Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Very loud cpu fan after motherboard upgrade (ASRock N68-Vs3 FX)

Tags:
  • Cooling
  • Fan
  • ASrock
  • Motherboards
  • Socket
  • CPUs
Last response: in CPUs
Share
April 11, 2013 6:38:39 AM

Hi,

About two weeks ago, I upgraded my socket 939 motherboard to the ASRock N68-Vs3 FX and I'm having some issues with the fan which throttles up well over 6000 RPM.

Initially, I used the stock HS/Fan that I used on my socket 939 board. It worked fine on the previous board, but on the new board it would throttle up to over 6,000 RPM as soon as I pushed the power button which was normal but it usually throttled down as soon as the bios would post; not so with the new motherboard.

When I powered on my computer, the fan would continuously roar at +6000 RPM to no end. It was quite unbearable. I noticed that there is an option in the motherboard for fan control but there was a caption that read that only fans with 4 pins could be optimized via the settings.

I didn't have have a 4pin fan at the time, so I tried another one that was also 3pin and at least it didn't throttle at full blast 100% of the time, but It would gradually throttle up over time until it eventually almost as loud as my previous HS/Fan.

I checked the cpu temp in the bios and I was shocked to see that the temp was at 75° C! I figured the problem might lie with the fact that I didn't use new thermal paste or because I wasn't using the recommended 4pined HS/fan, so I purchased a cheap new stock 4pin AMD HS/fan on ebay along with generic thermal paste.

I received the HS/Fan and it turns out the thermal compound was pre-applied to the base of the heatsink, so I didn't bother using the thermal compound that I bought. When I installed the HS/Fan I went into the bios and enabled fan control which targets 50°C and checked the HW monitor section and to my dismay the cpu fan behaves much like the last albeit the cpu temperature doesn't get quite as high as before. Last I checked the temperature stood steady at about 63° C.

It's also worth noting that AMD cool n' quiet is enabled and I'm currently using the Balanced power settings in Windows 7 yet even still the fan is roaring away at 6,000+ RPM.

Any help would be appreciated.

More about : loud cpu fan motherboard upgrade asrock n68 vs3

April 11, 2013 6:53:18 AM

When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:02:39 AM

AZCompTech said:
When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?


Yep. I made sure to wipe all the old paste off before I put in the new heatsink.
m
0
l
Related resources
April 11, 2013 7:06:59 AM

penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?


Yep. I made sure to wipe all the old paste off before I put in the new heatsink.


If you have better thermal paste that you bought, remove the heat sink, clean everything, and put a pea sized amount on the CPU. Then reapply the heat sink.

Also, are you running at stock speeds? No overclocking?
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:11:44 AM

AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?


Yep. I made sure to wipe all the old paste off before I put in the new heatsink.


If you have better thermal paste that you bought, remove the heat sink, clean everything, and put a pea sized amount on the CPU. Then reapply the heat sink.

Also, are you running at stock speeds? No overclocking?


I have some new thermal paste, but I highly doubt it's any better than the pre-applied stuff. It's cheap gold thermal paste I bought off ebay. The reason I didn't get anything better was because I knew I wasn't planning on overclocking and I figured the cheap paste would do well enough.

My CPU is running at stock. Nothing on my board is overclocked.
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:14:41 AM

penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?


Yep. I made sure to wipe all the old paste off before I put in the new heatsink.


If you have better thermal paste that you bought, remove the heat sink, clean everything, and put a pea sized amount on the CPU. Then reapply the heat sink.

Also, are you running at stock speeds? No overclocking?


I have some new thermal paste, but I highly doubt it's any better than the pre-applied stuff. It's cheap gold thermal paste I bought off ebay. The reason I didn't get anything better was because I knew I wasn't planning on overclocking and I figured the cheap paste would do well enough.

My CPU is running at stock. Nothing on my board is overclocked.



Well, the problem definitely lies with the heatsink. Something isn't making a good connection. Have you removed the heat sink since the new one with thermal paste was put on?

Open up the case and gently try and move the heat sink. Does it feel solid and firmly attached?
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:22:05 AM

AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?


Yep. I made sure to wipe all the old paste off before I put in the new heatsink.


If you have better thermal paste that you bought, remove the heat sink, clean everything, and put a pea sized amount on the CPU. Then reapply the heat sink.

Also, are you running at stock speeds? No overclocking?


I have some new thermal paste, but I highly doubt it's any better than the pre-applied stuff. It's cheap gold thermal paste I bought off ebay. The reason I didn't get anything better was because I knew I wasn't planning on overclocking and I figured the cheap paste would do well enough.

My CPU is running at stock. Nothing on my board is overclocked.



Well, the problem definitely lies with the heatsink. Something isn't making a good connection. Have you removed the heat sink since the new one with thermal paste was put on?

Open up the case and gently try and move the heat sink. Does it feel solid and firmly attached?


I haven't moved the heatsink yet, and I already tried taking a look inside the case to make sure the heatsink wasn't loose and appeared to be firmly attached. It doesn't wobble at all when I try to shaking it. Normally when the fan is loose my case begins to vibrate violently but it isn't doing that now. The only sound coming from it is the fan.
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:23:35 AM

penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?


Yep. I made sure to wipe all the old paste off before I put in the new heatsink.


If you have better thermal paste that you bought, remove the heat sink, clean everything, and put a pea sized amount on the CPU. Then reapply the heat sink.

Also, are you running at stock speeds? No overclocking?


I have some new thermal paste, but I highly doubt it's any better than the pre-applied stuff. It's cheap gold thermal paste I bought off ebay. The reason I didn't get anything better was because I knew I wasn't planning on overclocking and I figured the cheap paste would do well enough.

