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SSD: Sata II card vs. III

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April 3, 2013 12:32:21 PM

I recently installed a Sata II PCI card so I could connect to an external HDD. The card has an internal hookup as well, and I'm thinking of buying a 250 SSD and connect it to the Sata II card. My question is, can I buy a Sata III drive and connect it to the Sata II PCI card? Is it backward compatible? I could also use an available Sata II cable that is native to the computer. Would that be a better way to connect it? The PCI Sata card is a Vantec. I have windows 7 in a 64 bit AMD dual core with 8 GB ram.

More about : ssd sata card iii

a b G Storage
April 3, 2013 12:43:40 PM

A SATA III SSD would be backwardly compatible with a SATA II controller, but would perform only at SATA II speeds and limits. You can also attach a SATA II HDD to a SATA III controlled. and you would still only have SATA II speeds and throughput.
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a b G Storage
April 3, 2013 12:53:20 PM

You would only get about half to two thirds of the throughput if you put a SATA III SSD on a SATA II controller. Kind of a waste after spending all that money on the SSD.
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a c 297 G Storage
April 3, 2013 2:02:56 PM

Please post the model number of the Vantec SATA 2 PCIe card so more detailed information can be provided.

Modern 3rd generation solid state drives require 4 channels as in PCIe 2.0 x4 (or PCIe 3.0 x4 ) for optimal performance. There are low budget and entry level SATA cards that have just 2 channels. In addition there are some cards that have 4 channels but as soon as a second device is connected the channels are split so each device has only 2 channels.

There may be a boot problem too. It is not always possible to use a drive connected to a card as a boot device. Whether or not the drive can be used as a primary boot drive depends on the motherboard's system BIOS. There may or may not be BIOS settings for such a configuration.

If you have a motherboard that supports solid state drives and an unused SATA port on the motherboard, then you would be better off connecting the ssd to the SATA port on the motherboard. That would eliminate most of the problems associated with add-on cards.

SATA 3 6Gb/s ssd's are backwards compatible with SATA 2 3Gb/s. However, the ssd performance will be restricted to SATA 2 levels. Typically a consumer would not notice the difference between SATA 2 and SATA 3 performance. One would have to run synthetic benchmarks designed to grossly exaggerate minor difference in order to measure them. It would be different if the user was a rocket scientist or a Hollywood film editor.

EDIT - I think I made a mistake and got things mixed up. It is very easy to get confused at my age. It is supposed to be PCIe x2 for standard ssd's and PCIe x4 for PCIe ssd's.

In the meantime while checking for new hardware reviews a little while ago I found a review over at Maximum PC for a fairly new PCIe adapter card designed expressly for ssd's. It will also let the ssd function as the primary boot drive. It looks promising. Here is the link:

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/%5Bprimary-term%5D/apr...

NOTE - You'll have to check the system requirements.

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April 3, 2013 7:12:57 PM

clarkjd said:
A SATA III SSD would be backwardly compatible with a SATA II controller, but would perform only at SATA II speeds and limits. You can also attach a SATA II HDD to a SATA III controlled. and you would still only have SATA II speeds and throughput.


Thank you for your help, JD

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April 3, 2013 7:13:56 PM

mbreslin1954 said:
You would only get about half to two thirds of the throughput if you put a SATA III SSD on a SATA II controller. Kind of a waste after spending all that money on the SSD.


Thank you for your help Mr. Breslin

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April 3, 2013 7:20:17 PM

JohnnyLucky said:
Please post the model number of the Vantec SATA 2 PCIe card so more detailed information can be provided.

Modern 3rd generation solid state drives require 4 channels as in PCIe 2.0 x4 (or PCIe 3.0 x4 ) for optimal performance. There are low budget and entry level SATA cards that have just 2 channels. In addition there are some cards that have 4 channels but as soon as a second device is connected the channels are split so each device has only 2 channels.

That's alright, I'm ancient too, and so is my computer. The Vantec card model # is: UGT-ST300.
now I'm wondering if my mobo is

There may be a boot problem too. It is not always possible to use a drive connected to a card as a boot device. Whether or not the drive can be used as a primary boot drive depends on the motherboard's system BIOS. There may or may not be BIOS settings for such a configuration.

If you have a motherboard that supports solid state drives and an unused SATA port on the motherboard, then you would be better off connecting the ssd to the SATA port on the motherboard. That would eliminate most of the problems associated with add-on cards.

SATA 3 6Gb/s ssd's are backwards compatible with SATA 2 3Gb/s. However, the ssd performance will be restricted to SATA 2 levels. Typically a consumer would not notice the difference between SATA 2 and SATA 3 performance. One would have to run synthetic benchmarks designed to grossly exaggerate minor difference in order to measure them. It would be different if the user was a rocket scientist or a Hollywood film editor.

EDIT - I think I made a mistake and got things mixed up. It is very easy to get confused at my age. It is supposed to be PCIe x2 for standard ssd's and PCIe x4 for PCIe ssd's.

