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New in computer building. Some expert advise to improve my list would be wonderful. (~$1300)

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  • SSD
  • Computers
  • Sapphire
  • Motherboards
  • CPUs
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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April 5, 2013 5:06:16 AM

Hi,

Here is my current thought:

CPU: 3770K
MB: Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H
GPU: Sapphire 7970 Vapor-X
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 8gb
HDD: (already have one)
SDD: Samsung 128gb
Fan: CM Hyper 212 EVO
Case: CM Storm Stryker

I am only a beginner and this is the furthest I could get to. I do have some questions and want to seek some advise:

1. Graphics - I've read tons of comparison/discussion/flaming between 7970 and 670. I am currently settle with Sapphire 7970 Vapor-X instead of Dual-X/Gigabyte7970/EVGA670FTW. Will this card going to be noisy? (All my previous cards were EVGA)

2. CPU - Do I really need to go for 3770K, I am going to do mostly gaming and Solidworks. Will 3570K do the work? Is it a waste of money to get 3770K?

3. MB - There are two boards available, Z77X-D3H and Z77X-UD3H. With my build, did I made a good decision to go with UD3H? Or I should stick with D3H (it's $50 cheaper!)

4. RAM - I think 8gb is enough. I am only using one screen (1900x1200) currently. Kingston is only $10 cheaper, so I just decided to go for Corsair Vengeance.

5. SSD - I just know about the existence of SDD two weeks ago. Don't know much about it. Is Samsung a good brand for SDD?

FINALLY, thanks for reading my post and I would be thankful if you could provide some advise and insight to my build. I hope you have a nice day. Feel free to type as much text as you want to. I WILL read all of them and take any constructive suggestions :) 

=EDIT= Totally forgot about PSU. I am planning to do some OC on both CPU and GPU. Just for fun (and why not), won't be OC-ing too serious. What power supply would fit my build? 550W maybe not enough if I OC? 600W or 620/650W? And also is there a noticeable difference between bronze (Antec) and gold (Corsair) PSU.

More about : computer building expert advise improve list wonderful 1300

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April 5, 2013 5:26:26 AM

1.
I have never really seen the card live, I dunno about if it is really noisy...but...
Noisy is relative. I usually tend to ignore noise for high-classed GPUs...I would rather pay attention to performance and price instead of noisy or something.
..and...I wouldn't mind having them noisy...I use my headphones during games...I almost do not hear anything else but the game...

2.
Basically 3570k is already more than enough for most of today heavy games but I dunno about the future.
I heard already that Crysis 3 seems to gain a bit advantage on 3770 than 3570. My opinion is that 3770 should have better future but you need to invest more.
Note: most games nowadays show no improvements a.k.a perform the same on 3770 and on 3570.

3. Between UD3H and D3H, read carefully on the spec just in case you missed certain features you want or need before going for the cheaper one. If you are not going to use certain features, it is best to go for cheaper options.
Just be careful about using the features in the future since there is no way you can get something which is not available on the board.

4. I would have chosen the cheapest one. No big difference to which brand the RAM is coming from.

5. SSD is an optional part which will increase the performance of your system tremendously. I would say, get it if you can afford it. Yes, Samsung is one of the best SSD manufacturers. SSD with 128GB or bigger will be adviceable.

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a c 148 V Motherboard
a c 143 à CPUs
April 5, 2013 5:33:23 AM

That will be a nice build.
1. For a single card, I would probably choose the HD7970, unless Solidworks can be accelerated by nVidia's CUDA. If you plan at some point to run multiple cards (shouldn't be needed for a single 1920x1200 monitor), get the GTX670 because Crossfire is apparently badly broken, although AMD may have fixes in July.
2. I do not know enough about Solidworks to know how much it will benefit from the i7. For games, it is probably unnecessary.
3. If it were me, I'd buy the better board. I believe Gigabyte's "Ultra Durable" component selections are enough more than just marketing BS to be worthwhile, especially if you're building this system to last. If you aren't, i.e. you expect to replace it in a year or two, get the cheaper board (as long as it has the features you want).
4. 8GB should be enough. You might want to check out low profile RAM (Crucial, Samsung, and G.Skill, among others, have some) to be sure it won't block your cooler.
5. The Samsung 840 Pro is better that the regular 840; but yes, Samsung is a good choice. Crucial is another. I would suggest at least 128GB.
And finally, don't neglect the PSU! I would suggest a quality unit in the 500W-550W range, such as anything made by Seasonic (e.g. their own, XFX, or some PC Power & Cooling), Delta (some Antec), FSP (their own, some Antec), or Super Flower (Rosewill Capstone, some Kingwin).
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a b à CPUs
April 5, 2013 5:36:07 AM

1- you don't really need i7-3770k for gaming , i5-3570k will get you great gaming performance and you'll save money also.
2- 8gb of ram is enough
3- SSD samsung depends on the version you've got ... the pro series is better more powerful, but if you don't have pro it doesn't worth it

maybe you could consider this :

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.19 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: A-Data Premier Pro SP600 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($403.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Stryker (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($169.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($75.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.96 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1289.01
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-04-05 08:44 EDT-0400)

and tell me what you think
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April 5, 2013 6:00:01 AM

ugh. XFX is bad. go gigabyte, asus, or sapphire. (XFX is bad in comparison, I mean. just loud and inefficient at cooling. gigabyte maybe loud at 100% fans, but it's the best cooler I've seen short of water)
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a b à CPUs
April 5, 2013 6:05:44 AM

