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How often does your pc catch on fire?

Last response: in Systems
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April 3, 2013 7:52:04 PM

I recently have started mining so i leave my computer mining all day.

Today my mom yelled at me for leaving my computer on while i was at school.

I told her i was fine paying the electricity (mining is more profitable than electric costs so im fine with that)

She told me that she was worried about the house catching on fire and burning down.

So I want to know:
What are the odds of a computer catching on fire with these temps:

Hd: 24c
Ssd: 30c
Cpu core 1-4: ~10-15c
Gpu: less than 55c

I want to know how easily a computer with these temps would catch fire

More about : catch fire

April 3, 2013 7:56:04 PM

My mind catches on fire when people bring petty squabbles between them and their mothers to this forum.
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April 3, 2013 7:57:22 PM

Its very unlikely. The way components are built these days that have precautions that shut down if there is a power surge. The thing you would worry about is your power supply frying, but that usually consists of a loud Pop noise and then shut down.
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April 3, 2013 7:58:49 PM

Kjwinden said:
My mind catches on fire when people bring petty squabbles between them and their mothers to this forum.


Its not so much as a squabble.
I would like to know what the odds are of my computer catching on fire.
I figure its pretty small but she seems to think its a good chance.
So what is the likelihood, is more what im asking.

I guess i didnt have to share the background but i figured it would let you guys see why im curious.
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April 3, 2013 8:00:00 PM

tenaciousk said:
Its very unlikely. The way components are built these days that have precautions that shut down if there is a power surge. The thing you would worry about is your power supply frying, but that usually consists of a loud Pop noise and then shut down.


Well will a 650w bronze 80 plus PSU be fine with a system running one GPU?
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April 3, 2013 8:03:14 PM

Think about it...

A computer is made of plastics and metal, nothing in that is going to burn. At absolute worst, a spark from the PSU which would set something around the PC on fire, which is highly unlikely and if you have a decent PSU (which PC's should) the chances of a spark are near zero anyway.

So unless you decide to fill your PC with sawdust (and it will likely shut down to avoid overheating before it catches fire), the chance can be considered to be absolutely none.
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April 3, 2013 8:06:12 PM

manofchalk said:
Think about it...

A computer is made of plastics and metal, nothing in that is going to burn. At absolute worst, a spark from the PSU which would set something around the PC on fire, which is highly unlikely and if you have a decent PSU (which PC's should) the chances of a spark are near zero anyway.

So unless you decide to fill your PC with sawdust (and it will likely shut down to avoid overheating before it catches fire), the chance can be considered to be absolutely none.


Thats what i thought.
Its kind of like the safety of an old Model T car might not be that safe but now with advances in technology car's safety with air bags, seat belts, and various other things make it improved.
Smilarily computers have bren integrated with certain safety features.
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April 3, 2013 8:06:21 PM

All lies!! my computer catches fire at least once a month. Under no circumstances leave your computer running against your mothers will. Worse then a house fire, it can start a heart fire....so Listen to your mother, and eat your vegetables.
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April 3, 2013 8:08:16 PM

clipso said:
All lies!! my computer catches fire at least once a month. Under no circumstances leave your computer running against your mothers will. Worse then a house fire, it can start a heart fire....so Listen to your mother, and eat your vegetables.


LOL!!! Definitely made me laugh!
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April 3, 2013 8:12:27 PM

Plastic doesn't burn? Ok I'm I also to believe water doesn't freeze, and gravity causes things to float upwards?

Your computer could absolutely light on fire. However the chances of that are so low that you could tell your mom to start buying powerball tickets, and the day she wins is the day your computer will light itself on fire.

In that case with her powerball winnings she can buy a new house and you a new computer.
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April 3, 2013 8:15:47 PM

Manofchalk please don't tell people that plastics don't burn anymore...that is so flagrantly false that it makes me more aggravated than someone posting a stupid argument between them and their mothers.
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April 3, 2013 8:15:55 PM

OK, they'l melt instead.
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April 3, 2013 8:18:56 PM

...plastic burns...it burns and that causes it to melt. I say again...plastic BURNS.
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April 3, 2013 8:29:31 PM

Okay, shake your dicks, pissing contest is over.
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April 3, 2013 9:06:47 PM

Not a pissing contest. It's a matter between telling people false things. This isn't just wrong compatibility...it's telling someone a material that is quite flammable will not burn...quite a big difference.
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February 28, 2014 9:33:16 AM

The ratio of non-flammable materials to flammable materials in most PC's is pretty high. I'd concur with others in saying the biggest risk is from the PS. Only the PS and maybe the PS wiring harness, have enough fuel to maintain a fire for more than a few seconds. In %99 of cases the fire would be contained within the metal PS housing and computer case. That being said, obviously an all-metal case would be safer than one that relies largely on plastic. Look for UL and a slew of international listings on a quality power supply: if a piece of unlisted equipment causes a house fire and is determined to be the cause, your homeowner's insurance may refuse to pay out (or so I'm told). I've had a few fizzles, pops, and stinky PS failures over the years, One of them was hazardous, Back in the late 80's when Suns were all the rage (and $60,00o a pop), I cobbled together a Sun 3/160 based on the large VME format (each board was about 16 X 16 inches). I was able to get hold of a VME card cage, but no housing for it. While I was sitting near it, a small orange tantalum capacitor shorted and popped, ejecting a small ember that landed on my shirt sleeve. I don't think it burned me, but it put a nice hole about the diameter of a pencil in one of my favorite polyester shirts. If it had been near something just a bit more flammable, it certainly could have started a fire. And if the cage was properly housed, it would have been contained. Open mining rigs present a somewhat greater risk of fire than do typical desktops. Keep them away from curtains and other things easily ignited.
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