In the meantime while checking for new hardware reviews a little while ago I found a review over at Maximum PC for a fairly new PCIe adapter card designed expressly for ssd's. It will also let the ssd function as the primary boot drive. It looks promising. Here is the link:

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/%5Bprimary-term%5D/apr...

NOTE - You'll have to check the system requirements.



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April 3, 2013 7:34:16 PM

That's alright JL, I'm ancient too, and so is my computer. I appreciate your detailed response. The Vantec card # is: UGT-ST300. Ok, so, it would be best to use the native mobo port. Now, you said the mobo would have to be SSD compatible. It's rather old, and I'm not sure it would be. It's an NVIDIA GeForce6150 SE. As far as noticing any difference between Sata II vs. III, I'm not a gamer, but I am a musician, and I use Sonar, as well as sound libraries (one is over 30 GB). Eventually I will upgrade my computer, but for now I was hoping that the SSD would load my sound samples faster, and also solve a problem with the Bass instruments, which cause the computer to crash. I can't use my best basses as a result. How does one go about determining if the mobo is compatible with SSD? Would the specs on the SSD tell me, or give me a direction to go in?
Thanks very much,
michael

JohnnyLucky said:
Please post the model number of the Vantec SATA 2 PCIe card so more detailed information can be provided.

Modern 3rd generation solid state drives require 4 channels as in PCIe 2.0 x4 (or PCIe 3.0 x4 ) for optimal performance. There are low budget and entry level SATA cards that have just 2 channels. In addition there are some cards that have 4 channels but as soon as a second device is connected the channels are split so each device has only 2 channels.

There may be a boot problem too. It is not always possible to use a drive connected to a card as a boot device. Whether or not the drive can be used as a primary boot drive depends on the motherboard's system BIOS. There may or may not be BIOS settings for such a configuration.

If you have a motherboard that supports solid state drives and an unused SATA port on the motherboard, then you would be better off connecting the ssd to the SATA port on the motherboard. That would eliminate most of the problems associated with add-on cards.

SATA 3 6Gb/s ssd's are backwards compatible with SATA 2 3Gb/s. However, the ssd performance will be restricted to SATA 2 levels. Typically a consumer would not notice the difference between SATA 2 and SATA 3 performance. One would have to run synthetic benchmarks designed to grossly exaggerate minor difference in order to measure them. It would be different if the user was a rocket scientist or a Hollywood film editor.

EDIT - I think I made a mistake and got things mixed up. It is very easy to get confused at my age. It is supposed to be PCIe x2 for standard ssd's and PCIe x4 for PCIe ssd's.

In the meantime while checking for new hardware reviews a little while ago I found a review over at Maximum PC for a fairly new PCIe adapter card designed expressly for ssd's. It will also let the ssd function as the primary boot drive. It looks promising. Here is the link:

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/%5Bprimary-term%5D/apr...

NOTE - You'll have to check the system requirements.



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a c 297 G Storage
April 4, 2013 2:09:35 PM

More Bad news.

Your motherboard is an older AMD 939/758 board that was released in 2007 prior to the advent of consumer oriented solid state drives. Although the board is SATA 2 3Gb/s capable, the capability does not include ssd's. Support was limited to hard disk drives and optical drives. There are no motherboard system BIOS updates, chipset updates, or drivers that would help.
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a b G Storage
April 4, 2013 2:44:38 PM

Yeah, I wondered when I saw that it was a GeForce6150 SE. I used to have a couple of those, I think well before 2007, back when I used to buy the Athlon XP3000+. That's a very old board.
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April 4, 2013 8:05:03 PM

Thanks JL. Would it be worthwhile to get a new mobo, or should I just give it up for dead and buy/build a whole new rig? I've never done a mobo upgrade. I do things like hard drives, sound cards, etc. I converted my system from 32 bit to 64 bit and doubled the memory to 8 GB. I think I could probably handle a mobo upgrade, I just don't know if it's worth it. The computer is working fine, except for that ridiculous "display driver failed and recovered" problem that nobody seems to be able to solve. and the problem with crashes if I use East West Basses. but other than that it works beautifully. The computer itself is a Gateway GT 5656.

JohnnyLucky said:
More Bad news.

Your motherboard is an older AMD 939/758 board that was released in 2007 prior to the advent of consumer oriented solid state drives. Although the board is SATA 2 3Gb/s capable, the capability does not include ssd's. Support was limited to hard disk drives and optical drives. There are no motherboard system BIOS updates, chipset updates, or drivers that would help.


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April 4, 2013 8:06:58 PM

thanks for the input, Mr. Breslin - see my response to JohnnyLucky for more info.

mbreslin1954 said:
Yeah, I wondered when I saw that it was a GeForce6150 SE. I used to have a couple of those, I think well before 2007, back when I used to buy the Athlon XP3000+. That's a very old board.


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