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Sata3 HDD is not giving enough read speed.

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April 17, 2013 10:35:54 AM

I'm using WD wd20earx which is a green drive with 2TB storage. This is a sata 3 HDD, and my motherboard is also capable of sata3. My motherboard is intel DB75EN. But I'm getting 30-40MB copy speed within same HDD (in different partitions). Is this is ok?? Or I should get more speed?
a b G Storage
April 17, 2013 10:44:37 AM

copying from the same HD is going to really slow things down. It has to access the data, copy it memory, move the heads to a different spot and possibly different platter, put the head down, write the data, and repeat for every like 4k block.

Run a benchmark hard drive software instead that will create data in RAM and copy it to HD if you want to see if everything is working well.

It's also a green drive, not the fastest of the bunch.
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April 17, 2013 10:51:13 AM

getochkn said:
copying from the same HD is going to really slow things down. It has to access the data, copy it memory, move the heads to a different spot and possibly different platter, put the head down, write the data, and repeat for every like 4k block.

Run a benchmark hard drive software instead that will create data in RAM and copy it to HD if you want to see if everything is working well.

It's also a green drive, not the fastest of the bunch.

I have used HD tune. In this also read speed is min 50MB and max 120MB
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a b G Storage
April 17, 2013 10:52:09 AM

Well, 30 - 40 MB sounds pretty decent, if you consider that the armature has to seek to the data, read it, buffer it, seek to the new location and finally write it, over and over again, depending on the limits of the buffering being done. I also believe the green WD drives are meant to be lower power rather than higher speed, so I wouldn't expect as high of a transfer rate to begin with.

SATA 3 is the interface between your drive and your host bus and really only determines the upper limit for data transfers between the drive's onboard memory and controller and the rest of the system. It really has no bearing on how fast the internal mechanics of a hard drive are going to be. There is also no way a single, mechanical, consumer grade hard disc is going to saturate a SATA 3 connection at the current technology level.

:-)
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April 17, 2013 10:58:10 AM

bigpinkdragon286 said:
Well, 30 - 40 MB sounds pretty decent, if you consider that the armature has to seek to the data, read it, buffer it, seek to the new location and finally write it, over and over again, depending on the limits of the buffering being done. I also believe the green WD drives are meant to be lower power rather than higher speed, so I wouldn't expect as high of a transfer rate to begin with.

SATA 3 is the interface between your drive and your host bus and really only determines the upper limit for data transfers between the drive's onboard memory and controller and the rest of the system. It really has no bearing on how fast the internal mechanics of a hard drive are going to be. There is also no way a single, mechanical, consumer grade hard disc is going to saturate a SATA 3 connection at the current technology level.

:-)

So I have nothing worry about my HDD read write speed ????
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April 17, 2013 11:06:37 AM

jayadratha said:
So I have nothing worry about my HDD read write speed ????


No, it is working normally.


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a c 353 G Storage
April 17, 2013 11:10:25 AM

1) Sata III HDDs is a marketing tool, The ONLY benifit of placing a sata III on a SATA III port, vs puting it on sata II port, is the short burst speed, sustained through put in no different. Myself, they are a waste of a "good" sata III port which a SSD can take advantage of.
2) green drives are typically "low" end performance wise drives.
3) Your throughput is close to what can be expected.
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a b G Storage
April 17, 2013 11:24:23 AM

Nope, you have nothing to worry about from with your HDD read/ write speed. It seems low because it's doing both reading and writing, not just one or the other, and giving you the total throughput when handling both operations at the same time, plus, with the sort of usage you are doing, you have the arbitration time, however small, for the handling of the data which is being shuffled between the read and the write operations.

If you do a dedicated read or write operation, and not a copy to the same disc, you should see much higher numbers.

I agree with RetiredChief about SATA 3's benefit. It's only really useful for transfers between the host and the disk controller, however the sooner one device can free the bus or the controller, the sooner another device can use it, which can help with responsiveness.
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