Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Is a dual radiator really neccesarry for a cpu liquid cooling solution.

Last response: in CPUs
Share
April 17, 2013 7:39:09 PM

I recently bought a corsair h50 liquid cpu cooler, and noticed that my temperatures rarely reach above 46C (with 2500k oc'd to 3.9Ghz) that's down from the 70C that it would hover around with the stock cooler and voltage. The h50 is a single fan single radiator component, are the benefits that big with a dual radiator system?
a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 7:46:06 PM

Well, keep in mind that the 'Fisher-Price' all-in-ones aren't going to perform NEARLY as well as real watercooling, and that the H50 is on the low end of even the prefabs.

With something like the H100i, you have twice the surface area dissipating heat. Of course it's going to be better. That being said, your temperatures are fine, especially with such a modest overclock as you have.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 7:47:56 PM

As the overclock gets higher the heat generated becomes more and more , till it gets to the point where even a tiny bit more overclock is a lot more heat, at this point you need more cooling power to make even little gains
Related resources
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 7:50:02 PM

What DarkSable said is correct, but there is no need to buy anything better, you're temperatures sound fine if that is 46 while gaming.
April 17, 2013 7:50:19 PM

DarkSable said:
Well, keep in mind that the 'Fisher-Price' all-in-ones aren't going to perform NEARLY as well as real watercooling, and that the H50 is on the low end of even the prefabs.

With something like the H100i, you have twice the surface area dissipating heat. Of course it's going to be better. That being said, your temperatures are fine, especially with such a modest overclock as you have.

I mostly just tinker around with overclocking my cpu and really only got the h50 because it was low profile and my ram is high profile, That being said what kind of temperatures could I expect if I (eventually) upgraded to an H100i, and how far would it let me push my cpu.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 7:54:13 PM

I have the H100, and I idle 21-24C depending on ambient, and never exceed mid 40's running prime95 or Intel burnt test for hours.

I am overclocked to 4.2ghz only, and under volting, but before under volt it's about 10-15c higher than what I have now.

So expect similar for your processor, but a bit better with the H100i.

a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 7:57:41 PM

edogawa said:
I have the H100, and I idle 21-24C depending on ambient, and never exceed mid 40's running prime95 or Intel burnt test for hours.

I am overclocked to 4.2ghz only, and under volting, but before under volt it's about 10-15c higher than what I have now.

So expect similar for your processor, but a bit better with the H100i.


Dude, you must have a freezing room.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:00:01 PM

ihog said:
edogawa said:
I have the H100, and I idle 21-24C depending on ambient, and never exceed mid 40's running prime95 or Intel burnt test for hours.

I am overclocked to 4.2ghz only, and under volting, but before under volt it's about 10-15c higher than what I have now.

So expect similar for your processor, but a bit better with the H100i.


Dude, you must have a freezing room.


Haha! I wish, southern California is warm. It's like around 70F right now.
April 17, 2013 8:12:43 PM

Could i just get a new double fan radiator and a pump and keep the cooler, or should I go with a new cooler when I decide to upgrade?
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:15:19 PM

phillipskid32 said:
Could i just get a new double fan radiator and a pump and keep the cooler, or should I go with a new cooler when I decide to upgrade?



Why would you want to upgrade? You're temperatures are fine sounding. Get a new CPU cooler when you upgrade your system again.
a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:26:17 PM

phillipskid32 said:
Could i just get a new double fan radiator and a pump and keep the cooler, or should I go with a new cooler when I decide to upgrade?


Why do either? Your temperatures are just fine right now - if you upgrade in the future, the chip you upgrade to will be MORE energy-efficient, and thus will give off less heat.

Why do you want to upgrade? It kinda sounds like you've got money burning a hole in your pocket and want an excuse to spend it. I know that feeling real well, especially when it comes to computers, and I can tell you that in this case it's a bad idea, as you won't be able to sell a used, prebuilt, low-end watercooler.
April 17, 2013 8:27:14 PM

edogawa said:
phillipskid32 said:
Could i just get a new double fan radiator and a pump and keep the cooler, or should I go with a new cooler when I decide to upgrade?



Why would you want to upgrade? You're temperatures are fine sounding. Get a new CPU cooler when you upgrade your system again.

I want to get higher overclocks is the main reason. I also like new stuff.
;) 
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:30:33 PM

Well, let me put it this way, this will be your best route:


Overclock to 4.2-4.5ghz, if you're temperatures are below 60c on prime95 load then you're good to go.

Buy an H100i or H80i if you want to burn money for 4.5ghz which won't benefit you that much.

You should save the cash for a new GPU in future as it will be A LOT more beneficial for gaming then a couple hundred mhz.
a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:35:03 PM

You can easily go up to 4.5GHz with that chip and that cooler - as long as you're below 65 on 100% load, then you're JUST fine.