My CPU is running at stock. Nothing on my board is overclocked.



Well, the problem definitely lies with the heatsink. Something isn't making a good connection. Have you removed the heat sink since the new one with thermal paste was put on?

Open up the case and gently try and move the heat sink. Does it feel solid and firmly attached?


I haven't moved the heatsink yet, and I already tried taking a look inside the case to make sure the heatsink wasn't loose and appeared to be firmly attached. It doesn't wobble at all when I try to shaking it. Normally when the fan is loose my case begins to vibrate violently but it isn't doing that now. The only sound coming from it is the fan.


What heat sink do you have on it now? Do you have a budget to get a new one if need be?
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:39:37 AM

AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
When you put the new heatsink on, did you clean off the old thermal paste from the CPU?


Yep. I made sure to wipe all the old paste off before I put in the new heatsink.


If you have better thermal paste that you bought, remove the heat sink, clean everything, and put a pea sized amount on the CPU. Then reapply the heat sink.

Also, are you running at stock speeds? No overclocking?


I have some new thermal paste, but I highly doubt it's any better than the pre-applied stuff. It's cheap gold thermal paste I bought off ebay. The reason I didn't get anything better was because I knew I wasn't planning on overclocking and I figured the cheap paste would do well enough.

My CPU is running at stock. Nothing on my board is overclocked.



Well, the problem definitely lies with the heatsink. Something isn't making a good connection. Have you removed the heat sink since the new one with thermal paste was put on?

Open up the case and gently try and move the heat sink. Does it feel solid and firmly attached?


I haven't moved the heatsink yet, and I already tried taking a look inside the case to make sure the heatsink wasn't loose and appeared to be firmly attached. It doesn't wobble at all when I try to shaking it. Normally when the fan is loose my case begins to vibrate violently but it isn't doing that now. The only sound coming from it is the fan.


What heat sink do you have on it now? Do you have a budget to get a new one if need be?


I'm using this. I guess if pushed I would get a new one, but I'd much prefer to find some way to get the one I have working properly.

Do you think there could be a problem with the mobo?
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:42:51 AM

You could try replacing the thermal compound, but that cooler is junk.

If you can afford 30 bucks, get something like a Hyper V 212
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 7:57:29 AM

AZCompTech said:
You could try replacing the thermal compound, but that cooler is junk.

If you can afford 30 bucks, get something like a Hyper V 212


You sure? I thought just about anything would do for a cpu that's running at stock speed. And is there anything that you could recommend that wouldn't require me to remove the bracket. I just want to keep it simple.
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 8:00:55 AM

penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
You could try replacing the thermal compound, but that cooler is junk.

If you can afford 30 bucks, get something like a Hyper V 212


You sure? I thought just about anything would do for a cpu that's running at stock speed. And is there anything that you could recommend that wouldn't require me to remove the bracket. I just want to keep it simple.



You need to remove the bracket to put anything decent in. Those stock mounting brackets just dont give you the kind of rigidness you need for a decent heatsink. They aren't as hard to install as you might think. Pretty straight forward as long as you follow the directions.

But, there really isn't anything it could be. There COULD be a very very off chance that the MOBO is defective and is sending too much voltage through the CPU.

You can try and remedy this by clearing the CMOS. Unplug the computer then find the circular battery on the motherboard. Remove the battery then hold down the power button for 60 seconds. After that, wait a few minutes then put the battery back in. Then plug the computer back into the wall and turn it on.

m
0
l
April 11, 2013 8:30:28 AM

AZCompTech said:


You need to remove the bracket to put anything decent in. Those stock mounting brackets just dont give you the kind of rigidness you need for a decent heatsink. They aren't as hard to install as you might think. Pretty straight forward as long as you follow the directions.

But, there really isn't anything it could be. There COULD be a very very off chance that the MOBO is defective and is sending too much voltage through the CPU.

You can try and remedy this by clearing the CMOS. Unplug the computer then find the circular battery on the motherboard. Remove the battery then hold down the power button for 60 seconds. After that, wait a few minutes then put the battery back in. Then plug the computer back into the wall and turn it on.



I'll give that a try right now, but if it doesn't work I'll look into getting the Hyper V 212 although admittedly that heatsink does look rather convoluted to deal with...



For something that should be as simple as a heatsink, there sure seems to be a lot of parts to assemble.
m
0
l
a c 127 V Motherboard
a c 901 à CPUs
April 11, 2013 9:11:21 AM

penn919 said:
AZCompTech said:
You could try replacing the thermal compound, but that cooler is junk.

If you can afford 30 bucks, get something like a Hyper V 212


You sure? I thought just about anything would do for a cpu that's running at stock speed. And is there anything that you could recommend that wouldn't require me to remove the bracket. I just want to keep it simple.


Not just anything will do. The fan has to be capable of handling the thermals of the CPU it is on. Even some stock coolers are better than others.

You can go with a TX3 as well. Much better than stock and it will mount the same as your stock heatsink.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l
April 11, 2013 10:30:22 AM

logainofhades said:


Not just anything will do. The fan has to be capable of handling the thermals of the CPU it is on. Even some stock coolers are better than others.

You can go with a TX3 as well. Much better than stock and it will mount the same as your stock heatsink.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


I don't see any hooks on the sides. It doesn't look like it'll mount the same way.
m
0
l

Best solution

a c 127 V Motherboard
a c 901 à CPUs
April 11, 2013 11:28:30 AM

It mounts the same way. I have used one. Since it is a universal cooler, you have to use the necessary hardware to make it work.

http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/product.php?category_id...
http://www.coolermaster-usa.com/upload/download/162/fil...
Share
!