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I just experienced the worst scare yet with my build trying to OC my ram. Win8, Corsair Vengeance 2x4GB 1600 (Custom Timings)

So I was following a post on Tom's about different timings for my Corsair Vengeance C9 1600 DDR3s. I proceeded to boot into BIOS and set all settings to default, then I adjusted my ram speed to 1600 from the default (Auto), my timings to 7-9-7-10 as suggested by the tom's post i referenced, and adjusted my DRAM voltage from 1.5v to 1.6, again, as the post suggested. Now I totally understand that every board is different and different hardware match-ups yield MUCH different results, I'm new to OCing but not in the least bit new to computer building/ tweaking and such.

Next, the scare. I boot my computer after each increment and run MaxxMem to confirm performance boost/loss. My rig POSTs and runs through the usual splash screen, no sign of safe mode or the like....then the monitor turns off and back on, signifying that its loading the GPU drivers...goood, good...and then...NOTHING. The HD is being read, my hard drive disk access light is going wild on my case, so things are happening. But, nothing onscreen.

I calmly unplug my case and sit it on top of my desk, pop off the side and ground myself as i pop the ram out and reseat the DIMMs. I put the back of my hand on the NB and SB heatsinks...yea, there pretty hot. Not scorching, but pretty warm....my CPU is doing fine as is my GPU....but when I put my hand on my PSU, its the hottest to the touch. I let my rig sit open and cool down, then pop the side back on and plug it in and power it on. The splash screen has changed to a different Win8 screen that instead of just the win8 logo and the loading circle, I see "Please Wait" below the logo and loading circle. The resolution is also a bit lower which tells me its probably going into recovery mode. The screen comes up for windows installation recovery. I select advanced options and then 'fix OS' (paraphrasing ....but its the one on the bottom left with the <...> symbol, I believe) It says that it cannot repair the OS. So I attempt to go back to a previous restore point. After about 10 minutes, I'm booting back into Windows, the screen clicks off and on after POST and I'm in business. PC is A-OK now.


TLDR: I write all of this to ask this question: What did I do wrong?? I described my process as best I could and omitted nothing. I am very new to OCing anything, but i scour forms (mainly toms and overclock.net) for days and weeks before ever touching my BIOS, as I believe you should be as best informed as you can be before tinkering with timings, multipliers, VOLTAGES, and the like.... My build is listed if you hover/click on my avatar. I look forward to hearing any constructive criticism or advice anyone has!

Thanks!
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about experienced worst scare build ram win8 corsair vengeance 2x4gb 1600 custom timings
  1. Noone? Really?
  2. thecynicalmonk said:
    So I was following a post on Tom's about different timings for my Corsair Vengeance C9 1600 DDR3s. I proceeded to boot into BIOS and set all settings to default, then I adjusted my ram speed to 1600 from the default (Auto), my timings to 7-9-7-10 as suggested by the tom's post i referenced, and adjusted my DRAM voltage from 1.5v to 1.6, again, as the post suggested. Now I totally understand that every board is different and different hardware match-ups yield MUCH different results, I'm new to OCing but not in the least bit new to computer building/ tweaking and such.

    Next, the scare. I boot my computer after each increment and run MaxxMem to confirm performance boost/loss. My rig POSTs and runs through the usual splash screen, no sign of safe mode or the like....then the monitor turns off and back on, signifying that its loading the GPU drivers...goood, good...and then...NOTHING. The HD is being read, my hard drive disk access light is going wild on my case, so things are happening. But, nothing onscreen.

    I calmly unplug my case and sit it on top of my desk, pop off the side and ground myself as i pop the ram out and reseat the DIMMs. I put the back of my hand on the NB and SB heatsinks...yea, there pretty hot. Not scorching, but pretty warm....my CPU is doing fine as is my GPU....but when I put my hand on my PSU, its the hottest to the touch. I let my rig sit open and cool down, then pop the side back on and plug it in and power it on. The splash screen has changed to a different Win8 screen that instead of just the win8 logo and the loading circle, I see "Please Wait" below the logo and loading circle. The resolution is also a bit lower which tells me its probably going into recovery mode. The screen comes up for windows installation recovery. I select advanced options and then 'fix OS' (paraphrasing ....but its the one on the bottom left with the <...> symbol, I believe) It says that it cannot repair the OS. So I attempt to go back to a previous restore point. After about 10 minutes, I'm booting back into Windows, the screen clicks off and on after POST and I'm in business. PC is A-OK now.


    TLDR: I write all of this to ask this question: What did I do wrong?? I described my process as best I could and omitted nothing. I am very new to OCing anything, but i scour forms (mainly toms and overclick.net) for days and weeks before ever touching my BIOS, as I believe you should be as best informed as you can be before tinkering with timings, multipliers, VOLTAGES, and the like.... My build is listed if you hover/click on my avatar. I look forward to hearing any constructive criticism or advice anyone has!