Like edo said, there's no point upgrading your cooler when yours is sufficient, when you get infinitely more benefit from upgrades elsewhere.

If you DO upgrade your cooling, going to another 'Fisher-Price' cooler is about the worst thing you could possibly do. Save up and get a real water-cooling loop, and you'll actually get performance, along with reliability and the option to expand.
April 17, 2013 8:40:42 PM

edogawa said:
Well, let me put it this way, this will be your best route:


Overclock to 4.2-4.5ghz, if you're temperatures are below 60c on prime95 load then you're good to go.

Buy an H100i or H80i if you want to burn money for 4.5ghz which won't benefit you that much.

You should save the cash for a new GPU in future as it will be A LOT more beneficial for gaming then a couple hundred mhz.


I actually just burnt money on new gpu's, sli'd 660ti's(not super impressive, but they get the job done). I should also note that I do a lot of video rendering, editing, ect... and want to get the most out of my processor(I'll eventually upgrade it to an ivy bridge, but want a good system in place for when I do)
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:42:26 PM

DarkSable said:
You can easily go up to 4.5GHz with that chip and that cooler - as long as you're below 65 on 100% load, then you're JUST fine.

Like edo said, there's no point upgrading your cooler when yours is sufficient, when you get infinitely more benefit from upgrades elsewhere.

If you DO upgrade your cooling, going to another 'Fisher-Price' cooler is about the worst thing you could possibly do. Save up and get a real water-cooling loop, and you'll actually get performance, along with reliability and the option to expand.


I actually highly disagree with getting a real water-cooling loop unless you're doing an extreme system with very heavy overclocking and 3-4 graphics cards. 4.7-5.0.

Custom water cooling is becoming less relevant every year, hardware is getting more power efficient, and better. An all in will do 4.5ghz easily and stay cool. As cool as a custom loop is, it's unnecessary unless you're into for the look and fun of it.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:43:43 PM

Haswell will be out soon so you can upgrade to one of the new i7s, and get a better all in one.
April 17, 2013 8:44:51 PM

DarkSable said:
You can easily go up to 4.5GHz with that chip and that cooler - as long as you're below 65 on 100% load, then you're JUST fine.

Like edo said, there's no point upgrading your cooler when yours is sufficient, when you get infinitely more benefit from upgrades elsewhere.

If you DO upgrade your cooling, going to another 'Fisher-Price' cooler is about the worst thing you could possibly do. Save up and get a real water-cooling loop, and you'll actually get performance, along with reliability and the option to expand.

thanks, that's what I wanted to know. As far as upgrades go though, I've upgraded just about every aspect of my computer other then cooling(besides case fans), and I could in fact almost build a new system with leftover parts.
a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:45:28 PM

edogawa said:
Custom water cooling is becoming less relevant every year, hardware is getting more power efficient, and better. An all in will do 4.5ghz easily and stay cool. As cool as a custom loop is, it's unnecessary unless you're into for the look and fun of it.


I disagree, for two reasons. One, it's much, MUCH more reliable than a closed-loop cooler, and two, the ability to expand, even just to a graphics card, is worth it to me. The other benefit is noise - closed-loop coolers are just as noisy as air coolers with decent fans are, and done right, watercooling is virtually noiseless.

April 17, 2013 8:47:35 PM

edogawa said:
Haswell will be out soon so you can upgrade to one of the new i7s, and get a better all in one.


True, but are they compatible with 1155 sockets. I haven't read much about Haswell yet, so forgive the "noobish" question.
a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:48:37 PM

edogawa said:
Haswell will be out soon so you can upgrade to one of the new i7s, and get a better all in one.
How is that a better option? :p 

Presuming that the OP isn't doing number crunching, then getting an i7 over an i5 isn't really worth the money, and upgrading to a better all in one still leaves him with an all in one. If you took the money for an i7-4770k and an H100i, it would buy an i5-4570k and a XPSC watercooling kit and would get him better performance for the same price.

(And phillips, that's a sign you've been caught; I probably have a few computers' worth of spare parts around the place, including two and a half cases.)
a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:50:06 PM

phillipskid32 said:
edogawa said:
Haswell will be out soon so you can upgrade to one of the new i7s, and get a better all in one.


True, but are they compatible with 1155 sockets. I haven't read much about Haswell yet, so forgive the "noobish" question.


They will not be, no - they will be using the 1150 socket, and won't be back-compatible.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:53:33 PM

DarkSable said:
edogawa said:
Custom water cooling is becoming less relevant every year, hardware is getting more power efficient, and better. An all in will do 4.5ghz easily and stay cool. As cool as a custom loop is, it's unnecessary unless you're into for the look and fun of it.


