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What's a good graphics card for a 46" 1080p 120 hz display for gaming and video editing?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 4, 2013 2:20:31 PM

I currently have an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 with a 32 inch 720p display with a resolution of 1360x768. I just purchased a 46" 1080p 120HZ tv, and I saw some problems:
1) my graphics card didn't support 120Hz
2) Things got REALLY choppy when I watched HD videos.

I returned the TV and decided to spend the money instead on a better graphics card, and then later buy a new TV.

I want to stick with NVIDIA because I've heard that they are more compatible with Adobe Premiere (unless that's not true). I also use it for gaming. My price range is $200-400. Would it be possible to use my current video card, plus another? I have a large enough tower and room on my mobo plus enough power. I just don't know how that works.

Thanks!
a b U Graphics card
April 4, 2013 2:29:01 PM

For the bottom end, a 660 costs around $200, for $400 a 670. I would say hit the middle ground and go with a 660 Ti. For Price/Performance it's on par with cards around that price range. You could use your current card as dedicated Physx with your new card. I don't really know how to use this and it only makes a difference on games that actually use Physx. I can't speak for any video editing applications however.
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/647?vs=598
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a c 358 U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
April 4, 2013 2:40:58 PM

A 120Hz HDTV does not operate the same way as a 120Hz monitor. A 120Hz HDTV only accepts 60Hz input. Using video interpolation, the HDTV doubles the number of output frames. The purpose is primarily for smooth movie playback. This can cause input lag because it takes a little bit of time to create each interpolated frame.

See my response in the following thread for a more detailed explanation:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-1638198/1080-120hz...
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April 4, 2013 2:52:17 PM

mace200200 said:
For the bottom end, a 660 costs around $200, for $400 a 670. I would say hit the middle ground and go with a 660 Ti. For Price/Performance it's on par with cards around that price range. You could use your current card as dedicated Physx with your new card. I don't really know how to use this and it only makes a difference on games that actually use Physx. I can't speak for any video editing applications however.
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/647?vs=598


jaguarskx said:
A 120Hz HDTV does not operate the same way as a 120Hz monitor. A 120Hz HDTV only accepts 60Hz input. Using video interpolation, the HDTV doubles the number of output frames. The purpose is primarily for smooth movie playback. This can cause input lag because it takes a little bit of time to create each interpolated frame.

See my response in the following thread for a more detailed explanation:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-1638198/1080-120hz...


Good read. Thank you. So, is it basically a bad idea to get a 1080p television to use as a monitor for my computer? Right now I have a 32" 720p monitor, and I never really notice major lag or anything. Would it be worse if I got the GTX 660ti plus a 1080p monitor, or about the same. Should I not worry about 120 HZ on buying a new tv?
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a b U Graphics card
April 4, 2013 4:55:27 PM

I've never used a TV as a monitor, many people have, the pixels on a TV are spaced differently than a computer monitor and some people say it bothers them if they're to close to it. What I get from his post that a 120hz tv will run at 60hz. What the refresh rate is how fast the image is flashed to the screen. What this means for games is even if your getting 80fps, it's really only displaying 60fps if your using a 60hz screen. On a 120hz screen it can display up to 120fps. So, for one thing you'll be running a 120hz monitor effectively at 60hz. The second, it seems like interpolation will cause a small amount of lag on the image. That's how I understand it anyway, I never looked this up until today.

Anyway, if you don't want a TV anymore, I would just buy a 1080p 60hz computer monitor, I can kind of see the difference between 120hz and 60hz, but to me it doesn't justify the extra cost. If you buy a 120hz monitor, it shouldn't have the lag issues since only the TVs do the interpolation thing.
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May 6, 2013 3:43:58 PM

unceasingFaun said:

I want to stick with NVIDIA because I've heard that they are more compatible with Adobe Premiere (unless that's not true). I also use it for gaming. My price range is $200-400. Would it be possible to use my current video card, plus another? I have a large enough tower and room on my mobo plus enough power. I just don't know how that works.
Thanks!

Then this is very important: Then you will not want to get ANY of the 600 series cards. Nvidia has also moved away from GPU computing. If you look at the current most powerful offering from Nvidia and AMD the 690 generally flunked those scores (with flying colors), the 7990 beat out the 690, the Quadro's and AMD's own FirePro's. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-hd-7990-revi... Nvidia now does so bad in this category that even the cheapest AMD 7000 series card will beat the best 600 series Nvidia card in any compute type benchmarks that aren't directly related to gaming.

Compute used to be one of Nvidia's strong points. They say they moved away from it on their 600 series cards to focus more on gaming which think is a mistake (and quite possibly a lie). Not everyone wants to buy two separate specialized computers to do everything they need to do and everything they want to do.

For whatever reason Adobe Photoshop/Premiere only supports openCL on Apple computers (which also pisses me off) and not PC's so a good Nvidia card used to be the card to buy. Now people that want to game and use Photoshop to the best of their ability's on the same PC are buying the older 500 series cards when they would rather have something more recent.

So if a card for Adobe Photoshop/Premiere is important to you and you don't want to buy an overpriced workstation card you will not want to buy any of the Nvidia 600 series cards. Your only choices here (with the exception of joining the church of Jobs) are to buy a older Nvidia card like a GTX 580 or find some editing software that supports AMD's openCL.

Edit: Although it appears that Adobe Premiere Pro and AMD have teamed up to bring support for the open standard to Windows with the software's next version.
Articles: http://www.engadget.com/2013/04/06/adobe-premiere-pro-w...
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6881/opencl-support-comin...
So IMO AMD is the only reasonable choice for your new card.
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