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One SATA3 SSD for OS, Pagefile, Programs, and Program Cache Files?

Hello, I'm thinking about getting one 120GB SSD for Windows 7 or 8 64 bit, and couple of programs (Cinema4D and CS6)...

120GB Samsung 840 Series SATA III Solid State Drive

I'm thinking of keeping the pagefile on that same disk, and also, CS6 also use its own scratch disk, and I'm thinking of keep it on that same drive as well...

I'll also have a SATA2 HDD for data files to work on, and another external USB3 HDD for outputting data files worked on.

Is there a better way to set it up?
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. That looks reasonable to me.
    You will love the ssd.
    You will get suggestions about ssd "tweaks", but don't bother.
    120gb is normally sufficient for the os and a handful of apps/games.
    Do not let the ssd fill up, or it will start to slow down. Perhaps up to 85%.
    If in doubt, buy 180gb or even 240gb.
  2. I would strongly suggest you have a secondary drive - the reason being SSD's are not the best drive to a pagefile as the constant read / write process over time can severely degrade performance.
  3. The reason you buy a ssd is precisely to speed up reads and writes to critical performance files such as the page file. A hard page fault stops your app until it can be resolved. With a ssd of adequate capacity, even heavy desktop usage will not use up it's capability for perhaps 10 years, long after the ssd is obsolete. And... In the unlikely event that happens, you will still be able to read the drive so you can copy it to a larger one.
  4. This should be what you're looking for, a dedicated cache SSD... it was literally built to do these tasks unlike a normal SSD.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820171667
  5. geofelt said:
    The reason you buy a ssd is precisely to speed up reads and writes to critical performance files such as the page file. A hard page fault stops your app until it can be resolved. With a ssd of adequate capacity, even heavy desktop usage will not use up it's capability for perhaps 10 years, long after the ssd is obsolete. And... In the unlikely event that happens, you will still be able to read the drive so you can copy it to a larger one.

    Thanks Geofelt. That makes a lot of sense.

    Regarding what Burritobob said, that product info says it's for desktop... I dont' know if I can add it to the laptop?

    The laptop I'm getting has an option to add a SSD for scratch disk, but it's $149... -_-

    90GB Kingston SATA III Caching Solid-State Drive - 64GB Usable

    But according to Geofelt, adding the extra SSD for caching would not be worth the money?
  6. That this is a laptop puts a different spin on things.
    It sounds like yours has an option for a second hard drive.

    Laptop hard drives are optimized for battery savings, not performance.
    I have replaced the hard drive on every one of my laptops. The performance difference is amazing, it absolutely transforms the performance. It is usually not that hard to do, and buying a cheaper laptop with a minimal hard drive and replacing it with your own ssd often turns out much cheaper.

    The main question is how large a ssd is needed. If you are undecided, then spend the extra to get the next larger size.
    Some laptops have only a single drive, and sufficient storage may be too expensive for a ssd. In that case a less expensive option is hybrid ssd/hard drive like the Seagate momentus.
    But, it is only a partial solution, and not nearly as good as a true dedicated ssd.
    Since there is a second hard drive available for you to use for storage etc., that is good.
  7. geofelt said:
    That this is a laptop puts a different spin on things.
    It sounds like yours has an option for a second hard drive.

    Laptop hard drives are optimized for battery savings, not performance.
    I have replaced the hard drive on every one of my laptops. The performance difference is amazing, it absolutely transforms the performance. It is usually not that hard to do, and buying a cheaper laptop with a minimal hard drive and replacing it with your own ssd often turns out much cheaper.

    The main question is how large a ssd is needed. If you are undecided, then spend the extra to get the next larger size.
    Some laptops have only a single drive, and sufficient storage may be too expensive for a ssd. In that case a less expensive option is hybrid ssd/hard drive like the Seagate momentus.
    But, it is only a partial solution, and not nearly as good as a true dedicated ssd.
    Since there is a second hard drive available for you to use for storage etc., that is good.

    I might actually try that. I was scared to add hardware myself.

    Here is the link to the laptop before customization...

    http://www.powernotebooks.com/PowerPro-R-11-36-670-gaming-laptop-notebooks-sys-4706.html

    I guess that allows 2 internal drives plus "mini-drives" that attach to the hard drives?

    I was thinking 1 internal SSD for OS/apps and 1 internal HDD for data files being worked on... plus I have huge external usb3 hdd for storing and rending files.
  8. Best answer
    I don't know enough about that particular laptop vendor.
    If you find a laptop that suits you from Lenovo, it will likely be easy enough to change out the hard drive for a ssd.
    To be certain, google the laptop and ssd replacement to discover any issues. You may also find a tutorial on how to do it.
    Some of the newer ultrabooks depend on a 7mm ssd, such as the Samsung ssd's. They would not fit some of the 9.5mm Intel ssd's.

    You can usually clone the original hard drive to a new ssd.
    I usually just reinstall the os on the new ssd. That eliminates bloatware, but I have to find and install all the appropriate drivers.
  9. geofelt said:
    I don't know enough about that particular laptop vendor.
    If you find a laptop that suits you from Lenovo, it will likely be easy enough to change out the hard drive for a ssd.
    To be certain, google the laptop and ssd replacement to discover any issues. You may also find a tutorial on how to do it.
    Some of the newer ultrabooks depend on a 7mm ssd, such as the Samsung ssd's. They would not fit some of the 9.5mm Intel ssd's.

    You can usually clone the original hard drive to a new ssd.
    I usually just reinstall the os on the new ssd. That eliminates bloatware, but I have to find and install all the appropriate drivers.


    Thanks for all your help. Cleared up a lot of things.
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