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Installing new 120gb SSD with fresh Win7 install, what programs should I put on my SSD?

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Last response: in Systems
April 3, 2013 12:47:38 PM

Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 AM3+ AMD 990FX SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit
CPU: AMD FX-4100 Zambezi 3.6GHz AM3+ 95W Quad-Core
GPU: 2x GeForce GTX 550 Ti SLI
Sound Card: See mobo
RAM: 4x 4gb G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 240-Pin DDR3 1600
Optical Drive: Blu-Ray Burner
Old HD: 1.5tb Western Dig 7200rpm
New SSD: Samsung 840 120GB SATA III

I've had this fairly modest rig for a couple years now, and it always bugged me that my Microsoft score was a 5.9 because of my HD being the weakest link in the chain. It has also been awhile since I've cleared up old programs or made a fresh backup.

I've finally bought a new SSD in hopes of speeding up processing times, and raising that damn score (all my other components are rated in the 7s)! I plan on starting with a fresh install of Win7 and I have a couple goals. I find preparation is the best way to meet them, however, there are a couple areas I'm uncertain about and was hoping for some advice:

1. My Windows disk is an "upgrade" disc, and I no longer can locate my WinXP copy I upgraded from. I was told an "upgrade" disc has all the files, will I be able to install new OS on SSD through Windows?

2. I know I need mobo and GPU drivers, but are there other drivers needed? Do SSD, CPU, or RAM require any drivers?

3. I assume the OS won't take up the whole space, which other programs should be installed on the SSD? Ex. Firefox, Skyrim (I have a lot of mods, would they have to go too?), other games, Office, Rainmeter?

4. Where is a good stopping point to create a clean image backup to keep on the old HD?

Thank you in advance for any help you could lend.

More about : installing 120gb ssd fresh win7 install programs put ssd

a c 111 V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
April 3, 2013 1:55:50 PM

First, the Windows 7 "upgrade disc" will install on a "virgin" installation. DO NOT ENTER THE KEY CODE WHEN PROMPTED during setup - skip it. You have 30 days to activate windows. After finishing the installation and updates, then go to your control panel and search for "activate windows", then enter the key code. Worst case scenario - you have to call the 800# and tell them this is the only installation (provided you are not using this on another computer).

Second, you should always install the most current drivers for your system from the internet (manufacturer's website). You may have to install from the CD-ROM and update them if you can't connect to the internet. All the components listed above are located on Gigabyte's website and your GPU's website.

Before you do the installation - it may be worth while to download all the drivers to a thumb drive or create your own DVD of the drivers. Next, install only the SSD (no HDD) and install Windows 7. After finishing the installation, then add the HDD.

As for the programs to install on the SSD, you should be able to install most of them on the SSD, provided you are putting all of your documents, photos and other data files on the HDD. I would leave around 20-25% of the drive as free space - just in case. Windows 7 doesn't take that much room on the drive.

Last - before starting, take a look here:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/284934-32-tips-users
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April 3, 2013 6:26:26 PM

Thanks alot for the succinct answers. Would it be possible to install Windows on the SSD through the CD when I'm booted from the already installed Windows on the HDD, then just change the boot drive to the SSD? I've heard it "increases the chances" of the product key not giving problems.
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a c 111 V Motherboard
a b à CPUs
April 4, 2013 7:55:46 AM

The problem with installing Windows on the SSD while the HDD is present - sometimes the files are installed in the wrong places and you have issues. When you install with no HDD present, Windows assumes the SSD is the only drive, and puts ALL the files there.
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April 4, 2013 12:15:49 PM

ronintexas said:
The problem with installing Windows on the SSD while the HDD is present - sometimes the files are installed in the wrong places and you have issues. When you install with no HDD present, Windows assumes the SSD is the only drive, and puts ALL the files there.


I see. I would rather assure a solid install over taking a shortcut. Thanks. I'm going to hold off a week to a weekend more open.
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