CarolKarine said:
ugh. XFX is bad. go gigabyte, asus, or sapphire. (XFX is bad in comparison, I mean. just loud and inefficient at cooling. gigabyte maybe loud at 100% fans, but it's the best cooler I've seen short of water)


MY BAD:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($139.19 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($64.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: A-Data Premier Pro SP600 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($104.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($389.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Stryker (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($169.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($75.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.96 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1275.02
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-04-05 09:05 EDT-0400)

I edited it ... is this better ?
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a c 148 V Motherboard
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April 5, 2013 6:20:15 AM

I have owned three recent XFX video cards. None were audible during games. I could hear them, but they were not obnoxious, when benchmarking. They were not the "Core" editions though, but "DD" versions. They have worked well.
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April 5, 2013 6:31:00 AM

well, the gigabyte is also cheaper :/ 
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a c 148 V Motherboard
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April 5, 2013 6:39:43 AM

I have read negative review comments about the "Core" models, and I know some other companies' "base" models are lower quality than their good stuff (HIS is another great example when it comes to fan quality).
I've read some good things about the Windforce cooler that Gigabyte uses, and I've heard clips of it in reviews; it's not obnoxious either, and it cools well too.
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April 5, 2013 8:51:28 AM

guanyu210379 said:
1.
I have never really seen the card live, I dunno about if it is really noisy...but...
Noisy is relative...


Thanks!

Onus said:

1. For a single card, I would probably choose the HD7970, unless Solidworks can be accelerated by nVidia's CUDA. If you plan at some point to run multiple cards (shouldn't be needed for a single 1920x1200 monitor), get the GTX670 because Crossfire is apparently badly broken, although AMD may have fixes in July.


I will probably stick with one card for quite a while. HD7970 should last at least 3 years until it is outdated I think?


Onus said:

3. If it were me, I'd buy the better board. I believe Gigabyte's "Ultra Durable" component selections are enough more than just marketing BS to be worthwhile, especially if you're building this system to last. If you aren't, i.e. you expect to replace it in a year or two, get the cheaper board (as long as it has the features you want).
4. 8GB should be enough. You might want to check out low profile RAM (Crucial, Samsung, and G.Skill, among others, have some) to be sure it won't block your cooler.
5. The Samsung 840 Pro is better that the regular 840; but yes, Samsung is a good choice. Crucial is another. I would suggest at least 128GB.
And finally, don't neglect the PSU! I would suggest a quality unit in the 500W-550W range, such as anything made by Seasonic (e.g. their own, XFX, or some PC Power & Cooling), Delta (some Antec), FSP (their own, some Antec), or Super Flower (Rosewill Capstone, some Kingwin).


Ahh I see. Thanks for the advise!

Onus said:

And finally, don't neglect the PSU! I would suggest a quality unit in the 500W-550W range, such as anything made by Seasonic (e.g. their own, XFX, or some PC Power & Cooling), Delta (some Antec), FSP (their own, some Antec), or Super Flower (Rosewill Capstone, some Kingwin).


Yes... totally forgot the PSU :p 

I do have a question about PSU. I DO plan to do some OC on both CPU and GPU. Do I need to get a 600W or even 620/650W?

And also, I read posts for the difference between bronze and gold PSU. What is the actual difference? (I know it is about efficiency, but in which way/situation I would actually notice a difference?)

@yasserBasha thanks but sadly I am currently out of the state and there's no Amazon/Newegg in my working region @___@ Missing the 2-day AMAZ Prime shipping a lot >__<
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a c 148 V Motherboard
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April 5, 2013 9:05:27 AM

According to the PSU Calculator at http://www.extreme.outervision.com/PSUEngine you'll need 500W with some overclocking, based on my assumptions about number of fans, drives, and allowing for some capacitor aging.
The actual, visible difference between bronze and gold is only a few percent. The non-visible differences may include some otherwise better parts, and a little less heat. If Seasonic makes it though, it's going to be good no matter which one it is.
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April 5, 2013 9:08:09 AM

So what is the visible difference? My electricity bill?
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a c 148 V Motherboard
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April 5, 2013 9:16:05 AM

Yes, a tiny difference in your electricity bill; probably not even twenty five cents a month, depending on how much you use your PC.
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April 5, 2013 9:21:52 AM

Haha I see. (Then I wonder why they make those gold PSU @__@ Just because it is more efficient and people will just get one because of the hack of it? They are stable anyway right?)

Thanks for the help. I really appreciate it :) 
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a c 148 V Motherboard
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April 5, 2013 9:33:20 AM

It makes no sense to upgrade from Bronze to Gold, but if you're buying new, and the price difference isn't huge, I'd buy the Gold one. It seems to me that most of the 80+ Gold PSUs are made by Seasonic anyway, or Superflower. There are still some crappy Bronze units out there (e.g. Coolermaster GX-650), but afaik the worst you'll likely get from a Gold is it won't quite hit that level of efficiency in actual use (80plus tests at an unrealistically chilly 23C); Seasonics will though.
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