Which memory should I buy? PC2700 or PC3200?

Hi peeps,

I will be installing 2x 1GB DDR SDRAM on my PC to boost its performance. These memory modules are quite expensive because they are relatively old and rare.

However, I have been offered two 1GB PC2700 memories, i.e DDR 333Mhz, for an excellent price: Kingston KVR333X64C25/1G

I have also been offered two 1GB PC3200 memories, i.e DDR 400Mhz, for a much higher price than the Kingston memories: Corsair CMR1G400

There is a price difference of $40 between the two 1GB PC3200 and the two 1GB PC2700.

If there is a big difference in speed between the two 1GB PC2700 and the two 1GB PC3200, maybe I should go for the two 1GB PC3200 memories even though they are $40 more expensive.

However, if the difference in speed between the two 1GB PC2700 and the two 1GB PC3200 is negligible, then maybe I should go for the two 1GB PC2700 memories instead.

From your experience, what do you people think I should do?

1) Should I buy the two Kingston PC2700 memories?

2) or should I buy the two Corsair PC3200 memories?

Thanks for reading ;-)

Regards
10 answers Last reply
More about memory buy pc2700 pc3200
  1. In terms of the difference you'll see on the PC, probably not much. Since this is obviously an older computer I wouldn't bother putting $40 more into it than needed.
  2. If the ram is to be added to your current pc, then realize that all the ram must operate at the lowest common denominator of spec.
    And... different ram in the same pc may not work at all if our motherboard is sensitive to ram.

    If the ram is to be the only ram in your pc, go to the Kingston or Corsair web site and access their ram upgrade app.
    If a kit is on the supported list for your motherboard or pc model, then you are good.

    If both are supported, I would not worry too much about the ram speeds. You are looking probably at a 2-4% cpu power hit which will be more than compensated for by the addition of more ram.
  3. SchizTech & geofelt: Thanks for replying

    @geofelt: I do not really understand: "all the ram must operate at the lowest common denominator of spec"
  4. attal said:
    SchizTech & geofelt: Thanks for replying

    @geofelt: I do not really understand: "all the ram must operate at the lowest common denominator of spec"


    It means if you mix memory with different speeds, the motherboard will run all the RAM at the lowest speed. All of the RAM in the system must run at the same speed (the board can't run different RAM chips at different speeds) and it won't run slower RAM at higher speeds due to the risk of instability.
  5. Exactly^
  6. ok...I see...

    Another thing I do not understand: Why would there be "a 2-4% cpu power hit"
  7. When a cpu can not fetch the data it needs to use from ram quickly, it must wait.
    In actual usage, the effect on fps or application processing speed is in the 2-4% range.
    The effect on synthetic benchmarks are much larger, but irrelevant.
  8. attal said:
    ok...I see...

    Another thing I do not understand: Why would there be "a 2-4% cpu power hit"


    Basically he means this is about how much "slow" RAM will affect overall performance: not by a whole lot. The difference in memory speed makes a relatively small difference in overall performance.
  9. "you've been offered".......... what motherboard do you have?

    but yes, the other's are pretty much on que.
  10. @ swifty_morgan: I have a dell dimension 1100. I do not know what motherboard it is.
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