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Erroneous CPU temperature readings?

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April 9, 2013 3:42:15 PM

I've got an HP Probook laptop running an Intel i3 cpu at 2.27Ghz. It also has 6GB of RAM. The unit took a fall, and subsequently the touchpad and audio are not working.

I haven't gotten to them yet, but currently my problem is that the unit acts like it's overheating under load. I did manage to install Win71s service pack, but it shutdown trying to do the follow up updating.

I monitored it using the System Information for Windows program, and it showed temps as high as 89d C. It's understandable, then, that the unit would shut itself off, but the problem is that it actually feels cool to the touch over the processor area. To some degree the fan seems to have a mind of its own, accelerating for no discernible reason - So I'm wondering if it's possible that the fall did something to the CPU's temperature sensor, and what the best way to deal with this is. I'm suspecting a CPU replacement.

Thanks.
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April 9, 2013 4:05:49 PM

A CPU replacement would be complicated, and it may not even be the CPU at all.
If it's under warranty, return it. But I doubt this would be covered.
What you can do is give it to an asian service/repair shop, and they could give a good bargain.
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April 9, 2013 4:11:51 PM

I doubt the CPU replacement would be complicated, but I am not sure whether it would solve the problem. The repair services I would much prefer not to use - in fact, will not use.
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April 9, 2013 9:46:04 PM

paul1149 said:
I doubt the CPU replacement would be complicated, but I am not sure whether it would solve the problem. The repair services I would much prefer not to use - in fact, will not use.


Yeah, I guess your right. But you can't generalise those asian repairs - some of them really know their stuff. But this will likely void any current warranties you have on the notebook.

The thing is, replacing a CPU requires soldering, and depending on the motherboard, it cannot be done. Most laptops these days come with CPUs soldered onto the motherboard - especially in this day and age of portable products, and your Probook in particular.

From the above reasons, a CPU replacement will be complicated and not worth the effort. Not to mention the costs involved for a new CPU as well as the service (you're looking at $250+).

Either you return it, or buy a new computer unfortunately. Well I guess the third option would be to deal with the current problems - but I doubt you'd want that.

Hope this helps. :) 
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April 10, 2013 9:19:34 AM

I've only come across soldered CPUs in netbooks, but downloading the SM here, my model, 6450b, is suspiciously absent from the replacement CPU parts list. IAC, I've determined to deal with this problem the right way, step by step. I'll take it apart and examine the MB. BW.
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April 10, 2013 8:02:05 PM

Good idea.

Could you please select a solution. Thanks :) 
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