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Laptop GPU (640M LE) overheating issue

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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April 8, 2013 7:41:13 AM

Hi, I have strange problem with my half a year old Lenovo Y480 laptop. Whenever I run any game with my GPU, the Nvidia 640M LE, the card heats up to 95 degrees celsius almost immediately (ie within a minute). The games themselves are not graphically intensive at all, eg. Civilization IV on low settings, as they run perfectly with my integrated card (intel 4000) without any heating issues on the cpu or motherboard (~70C checked using Speedfan and HWmonitor). I know that the 640M LE is not a great card, but I think that heating up to 95C on games that do not even need a dedicated card in a matter of minutes is totally not normal...

I updated the drivers after I noticed the problem, but it didn't fix the issue, so I uninstalled and switched back to the old one. I wonder if it's a dust problem or something.

It would be great if someone gave me advice on how to fix this.
April 8, 2013 7:57:02 AM

You do know that around 90 to 95 degrees is pretty common in laptops graphics cards right?
You can always improve this by using a cooling pad and by cleaning the ventilation duct, but you have to get used to hotter components on laptops: you cant cool efficiently using a freaking tiny 60mm fan.
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April 8, 2013 8:10:22 AM

azraa said:
You do know that around 90 to 95 degrees is pretty common in laptops graphics cards right?
You can always improve this by using a cooling pad and by cleaning the ventilation duct, but you have to get used to hotter components on laptops: you cant cool efficiently using a freaking tiny 60mm fan.


Thank you for your answer. Yes, I do know that laptop gpus can handle higher temperatures. But I think 95 degrees under any sort of load is still too high, considering that the applications I ran can be ran without problem on any other card with a fraction of the processing power of my card. How can I clean the laptop though?
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April 8, 2013 8:25:16 AM

While laptops do get hotter than desktops, 95 does seem a tad on the warm side.
Step one would be blowing it out, as that is the most common cause of overheating. It is best to use something like canned air, or an air compressor. However that runs the risk of damaging the fan due to over speeding, so i usually like to stop the fan with a ziptie (or other plastic thing), but looking at pictures online it doesn't seem like you would be able to fit a ziptie in. You can however try blowing both directions yourself, and see if a large amount of dust comes out, that could indicate that you might want to pursue cleaning it out further (perhaps taking it apart).
When your GPU is running 95C, is the air coming out very very hot, like, can't-hold-you-hand-in-the-air, hot? (this would be proper). If the air is cool to warmish, then there is a possibility it is not cooling properly, such as thermal paste not properly applied, but I would imagine the chances of this are slim.
And in general, make sure when its sitting, that the fan is blocked (like setting it on your leg or a pillow). Whenever I am gaming on my laptop, I always find a small book or similar thing to place under the back, and that assures that the fan is pulling maximum amount of air (sometimes I feel like the rubber feet simply aren't tall enough, and therefore wont let the fan have enough air). And like the other poster said, a laptop cooling stand would likely help a bit, too.
(disclaimer, these are my opinions based on my experiences, I could be wrong on some things)

Best of luck!
-Connor
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April 8, 2013 11:09:16 AM

cdburner5911 said:
While laptops do get hotter than desktops, 95 does seem a tad on the warm side.
Step one would be blowing it out, as that is the most common cause of overheating. It is best to use something like canned air, or an air compressor. However that runs the risk of damaging the fan due to over speeding, so i usually like to stop the fan with a ziptie (or other plastic thing), but looking at pictures online it doesn't seem like you would be able to fit a ziptie in. You can however try blowing both directions yourself, and see if a large amount of dust comes out, that could indicate that you might want to pursue cleaning it out further (perhaps taking it apart).
When your GPU is running 95C, is the air coming out very very hot, like, can't-hold-you-hand-in-the-air, hot? (this would be proper). If the air is cool to warmish, then there is a possibility it is not cooling properly, such as thermal paste not properly applied, but I would imagine the chances of this are slim.
And in general, make sure when its sitting, that the fan is blocked (like setting it on your leg or a pillow). Whenever I am gaming on my laptop, I always find a small book or similar thing to place under the back, and that assures that the fan is pulling maximum amount of air (sometimes I feel like the rubber feet simply aren't tall enough, and therefore wont let the fan have enough air). And like the other poster said, a laptop cooling stand would likely help a bit, too.
(disclaimer, these are my opinions based on my experiences, I could be wrong on some things)

Best of luck!
-Connor


I don't have to tools to open the back cover of my laptop right now, but is there even a fan for my gpu specifically? The air coming out of the main fan is fairly warm, but not nearly as hot as the back cover of the laptop and maybe even the keyboard. I'll need to open the laptop before knowing what's going on. Thanks for the response.
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April 8, 2013 3:51:24 PM

beethoven123 said:
I don't have to tools to open the back cover of my laptop right now, but is there even a fan for my gpu specifically? The air coming out of the main fan is fairly warm, but not nearly as hot as the back cover of the laptop and maybe even the keyboard. I'll need to open the laptop before knowing what's going on. Thanks for the response.


I believe it has only one fan. And I did some googling, and it looks like that particular model overheating is a common problem, and it seems the consensus is that there is far too much thermal paste applied). If you were particularly tech savvy, and feeling adventurous, you could take it apart and reapply the thermal paste, however this would likely void your warranty. I suppose you could also send it in for repairs, but that could be slow/cost. Or you could buy a laptop cooling pad and hope for the best.

Sorry I can't be of more help.
-Connor
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