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SATA Rev III (6.0 Gb/s) Drive on SATA II (3.0 Gb/s) port

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April 3, 2013 12:15:04 AM

So while I tried to do a google search for this particular topic, I was wondering if anyone found evidence that it mattered whether or not a standard mechanical hard drive was SATA III or SATA II. For example, a SATA III drive capable of 7200 RPM is the ideal drive these days, but does it even saturate a SATA II connection? Would it be encumbered by a lower revision port?

The reason I ask is because I'm under the distinct impression that there is no discernible or quantifiable difference between SATA II and SATA III when it would come to a 7200 RPM drive.
April 3, 2013 12:59:26 AM

SATA3 uses the same 'connector' as SATA2. Same as SATA1 even. The electronics on both ends, the computer and device differ though.

SATA 3 and all SATA' devices are considered 'backwards compatible', that is if you connected a SATA III hard drive to a computer that has SATA II built-in, the drive will only operated at the speed of SATA II level. In effect, you'd not get any better performance that you would with a SATA II device (and waste your money you paid extra to get SATA III).
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April 3, 2013 1:10:00 AM

if this is a mechanical drive, then i don't think it would matter. they are just too slow to even saturate the sata2.
if this was SSD then sata 3 vs sata2 would matter. because as far as i know, only ssd can saturate the bandwidth, but not mechanical drives.
think about it, i have a sata2 ssd (kinda old), but it is alot faster than my mechanical hdd, so how can a sata3 hdd can saturate sata2 when an ssd sata2 cannot?

and no, in my opinion, it is not wasted money, as all new HDD's now are sata3 as far as i know
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June 30, 2013 6:46:12 PM

patrick47018 said:
SATA3 uses the same 'connector' as SATA2. Same as SATA1 even. The electronics on both ends, the computer and device differ though.

SATA 3 and all SATA' devices are considered 'backwards compatible', that is if you connected a SATA III hard drive to a computer that has SATA II built-in, the drive will only operated at the speed of SATA II level. In effect, you'd not get any better performance that you would with a SATA II device (and waste your money you paid extra to get SATA III).


I have a laptop with an sata II port. The cost of an sata III drive is the same now. So the real question is that if an older sata II drive will not max out a sata II port then will an sata III drive automatically max out the sata II port? Of course we are dealing with ssd's and the limitation is specific to the hardware and drivers.
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