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Q6600 at 107 C with stock cooler, it is set up properly

Hi everyone,

My processor is overheating for no good reason. I use a stock cooler, and I already broke one stock cooler so i learned how to fix in into place and its not loose or anything like that.

Also, when I turn on my PC it turns on and then back off for a second then on again. I have a 500 W GPU and 4800 ati radeon graphics card. ...

http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/8069/36254637.jpg

The low temperatures are temperatures when I turn on my computer and the high temperature is from a test I ran from inside Real Temp. I cut the test short because i was afraid for my CPU.
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about q6600 107 stock cooler set properly
  1. Did you put the thermal paste on it?
  2. Of course, I used arctic silver
  3. If you used the stock cooler check to make sure it is seated well by reaching in and giving each of the twist clips a pull straight up. If you can pull any of them up then they were not seated well and this would be the reason for your heating issues.

    The best advise I can give anyone with the stock HSF (heatsink/fan) is if you can get some one to help you seat the HSF it helps and also it helps if you can mount it before you mount the board in the case, so that you can check the backside of the board to make sure they HSF is seated well and locked in place.
  4. pull it off and reapply paste. is the fane turning? can you see it?
  5. IntelEnthusiast said:
    If you used the stock cooler check to make sure it is seated well by reaching in and giving each of the twist clips a pull straight up. If you can pull any of them up then they were not seated well and this would be the reason for your heating issues.

    Tried to do this, no way. It won't budge at ALL.

    The fan is turning, I applied the paste multiple times in the past, its all done well. I need to look for alternative causes to the problem. Is there a chance something else is causing the heat?

    When I try to move my heatsink up i
  6. I don't understand that it won't budge...you mean you can't pull the heatsink off? why not?
  7. zivlaks said:
    IntelEnthusiast said:
    If you used the stock cooler check to make sure it is seated well by reaching in and giving each of the twist clips a pull straight up. If you can pull any of them up then they were not seated well and this would be the reason for your heating issues.

    Tried to do this, no way. It won't budge at ALL.

    The fan is turning, I applied the paste multiple times in the past, its all done well. I need to look for alternative causes to the problem. Is there a chance something else is causing the heat?

    When I try to move my heatsink up i


    Have you cleaned the CPU surface after reapplying the Artic SIlver?
  8. Best answer
    zivlaks,

    As others have concentrated on the positioning and thermal bridge between CPU and cooler, I can only suggest that you get a sense of how well the air is circulating inside the case in the area of the CPU cooling fan. Does you CPU monitor indicate the various case and CPU fans RPM? The speed of one or more fans may be at fault. In my Dell Precision T5400, the case fans run about 1100RPM and the special memory fan runs about 1400 rpm.

    By the way, if you're using a Q6600, you're system RAM is probably DDR2- as is mine and DDR2 is hot, hot , hot. I panicked when I saw RAM temperatures of 93C then saw many posts of RAM at 95-90C. If you're using DDR2, you might look into all possible contributing factors of the RAM temperatures and in combination with the fan performance and circulation in case hot RAM, a hot graphics card, PSU, and possibly blockage of the air inlets is causing high CPU temperatures. I was unable to change the fan speeds, but attended to the case air circulation factors and my RAM is now running at 70C and below and CPU temperatures ( I use 2X Xeon X5460) went from 65 to about 57 C. I am considering for the future adding a 92mm auxiliary case fan (visit Newegg for these) at the back to extract the air pushed in by the front fans, stirred up by the special memory fans and you might consider this method to try and cool everything down to reasonable levels.

    Also, a lot of people using Q6600's are putting them where Core 2 Duos went before (such as Dell Precision 390's and T3400's- and the quad core Q6600 puts out about twice as much heat as a two core. Like the change to the Q6600 in the systems listed, many change the 375W for the 525W power supply and run not only the higher wattage CPU but higher wattage graphics cards, adding 150 or more watts to the case interior heat. I saw a system that had been a Core 2 Duo 6300 (1.86GHz) changed for a Q6700 (2.66GHz) -that's going from 50 to 130W and from a 45W Quadro 550 to a GTX 285- 205W as well as changing the 375W to a 525W PSU - that's +380W heat, but with no changes to the cooling components. Also modern graphics cards and extra drives can block air flow. Just a thought,..

    Cheers,

    BambiBoom
  9. Reapplied the thermal paste, and checked the cooler again. Hottest core was at 46 C when I turned on my PC.

    Damn these plastic pin coolers suck.
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