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Best motherboard Brand -

Tags:
  • Asus
  • Motherboards
  • Gigabyte
  • ASrock
  • MSI-Microstar
Last response: in Motherboards
April 11, 2013 1:45:20 AM

Hi! I want to know which one of these Motherboard Brands would be the best and the most reliable for 5-6 years.i will be paring it with i3 3220 and GTX 650 ti. the brands are-
AsRock
ASUS
Gigabyte
MSi
Please Answer.
Thank You :) 

More about : motherboard brand

a c 87 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b δ ASRock
April 11, 2013 1:53:44 AM

Asus imo.
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Best solution

a b V Motherboard
April 11, 2013 2:46:11 AM

ASUS makes the best high-end MOBOs on the market. Though they come at a price.

As you don't need a MOBO that supports overclocking or SLI, then it doesn't really matter what brand you choose. A cheap B75 would be suitable enough for you. However you would want PCI-E 3.0 for the best GPU performance and anti-surge protection, so your MOBO don't get fried.

My personal choices would either be with ASUS or MSI, as their BIOS are more attractive, fluent and easy to configure. Usually they also use the best components and therefore have the best built quality.
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April 18, 2013 12:14:50 PM

ssamramg said:
Hi! I want to know which one of these Motherboard Brands would be the best and the most reliable for 5-6 years.i will be paring it with i3 3220 and GTX 650 ti. the brands are-
AsRock
ASUS
Gigabyte
MSi
Please Answer.
Thank You :) 


Personally I like Gigabyte. Opinions will vary like they do with everything else, AMD vs Intel, Ford vs Chevy,..

Find a board with the features you want, usb headers, slot count and type etc,.. and run with it. Unless you need to change CPU's frequently, which I don't get, most boards if bought with the features and connections you need, will last just fine for several years barring any mechanical or electrical failure.

Personally I find Gigabytes UD series boards suit me fine. They have the headers I want, slots I want, and plenty of USB and other connections to choose from for all my devices. Most UD series boards can also be SLI'd or X-Fired with the right chipset choice in advance.
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April 18, 2013 2:48:34 PM

Actually, the brand that has the best reputation for stability and reliability is Intel's own line. Gamers tend not to like them for their "Spartan" looks and general resistance to overclocking, but Intel has a bigger incentive for stability than the rest.
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a c 87 V Motherboard
a b Ĉ ASUS
a b δ ASRock
April 18, 2013 2:52:42 PM

LMAO!Intel sure they do.
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a c 3785 V Motherboard
a c 1001 Ĉ ASUS
a c 319 δ ASRock
April 18, 2013 6:08:09 PM

http://gizmodo.com/5978232/intel-to-stop-making-desktop... < Intel is committed to what?

It's the end of an era: Intel has announced that, over the next three years, it will wind down production of desktop motherboards to zero.

The company will continue to supply chipsets for use by third party motherboard manufacturers—the likes of ASUS, ASRock and Gigabyte—but after 2013 it won't make more motherboards itself, reports Anandtech. In fact, the last output from Intel will be 'boards that accommodate its soon-to-launch Haswell architecture chips (the successor to Ivy Bridge). It'll then wind down and not bother for its subsequent set of silicon.

Instead, it will focus its efforts on creating form factor reference designs: mock-ups that are used internally for testing, but which often also end up as the base for third-party products. There won't be any trimming here—so you can probably expect to hear of plenty of new ultrabook, tablet and desktop prototypes in the future. Comfortingly, none of this will see job cuts at Intel. Instead, engineers will be absorbed into other divisions.

Gizmodo.com
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April 18, 2013 6:50:43 PM

Please, you are both being silly. Intel decision to leave the motherboard industry (which hasn't gone into effect yet, its going to take place over the next 3 years) has NOTHING to do with the quality of their boards. It was a business decision. Intel makes money selling CPUs, selling motherboards was a way to make sure those CPUs had a home. In the last decade or so, a ton of companies have started releasing their own motherboards (based ENTIRELY on Intel's designs, and will continue to be based entirely on Intel's designs). This means two things: 1) competition keeps prices low and there is only a little bit of money to be made for each motherboard sold. 2) The quality coming from this competition has risen so Intel knows their CPUs will have a home.

The best equivalent I can think of is if Nintendo announced that it would no longer publish its own internally developed games. It isn't perfect, since Nintendo makes quite a bit of money off its own games even today and the quality runs the gammut from great to gimmicky. However, the original motivation of insuring quality and content for a console is pretty much gone. There are way to many 3rd party software developers producing quality games, so Nintendo could just sit back and sell hardware at a profit. This is pretty much what Intel is doing.

Anyways, I have never heard ANYONE complain about buying an Intel motherboard. Usually, the attitude is "They just work, dammit."
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