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Can Dell XPS 630i Support GTX650 Ti card

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 5, 2013 10:43:47 AM

I have heard that thw wattage on the PSU is not the only thing that matters when determining if a CPU can support a graphics card.

What other factors matter? My current specs of my CPU are here with pictures

http://www.trustedreviews.com/Dell-XPS-630-Gaming-PC_De...

http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/desktop/f/3...

The graphic card specifications are here:

http://www.bestbuy.ca/en-CA/product/gigabyte-gigabyte-n...

Any help would be appreciated.
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April 5, 2013 11:09:18 AM

yours can handle it, your pci e slots are 2.0, but 3.0 cards will work in 2.0 slots. if you have enough power from the psu (which you should), itll work just fine.
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April 5, 2013 12:00:55 PM

The GTX 650 Ti will work. You already have a more power hungry GTX 8800 SLI setup, so the more power efficient newer card will work.

The only other consideration would be bottlenecking from your CPU and other system components. I don't think this will be much of an issue as your are choosing a modest video card. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.
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April 5, 2013 12:13:27 PM

carowden said:
yours can handle it, your pci e slots are 2.0, but 3.0 cards will work in 2.0 slots. if you have enough power from the psu (which you should), itll work just fine.


17seconds said:
The GTX 650 Ti will work. You already have a more power hungry GTX 8800 SLI setup, so the more power efficient newer card will work.

The only other consideration would be bottlenecking from your CPU and other system components. I don't think this will be much of an issue as your are choosing a modest video card. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.


i didn't have a picture of what my CPU looks like so it is one that i found online. my current graphics card is GTX 8800. Does this change anything at all?
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April 5, 2013 12:19:47 PM

gerboli said:
carowden said:
yours can handle it, your pci e slots are 2.0, but 3.0 cards will work in 2.0 slots. if you have enough power from the psu (which you should), itll work just fine.


17seconds said:
The GTX 650 Ti will work. You already have a more power hungry GTX 8800 SLI setup, so the more power efficient newer card will work.

The only other consideration would be bottlenecking from your CPU and other system components. I don't think this will be much of an issue as your are choosing a modest video card. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.


i didn't have a picture of what my CPU looks like so it is one that i found online. my current graphics card is GTX 8800. Does this change anything at all?

No, the 8800 is a power hungry card. The GTX 650 Ti sips power in comparison. The CPU is a small gamble in terms of bottlenecking, but really not a major concern at all.
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April 5, 2013 12:33:02 PM

17seconds said:
gerboli said:
carowden said:
yours can handle it, your pci e slots are 2.0, but 3.0 cards will work in 2.0 slots. if you have enough power from the psu (which you should), itll work just fine.


17seconds said:
The GTX 650 Ti will work. You already have a more power hungry GTX 8800 SLI setup, so the more power efficient newer card will work.

The only other consideration would be bottlenecking from your CPU and other system components. I don't think this will be much of an issue as your are choosing a modest video card. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.


i didn't have a picture of what my CPU looks like so it is one that i found online. my current graphics card is GTX 8800. Does this change anything at all?

No, the 8800 is a power hungry card. The GTX 650 Ti sips power in comparison. The CPU is a small gamble in terms of bottlenecking, but really not a major concern at all.


What did you mean by this "
. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.

How can bottlnecking be a good thing?


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Best solution

a c 617 U Graphics card
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April 5, 2013 2:00:48 PM

gerboli said:
17seconds said:
gerboli said:
carowden said:
yours can handle it, your pci e slots are 2.0, but 3.0 cards will work in 2.0 slots. if you have enough power from the psu (which you should), itll work just fine.


17seconds said:
The GTX 650 Ti will work. You already have a more power hungry GTX 8800 SLI setup, so the more power efficient newer card will work.

The only other consideration would be bottlenecking from your CPU and other system components. I don't think this will be much of an issue as your are choosing a modest video card. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.


i didn't have a picture of what my CPU looks like so it is one that i found online. my current graphics card is GTX 8800. Does this change anything at all?

No, the 8800 is a power hungry card. The GTX 650 Ti sips power in comparison. The CPU is a small gamble in terms of bottlenecking, but really not a major concern at all.


What did you mean by this "
. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.

How can bottlnecking be a good thing?

Ha ha, I just mean it can be a good problem to have, certainly better than having an underperforming video card.

So, the way you can tell if a CPU is bottlenecking your system is to have a video card monitor running while playing games (Afterburner, GPU-Z). If your GPU usage is running at 99% with VSync turned Off, then you do not have a bottleneck. If your GPU usage is at 50% for example, that means that there is a bottleneck for that particular game somewhere in the system, most likely the CPU.

In the case of a bottleneck, that means you have the overhead available to place more stress on the GPU. So in that case, you get to up the graphics options, by selecting a higher level of antialiasing or higher texture quality, for example. That's a good thing.

Preventing bottlenecking is not an exact science, that's why I don't think there is a lot need to worry about it, unless there is an obvious mismatch with the CPU or if you are considering a very expensive video card. Since you are not thinking of purchasing a GTX 680, I think it's worth the gamble. It's likely not a big deal for you to match an entry-level GTX 650 Ti with an older Core2Duo CPU on your system.
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April 5, 2013 2:06:27 PM

17seconds said:
gerboli said:
17seconds said:
gerboli said:
carowden said:
yours can handle it, your pci e slots are 2.0, but 3.0 cards will work in 2.0 slots. if you have enough power from the psu (which you should), itll work just fine.


17seconds said:
The GTX 650 Ti will work. You already have a more power hungry GTX 8800 SLI setup, so the more power efficient newer card will work.

The only other consideration would be bottlenecking from your CPU and other system components. I don't think this will be much of an issue as your are choosing a modest video card. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.


i didn't have a picture of what my CPU looks like so it is one that i found online. my current graphics card is GTX 8800. Does this change anything at all?

No, the 8800 is a power hungry card. The GTX 650 Ti sips power in comparison. The CPU is a small gamble in terms of bottlenecking, but really not a major concern at all.


What did you mean by this "
. If you do have a problem with bottlenecking, that can be a good thing as it allows you the chance to increase your graphics settings.

How can bottlnecking be a good thing?

Ha ha, I just mean it can be a good problem to have, certainly better than having an underperforming video card.

So, the way you can tell if a CPU is bottlenecking your system is to have a video card monitor running while playing games (Afterburner, GPU-Z). If your GPU usage is running at 99% with VSync turned Off, then you do not have a bottleneck. If your GPU usage is at 50% for example, that means that there is a bottleneck for that particular game somewhere in the system, most likely the CPU.

In the case of a bottleneck, that means you have the overhead available to place more stress on the GPU. So in that case, you get to up the graphics options, by selecting a higher level of antialiasing or higher texture quality, for example. That's a good thing.

Preventing bottlenecking is not an exact science, that's why I don't think there is a lot need to worry about it, unless there is an obvious mismatch with the CPU or if you are considering a very expensive video card. Since you are not thinking of purchasing a GTX 680, I think it's worth the gamble. It's likely not a big deal for you to match an entry-level GTX 650 Ti with an older Core2Duo CPU on your system.


Thanks, I really appreciate your help.
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April 5, 2013 2:13:38 PM

I checked on the Best Buy website you linked for the GTX 650 Ti "Boost", and they didn't have one listed. If you can find one of those, they should cost just a little more than the non-Boost card, but perform about 25% better (assuming you don't have a bottleneck). Best Buy is a little slow to update their inventory with the latest cards.
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GTX_650_Ti_Boos...
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