I disagree, for two reasons. One, it's much, MUCH more reliable than a closed-loop cooler, and two, the ability to expand, even just to a graphics card, is worth it to me. The other benefit is noise - closed-loop coolers are just as noisy as air coolers with decent fans are, and done right, watercooling is virtually noiseless.



Reliability wise that's in the air, I've never had an issue with my H100, all in ones are becoming better and better too.

I agree on the noise factor, but it's not a huge deal. My PCS are almost completely silent except for the heat sinks, but I have those on maximum speed.

As I said though, it should be for extreme systems only, really no reason to do it unless your doing heavy overclocking and 3 or 4 graphics cards.

a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 8:56:02 PM

DarkSable said:
edogawa said:
Haswell will be out soon so you can upgrade to one of the new i7s, and get a better all in one.
How is that a better option? :p 

Presuming that the OP isn't doing number crunching, then getting an i7 over an i5 isn't really worth the money, and upgrading to a better all in one still leaves him with an all in one. If you took the money for an i7-4770k and an H100i, it would buy an i5-4570k and a XPSC watercooling kit and would get him better performance for the same price.

(And phillips, that's a sign you've been caught; I probably have a few computers' worth of spare parts around the place, including two and a half cases.)


But he is doing video editing/rendering he said, and overclocking may be better with the new haswell processors.
April 17, 2013 8:57:02 PM

DarkSable said:
edogawa said:
Haswell will be out soon so you can upgrade to one of the new i7s, and get a better all in one.
How is that a better option? :p 

Presuming that the OP isn't doing number crunching, then getting an i7 over an i5 isn't really worth the money, and upgrading to a better all in one still leaves him with an all in one. If you took the money for an i7-4770k and an H100i, it would buy an i5-4570k and a XPSC watercooling kit and would get him better performance for the same price.

(And phillips, that's a sign you've been caught; I probably have a few computers' worth of spare parts around the place, including two and a half cases.)
And a half. how does that happen?

a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 9:10:15 PM

Ahh, I missed that he was working with videos - in that case the i7 might be a decent idea, if he's doing a lot of it. (As for overclocking, they're just isolating the multiplier from the BLCK - you don't actually overclock any better or easier; it's marketing hype. However, it'll be more power-efficient than ivy bridge, so the cooling probably won't be needed.)

As for reliability, it's arguable - I see people with issues with all-in-ones all the time. I'm not sure why you say it should only be done in extreme cases, but that's fine ; we've both made our points, and the OP can read them and decide where he or she stands.

(As for the half-case, it was an older one which I stole the sides and front of to mod with.)
April 17, 2013 9:20:14 PM

Thanks for the help guys. For the time being I'm going to stick with what I've got. But I'll be upgrading in the future. Possibly to just an ivy bridge i7(maybe the 3930k will be cheaper when haswell launches.)
a c 86 à CPUs
April 17, 2013 9:37:39 PM

A Haswell i7 is probably going to be your best bet for the money - the upgrade to ivy bridge won't be huge, and the 3930k is going to remain expensive and on a specialized platform. Just my two cents.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 9:42:57 PM

Sounds like a plan Philip. :D 
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 10:14:27 PM

edogawa said:
DarkSable said:
You can easily go up to 4.5GHz with that chip and that cooler - as long as you're below 65 on 100% load, then you're JUST fine.

Like edo said, there's no point upgrading your cooler when yours is sufficient, when you get infinitely more benefit from upgrades elsewhere.

If you DO upgrade your cooling, going to another 'Fisher-Price' cooler is about the worst thing you could possibly do. Save up and get a real water-cooling loop, and you'll actually get performance, along with reliability and the option to expand.


I actually highly disagree with getting a real water-cooling loop unless you're doing an extreme system with very heavy overclocking and 3-4 graphics cards. 4.7-5.0.

Custom water cooling is becoming less relevant every year, hardware is getting more power efficient, and better. An all in will do 4.5ghz easily and stay cool. As cool as a custom loop is, it's unnecessary unless you're into for the look and fun of it.


Agree with just the CPU being cooled the H100i in my i5 system cools just as good as my custom loop in my other rig. With both my idles are around 27c and the price was alot less with the H100i.
a b à CPUs
April 17, 2013 10:21:02 PM

@bryonhowley

Interesting. What about load temperatures?


a c 113 à CPUs
April 18, 2013 12:58:18 AM

Idle temps are dictated by ambient temperature more than anything, load temps is where the difference is.

Also whats in the loop might be useful to say if you compare CLC's against a custom. If your running a slim 120mm rad against a H100i, I would expect the H100i to eke out similar if not better performance.
!