Solved

Can an i5 3570 and i7 3770 (non-k) be unlocked by certain motherboards?

I am asking out of curiosity. Oddly enough, at the moment on newegg, the 3570 ($200) is nearly the same price as the 3570k ($210) so it really isn't a matter of price, just can it be done. The 3770 is also at a similar price on newegg as the 3770k. The k version is $310 and the non-k is $290. It seems like the $10 or $20 you would save getting a locked processor would hurt you in the long run, unless it is possible to unlock them. If it is, I am assuming that it would also void your warranty. So that extra $10-$20 seems much better off spent on an unlocked CPU especially if you plan on overclocking. Also, what are the benefits of a locked CPU, if any? What reason would one choose it over the unlocked one besides price?
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 3570 3770 unlocked motherboards
  1. there is no such reason for opting non k cpus

    1)a person who want to oc the cpu for optimum performance chooses k series cpu

    2)a person doesnot have knowledge of oc and not have interest in oc chooses non k cpu

    + remember k series cpus need higher mobo like z77 to be unlocked so has to spend more on mobos

    there is no specific mobo which can unlock non k cpus.

    Good luck!
  2. Best answer
    You can only OC in P67/Z68/Z75/Z77 mobos - locked chips can be OCed up to 400MHz above each turbo boost step - not much.

    No motherboard can turn a non-K into a K chip - intel cuts a trace on the die with a laser.
  3. The main reason to choose the locked version besides price would be the requirement for Intel vPro (not a concern for home systems) and VT-d (usually not a concern unless you run Hyper-V or ESXi).
  4. You can OC locked chips, just your limited to Turbo boost and some limited tweaking of the baseclock. Nowhere near what you can achieve with a properly unlocked CPU, where you can access the CPU multiplier. You cannot "unlock" a locked chip, unless maybe you want to get tricky and start flashing in your own BIOS to the motherboard (and even that might not work if Someone is right).

    Benefits of a locked CPU.
    - Price is a big one, there often is a much bigger difference in price and H77 boards also cost less than Z77.
    - For some reason on the K series chips, their is a function disabled that helps stabilize virtual machines. So if virtualization is a priority, you have to decide if this function is more important than the extra CPU grunt you can obtain from overclocking.
    - Large scale, say if you had to fill an office building with machines. You want all the machines to be identical to make rolling out changes to them easy, introducing a variable like a changeable clock speed could mess all that up.
  5. GhislainG said:
    The main reason to choose the locked version besides price would be the requirement for Intel vPro (not a concern for home systems) and VT-d (usually not a concern unless you run Hyper-V or ESXi).


    Interesting, I been to the ARK (anyone know what that stands for, if anything?) spec pages for all of these CPUs and never really noticed that the K chips lack these security features. I guess like 'manofchalk' said, these chips are geared more towards a big network of identical machines controlled by one master computer; an office or maybe a computer lab in a school. vPro, VT-d and I also noticed Trusted Execution Tech. all are security features that make it easier to remote access the PC without having to go through the OS. The PC doesn't even have to be powered on according to an article I found about vPro from a google search:

    "... it is not only possible to control a remote PC, but also to start it up and—even more amazingly—log in and perform certain functions even if the OS is corrupted or missing. That's because the vPro engine/platform is available at a very low system level."

    http://www.ruggedpcreview.com/mt/archives/2010/05/intel_vpro_tech.html

    Good article, terrible spell check.

    This just makes the issue of price seem even more perplexing to me now. If the non-k chips have MORE features, doesn't it cost Intel MORE money to implement them? And as for the fact that the more expensive chip is "unlocked", according to 'Someone Somewhere' Intel is simply "cutting a trace on the die with a laser" to lock it. So, not only is it exactly the same chip as the K version, they spend more time and labor on it severing the trace to lock it and whatever they have to do to add the three extra security features... then they charge less. I do know of the concept of binning chips that have minor defects but can be salvaged. Is this what is happening? Or are they taking a perfectly healthy k chip and locking it then replacing the part they locked with security features? If so, then I see why they charge so much more for their products than AMD does.
  6. No - the selection of traces they cut determines which chip it is. The 3570, 3570K, 3770 etc are all the same quad-core Ivy die, but some have HD4000 vs HD2500 vs no iGPU, some OCable, some with faster clock rates, some with HyperThreading. (EDIT: Xeons are also made from the same die, but with ECC and other features turned on)

    AMD and nVidia do the same with GPUs.
  7. Someone Somewhere said:
    No - the selection of traces they cut determines which chip it is. The 3570, 3570K, 3770 etc are all the same quad-core Ivy die, but some have HD4000 vs HD2500 vs no iGPU, some OCable, some with faster clock rates, some with HyperThreading. (EDIT: Xeons are also made from the same die, but with ECC and other features turned on)

    AMD and nVidia do the same with GPUs.


    So, in the Sandy Bridge line, everything from the 8-core Xenon E5-2650 to the 2-core i3's, Pentiums etc. all start out as the same exact chip? I'm guessing this is how the Ivy Bridge line works as well. To make a 3770k they remove the security features. To make a 3770, they remove the overclocking features. To make a 3570k they remove some cache, the security features and hyper-threading. To make a 3570, they remove overclocking, some cache and part of the GPU. An on and on. That makes more sense from a financial point of view on Intel's part. I always thought the i7's, i5's, i3's, Pentiums and Celerons were each a different design and the only reason they grouped them into the Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge group was their 32nm or 22nm die size.
  8. Nearly - I believe they have dual- and quad-core dies. So a Celeron, Pentium, and i3, along with some Xeons, are all the same chip.

    Edit: The Sany/Ivy name is a series name for the architecture.
Ask a new question

Read More

Intel i7 Intel i5 Motherboards CPUs