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SSD and HDD

Last response: in Windows 7
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April 8, 2013 10:30:03 PM

Hello

I have 2 drives. One SSD (120gb) and one HDD (1TB) and plan on purchasing another HDD in the near future.

I will be doing a fresh re install of Windows 7 onto the SSD.

My question is, how does the OS work between the drives ?

For example, I want the OS on the SSD, games on the other and documents/pictures etc on the other drive. Do I just install the OS on the SSD, then install programs like Steam and Origin on the other ?

The thing I am confused about is where do they install to since it will be an empty drive ?

Since these usually install to F:\Program Files (x86)\Steam" will they install to "F:\Steam"

Sorry if you are confused about what I am asking.

Thanks in advance :) 

More about : ssd hdd

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a b $ Windows 7
April 8, 2013 10:39:44 PM

That's exactly how it works.

What you do is when you install a game, or steam, or whatever, you just install it to the F: drive by selecting the "custom install" option.
Then it will just install to F:\ whatever drive path you put steam into\Steam\SteamApps\Common, just like normal.

You'll also have the option, when you install games within steam, to install them to the F drive or a new directory on the SSD, so you can put the ones that would get a benefit from it on the SSD.

For games, it works the same way - just chose custom install and the folder. (I would put a 'games' folder in the F drive for a few reasons - one to keep things organized, and two for the point following.)

Origin, being freaking STUPID and from EA, has more issues. For example, you can't install it, or games, to a different drive than the one your OS is on. You also can't install it to the root folder of a drive, meaning you can't have "C:\Origin," you have to have "C:\pointless folder\Origin."
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April 8, 2013 10:43:11 PM

Yes that is how you do it. You do a fresh install of the OS on the SSD and then when doing the installation of the games/apps on the HD, just make sure you select the correct HD to put it on (i.e. D:, E:, F:, whatever it is). This way you have a snappy boot time and generally good movement within the OS. I'd recommend to upgrade the SSD to 240-256 gb's if you have the $, but the 120 gb SSD will do for the OS, a few games (if not too big), and some apps (mainly I'd use Microsoft Office there). I would make sure that I don't go over 80% of capacity on the SSD, because you usually start to get a slightly degraded speeds once you go over that threshold (~85-90 gb's on a 120 gb SSD).
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April 8, 2013 10:43:37 PM

DarkSable said:
That's exactly how it works.

What you do is when you install a game, or steam, or whatever, you just install it to the F: drive by selecting the "custom install" option.
Then it will just install to F:\ whatever drive path you put steam into\Steam\SteamApps\Common, just like normal.

You'll also have the option, when you install games within steam, to install them to the F drive or a new directory on the SSD, so you can put the ones that would get a benefit from it on the SSD.

For games, it works the same way - just chose custom install and the folder. (I would put a 'games' folder in the F drive for a few reasons - one to keep things organized, and two for the point following.)

Origin, being freaking STUPID and from EA, has more issues. For example, you can't install it, or games, to a different drive than the one your OS is on. You also can't install it to the root folder of a drive, meaning you can't have "C:\Origin," you have to have "C:\pointless folder\Origin."


Thanks so much! Means a lot :) )))
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a b $ Windows 7
April 8, 2013 10:43:38 PM

I'm not sure what you are asking. Let me tell you my setup. My OS sits on an old 250GB Seagate 7200.10 drive. My steam folder sits on an Samsung 128GB 470 drive. I have 3 other mechanical drives holding other media.

If you start from scratch I don't see you having any issues. Install your OS on a drive, Steam on another. When you go to install a game through steam now it will ask you where you want to install it. I picked my SSD for the better load times. But you can pick any drive.
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a b $ Windows 7
April 8, 2013 10:44:54 PM

Brad_543 said:
Thanks so much! Means a lot :) )))


Glad I could help!

It's kinda confusing when you first switch from having one drive or partition to multiple. Soon, however, you'll be addicted and join the rest of us zombies. ;) 

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April 8, 2013 10:44:55 PM

lunyone said:
Yes that is how you do it. You do a fresh install of the OS on the SSD and then when doing the installation of the games/apps on the HD, just make sure you select the correct HD to put it on (i.e. D:, E:, F:, whatever it is). This way you have a snappy boot time and generally good movement within the OS. I'd recommend to upgrade the SSD to 240-256 gb's if you have the $, but the 120 gb SSD will do for the OS, a few games (if not too big), and some apps (mainly I'd use Microsoft Office there). I would make sure that I don't go over 80% of capacity on the SSD, because you usually start to get a slightly degraded speeds once you go over that threshold (~85-90 gb's on a 120 gb SSD).


Thanks! I'll make sure I don't go over 80%

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April 8, 2013 10:49:22 PM

Brad_543 said:
lunyone said:
Yes that is how you do it. You do a fresh install of the OS on the SSD and then when doing the installation of the games/apps on the HD, just make sure you select the correct HD to put it on (i.e. D:, E:, F:, whatever it is). This way you have a snappy boot time and generally good movement within the OS. I'd recommend to upgrade the SSD to 240-256 gb's if you have the $, but the 120 gb SSD will do for the OS, a few games (if not too big), and some apps (mainly I'd use Microsoft Office there). I would make sure that I don't go over 80% of capacity on the SSD, because you usually start to get a slightly degraded speeds once you go over that threshold (~85-90 gb's on a 120 gb SSD).


Thanks! I'll make sure I don't go over 80%



You can install the OS on the standard HD and all of your games on the SSD if you like, but I do like to have quick boot times from a cold start (sorta get used to it). It's up to you on how you want to do it, but I like the OS, a few games (that I mostly use), and Office on the SSD for quick load times. It makes the computing experience better, IMHO.
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April 9, 2013 3:47:48 PM

You can also use "mount points" like in the Unix world. i.e. Create an empty folder on your boot drive something like C:\Mount or C:\Games then in disk management, right click on your secondary drive and do the "change drive letter and paths" option and add a "mount to the following empty NTFS Folder".

That way games that demand to be installed on your boot drive should be happy, and you won't be filling up your boot drive. If its confusing having "F:\" and "C:\Games" be the same place, you can always delete the drive letter.
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