cpus. Any 1155 CPU (regardless of the generation) will do.

After that, you go safe mode and reset the CMOS with the jumper to restore the original BIOS. Im pretty sure that a bad overclock can only corrupt a BIOS (not fry its ROM), and it is very unlikely that it incurred on mobo damage.
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March 29, 2013 11:33:17 PM

azraa said:
As far as my knowledge goes, the only way to test motherboards is with a cpu installed. Now, the ''sandy bridge'' socket may refer to the LGA1155 socket, which gas a determined set of compatible cpus. Any 1155 CPU (regardless of the generation) will do.

After that, you go safe mode and reset the CMOS with the jumper to restore the original BIOS. Im pretty sure that a bad overclock can only corrupt a BIOS (not fry its ROM), and it is very unlikely that it incurred on mobo damage.


Thanks for the reply. Yeah, that's what I thought too. Problem is, in another store, they don't want to try testing the motherboard with a new CPU as it might fry that. I told him what you said about what could be damaged after a failed overclock but haven't replied yet. It's just the matter of finding a spare CPU and testing it out.
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March 30, 2013 11:03:06 AM

Regarding your question of the possibility of fry that spare CPU, I cant really help you.
I have the idea that an overclock issue could damage the VRM, but if that were the case, the motherboard wouldn't work at all. If that is the case, and the VRMs are okay, then there should be no problem installing a new cpu, since the damage is in the bios chip, which can be resetted via CMOS. However, i cannot confirm this. You should wait for futher responses.
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