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Help with building a gaming PC, $1,800 - $2,200 Australian Dollars

Approximate Purchase Date: Within a month from now.
Budget Range: $1,800 - $2,200 AUD after shipping. That said, the ideal situation would be the best possible specs for around the center point, at $2000.
System Usage from Most to Least Important: Mid-high level gaming, video editing, 3d rendering, browsing with a few dozen tabs open, and running game servers. (Nothing big, just 3 - 10 clients for home LAN parties.) Probably not all at once. I think. XD
Are you buying a monitor: Nope.
Parts to Upgrade: A complete tower + mouse and keyboard.
Do you need to buy OS: No
Preferred Website(s) for Parts: At the moment I'd like to get everything through pccasegear.com to minimize shipping costs as I live in north west Australia away from any cities, but if you can find something so cheap that it negates extra shipping costs or has free shipping I'd love to hear it.
Location: Derby, Western Australia.
Parts Preferences: I prefer Intel and Nvidia over AMD if possible.
Overclocking: Maybe, but I haven't done it before so likely not much.
SLI or Crossfire: No. Single Vcard.
Your Monitor Resolution: 1680x1050
Reason for upgrade: PSU is making suspicious whining noises, current computer is 5 years old and was never built for much more than browsing and editing documents to begin with. 'Nuff said.
Additional Comments: This will be my first build, unless tinkering with the innards of old PCs 6 years ago counts. (As in, computers that were 5 years old 6 years ago.) I've tried to put together what appears to be a decent rig by myself with a little research, but I'm sure it can be improved.

Here's what I have so far:
CPU: $343 Intel Core i7 3770K

Mobo: $223 ASUS P8Z77-V PRO Motherboard

GPU: $539 Gigabyte GeForce GTX 680 2GB Super Overclock

RAM: $125 Corsair CMV16GX3M2A1333C9 16GB Kit (2x8GB) DDR3

SSD: $219 SanDisk Extreme Solid State Drive 240GB

HDD: $99 Seagate Barracuda 2TB ST2000DM001

Optical Drive: $79 LG BH14NS40 14X BD-R Blu-ray Writer OEM

Case: $89 CoolerMaster Centurion 6

PSU: $95 CoolerMaster GX 650W PSU
I have no idea if this is sufficient, but on the PSU specifications for the GPU it says a minimum 650W. I think I might need a bigger unit to handle this along with everything else?

Mouse: $79 Razer Taipan Gaming Mouse

Keyboard: Not sure about this one. I'd like something mechanical that's suitable for gaming, but I'd rather not shell out >$100.

Subtotal: $1,890
Shipping: $148
Total: $2,035

I'm really not sure if any of this gear is the right choice, except maybe the mouse, I'm inexplicably set on the mouse, lol. There seems to be alot of people here who know a great deal more than I do, so if anyone could help out and provide some advice that'd be great. Thanks. :)
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  1. Quote:

    PSU: $95 CoolerMaster GX 650W PSU
    I have no idea if this is sufficient, but on the PSU specifications for the GPU it says a minimum 650W. I think I might need a bigger unit to handle this along with everything else?


    Cooler Master is not a recommended brand of power supplies.

    Quote:
    Keyboard: Not sure about this one. I'd like something mechanical that's suitable for gaming, but I'd rather not shell out >$100.


    Yeah the thing about keyboards and mice is that there's cheap ones you can get. You can always add good ones later on. I'm thinking of investing in a mechanical backlit keyboard but I probably won't for quite a while.

    Here's what I would suggest on your budget:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($239.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($89.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UP4 TH ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($229.00 @ Scorptec)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($72.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($199.00 @ Scorptec)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($419.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($129.00 @ Scorptec)
    Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($149.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NS95 DVD/CD Writer ($25.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    Total: $1619.00
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-04-11 04:02 EST+1000)
  2. Thanks, most of the stuff you recommended looks great, however since I have the money wouldn't it be worth getting the i7 3770K and the GTX 680? Or is there some reason this wouldn't be worth it? Thanks for your time.
  3. Inquistition said:
    Thanks, most of the stuff you recommended looks great, however since I have the money wouldn't it be worth getting the i7 3770K and the GTX 680? Or is there some reason this wouldn't be worth it? Thanks for your time.


    3570K and 3770K are near identical in terms of performance, as are the GTX 670 and 680, and you save $200.
  4. Ok. And why 8GB RAM over 16GB?
  5. Best answer
    1. About i5 3570k or i7 3770k. Most of the games will perform about the same on 3570k and on 3770k. Crysis 3 is the only one which can gain advantage on 3770k, in the future I expect more games like that. My opinion is that if you can afford 3770k, go get it. 3770k will have better longer lifespan.

    2. The most effective RAM size for home usage is currently 8GB but if you can afford it, it does not hurt to buy 16GB. Looking from the price it is best to buy 1600 instead of 1333.

    3. I do not recommend PSUs from Coolermaster, get PSUs from Seasonic, Antec or Corsair.

    4. I would recommend SSDs more towards Intel, Crucial and Samsung rather than Sandisk or OCZ.

    The main point here is regarding RAM and proc, if you would like to bring down the budget go for i5 3570k and 8GB RAM. i5 3570k + 8GB RAM combination is the most effective today for gaming solution.
  6. Ok, thanks allot to both of you for your recommendations. I think I have a pretty good idea of what I want. Now I just can't wait to get my hands on the gear and put it all together...
  7. Quote:
    4. I would recommend SSDs more towards Intel, Crucial and Samsung rather than Sandisk or OCZ.


    I do not recommend Intel SSDs (one reason why I don't trust store reviews). I had one and had nothing but problems with it. My OCZ Vertex 4 has been completely problem free since I got it.
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