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Trying to build a good gaming config around 1500EUR

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April 5, 2013 5:47:34 PM

Hello and thanks for reading this,

Since it has been a long time since I last checked news about computer parts, I am lost (so noob level) and in need of help. I'm trying to build a good overall config I could use for some time (but I don't need to play on ultra setting and etc...)

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/OHQk

Please tell me your thoughts about this one, considering I may need the 16Go of ram for some scientific application, and I already have a "data" hard-drive.

I am very unsure about the screen (I'm looking for 1920x1080 screen resolution, with a correct response time) so I'd like you to give me pointers if you know better alternatives.

Also, I was wondering about ram frequencies, is there any point to take higher frequencies since the processor can only support up to 1600MHz ? (To know if I should pick a motherboard supporting higher frequencies)

Finally I didn't know if this motherboard would support sli for a probable later upgrade ?

Thanks in advance for the insights, and sorry for the awkward English !

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April 5, 2013 6:46:48 PM

The build looks solid, and it looks like it would handle what you want it to, but there are a few things that could be improved about it.

The first and simplest improvement is the case itself. The case you picked (Corsair 200R) has no simple way to add fans to the front panel. Low on the front panel is one of the most beneficial places to put a fan with respect to heat. I see that it has two side fans, but those will only complement some good strong intake on the lower front side of any case. The reason for this is most cases have a rear fan located towards the top, as well as a fan on the top, both of which should be set up for exhaust. With the rear and top fans, some intake low and forward is really conducive for airflow. Also, of the two side-fan slots, the one on the top will probably interfere with your CPU heatsink, so it more than likely will be completely useless.
Since it seems to me you are just looking for a simple case to get the job done with no flashy gizmos I would recommend a Cooler Master HAF 912. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Note that the Cooler Master case does not have USB 3.0 input on its front-side panel. So if that is important to you, we can look at other cases.

Secondly, about the memory, for the most part it's been shown that higher frequency memory serves to increase performance, but that increase is so incredibly miniscule it is not noticeable whatsoever to the user. You mentioned scientific application, so if you are running intense algorithms that take a day or more to compute then maybe you are of the 0.1% of people who could stand to benefit from higher frequency RAM.
Regardless, a much stronger determinant of memory speed is the CAS Latency, or CL or CAS for short. The memory you selected has a CAS of 10, which is really bad. What I would strongly recommend for you is a kit like: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
This RAM has a CAS of 7, and meets your 16GB needs. The price is considerably more, but definitely worth it. Also, a more important quality of this particular memory is that it is low-profile. A lot of memory nowadays has flashy heatsinks on it, which serve almost no purpose other than potentially interfering with aftermarket CPU heatsinks. This was a problem a few years ago, and I think most newer motherboards have addressed this clearance issue in their latest models by locating the DIMM slots further away from the CPU socket, but it's still better to be safe than sorry.

As far as your motherboard is concerned, that particular model does not support SLI. It also has some pretty critical reviews. I would go for something like: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
This not only offers SLI and Crossfire, but it offers Quad SLI or Quad Crossfire if needed. Could be useful since you mentioned you wanted longevity. It also has 2x PCI 3.0 x16 slots, which will be useful once GPU developers start to utilize the newer standard.

With your CPU cooler, since you're going with air cooling, I would strongly recommend the Hyper 212 Evo: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
The reason for this is that it is a tried and true heat-dissipating solution. I myself use it, and it is the same price as the one you had picked out. One of the key benefits of this heatsink over the one you picked is that it allows you to attach another fan on the other side of it, allowing for a push-pull fan configuration. This is due to the fact that the grill is a vertical tower above the CPU, and not a horizontally-oriented box. To facilitate this you need to make sure your case will have sufficient clearance, but if you are going to make the switch to the HAF 912 I personally know that it will definitely clear.

As far as your GPU goes, the card itself looks pretty solid. Even though you said you don't need to play on ultra settings, that card should allow you to play ultra on most games as long as your resolution is only going to be 1080p.

As far as the monitor goes I am no expert. It supports 1920x1080 and has HDMI input (=1080p), so it looks good. I think those two qualities are the easiest ways make sure it will give you the video output you want. The next step you'd want to take is to look at the reviews. That particular model has several reviews about dead pixels and a negative comment about the weak stand it comes with. Maybe you'd want to consider shopping around for a bit more for your monitor.

The rest of the things from your build (CPU, PSU & SSD) look like solid choices. I will note that your PSU only comes with 2 PCI-E power connectors (The ones you need for graphics cards) and modern heavyweight graphics cards use two each. So if you want to expand to SLI in the future you'd need to purchase two more 6-pin PCI-E modular power cables for your modular PSU.

Hope this helps!

Important Note: When you make your final purchase, don't forget to purchase the additional fans you will need for your case. For example, the HAF 912 specifies how many fan slots are available on it's "Details" tab on Newegg. At the bottom, under Features, it states:
Cooling System:
-Front: 120 mm fan x 2, 1200 RPM, 17 dBA (one is optional,can be swapped for one 200mm fan)
-Top: 120 mm fan x 2 or 200mm fan x 1(optional)
-Rear: 120 mm fan x 1, 1200 RPM, 17 dBA
-Side:120/140 mm fan x 1 (optional)

Also under the "Details" tab you can find out that it already includes 1x120mm fan on the front and 1x120mm fan on the back. So you would need to purchase 3x120mm fans (2 for the top, one more for the front) and 1x140mm fan (for the side) to polish off the air flow.
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April 6, 2013 12:25:56 AM

Thanks for the very detailed answer ! I guess I'll go snoop around some more for the screen but I'm definitely going to go with your choices !
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April 6, 2013 6:44:20 PM

Actually Tixu, you know, there's another thing that's critically important. I don't know if you've ever done this in the past, but you can't just simply plug your old hard drive into your new computer rig and expect it to work. An operating system is installed relative to a specific motherboard. So whatever system you have installed will not run when you upgrade your motherboard. So if you don't have an operating system installation CD, or any way of getting one, you would need to purchase one. Once you have an operating system installation disc though, you can just hook everything up (including your old hard drive) and install the operating system on your new SSD (which I'm assuming is your plan anyway).

A statement like that might be insulting your intelligence, and I apologize in advance, but I just figured I should point it out just in case.
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April 12, 2013 7:01:15 AM

deadl4st said:
Actually Tixu, you know, there's another thing that's critically important. I don't know if you've ever done this in the past, but you can't just simply plug your old hard drive into your new computer rig and expect it to work. An operating system is installed relative to a specific motherboard. So whatever system you have installed will not run when you upgrade your motherboard. So if you don't have an operating system installation CD, or any way of getting one, you would need to purchase one. Once you have an operating system installation disc though, you can just hook everything up (including your old hard drive) and install the operating system on your new SSD (which I'm assuming is your plan anyway).

A statement like that might be insulting your intelligence, and I apologize in advance, but I just figured I should point it out just in case.


No not at all, I thank you again for taking the time to type this. But yes, the plan was to use the SSD and install the OS on it. I have an unused SATA HDD that I might add just to store music and other stuff.
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