    Thanks!


    Did you do both operations at the same time - i.e., tighten up the timings and increase the voltage?

    Generally speaking, working on the ram is no different than working on the cpu - baby steps until it will no longer boot, then back it off a little. Your ram should have one or more XMP profiles - typically they will up the speed at an increased voltage. The bios should have an "auto" method to set this in your profile. You should not need to manually tweak the ram if you use the auto feature to select the most appropriate XMP setting. Today's ram (at least the higher quality like yours) are usually pretty good using the auto settings. Cheaper ram might benefit from manually tweaking timings and voltage, but yours should be fine using the auto.

    What probably happened is the combination of manually tweaking both the timings and the voltage in relatively large amounts caused the system to lock up and go into a boot loop. When the system couldn't get past its boot sequence, it "defaulted" back to a lesser setting (resolution, etc.) in an effort to compensate. When it couldn't find a correct "image" to boot, it gave you the "can't repair" message. When you used the restore point, your os forgot about earlier problems and went ahead as if nothing happened.

    Re-check your bios and try the auto settings to enable XMP -- anything past that would probably not be worth the effort. Also - be sure to run memtest for a few hours to insure no damage was done to the ram -- unlikely, but check anyway.

    Mark
  3. Best answer
    You are running an AMD system so XMP profiles will not be available in the bios.
    Download CPU-Z . run it and click on the SPD tab on the top.
    Here it will show you all supported speeds and timings for your modules.
    First set it to the fastest supported speed and voltages and test using Prime 95 torture test Blend mode. (XMP profiles are Intel optimized).
    If all is good then change 1 (ONE) value at a time in bios and retest.
    Change 1 value and retest.
    Change 1 value and retest.
    When it fails go back to the last good value and move to the next value and repeat .
    Example

    9-9-9-27-36=good
    8-9-9-27-36=good
    7-9-9-27-36=fail
    8-8-9-27-36=good
    8-7-9-27-36=good
    8-6-9-27-36= fail
    8-7-8-27-36=good
    8-7-7-27-36=fail
    8-7-8-24-36=good
    8-7-8-21-36=fail
    8-7-8-24-32=good
    8-7-8-24-28=fail
    8-7-8-24-32 would need to be thoroughly tested with at least 7 passes of MemTest86 and 24 hours of Prime95 blend torture test to be considered stable. Although I have seen machines pass these tests and still be unstable running Folding @ Home which maxes everything to its fullest.
    Seems like a lot of work but if you want to do it right it is the only method to ensure complete stability when overclocking.
    I have had the overclocking bug since 1996 ant there is no known cure.

    Our systems are similar if you hoover you mouse on my avatar you can see mine. if you get a non boot scenario you will need to reset the bios with the CMOS button or jumper with the power off.
  4. Unolocogringo said:
    You are running an AMD system so XMP profiles will not be available in the bios.
    Download CPU-Z . run it and click on the SPD tab on the top.
    Here it will show you all supported speeds and timings for your modules.
    First set it to the fastest supported speed and voltages and test using Prime 95 torture test Blend mode. (XMP profiles are Intel optimized).
    If all is good then change 1 (ONE) value at a time in bios and retest.
    Change 1 value and retest.
    Change 1 value and retest.
    When it fails go back to the last good value and move to the next value and repeat .
    Example

    9-9-9-27-36=good
    8-9-9-27-36=good
    7-9-9-27-36=fail
    8-8-9-27-36=good
    8-7-9-27-36=good
    8-6-9-27-36= fail
    8-7-8-27-36=good
    8-7-7-27-36=fail
    8-7-8-24-36=good
    8-7-8-21-36=fail
    8-7-8-24-32=good
    8-7-8-24-28=fail
    8-7-8-24-32 would need to be thoroughly tested with at least 7 passes of MemTest86 and 24 hours of Prime95 blend torture test to be considered stable. Although I have seen machines pass these tests and still be unstable running Folding @ Home which maxes everything to its fullest.
    Seems like a lot of work but if you want to do it right it is the only method to ensure complete stability when overclocking.
    I have had the overclocking bug since 1996 ant there is no known cure.

    Our systems are similar if you hoover you mouse on my avatar you can see mine.


    Oops - my bad. Didn't notice it was AMD. Nice catch and good advice!!
  5. Unolocogringo said:
    You are running an AMD system so XMP profiles will not be available in the bios.
    Download CPU-Z . run it and click on the SPD tab on the top.
    Here it will show you all supported speeds and timings for your modules.
    First set it to the fastest supported speed and voltages and test using Prime 95 torture test Blend mode. (XMP profiles are Intel optimized).
    If all is good then change 1 (ONE) value at a time in bios and retest.
    Change 1 value and retest.
    Change 1 value and retest.
    When it fails go back to the last good value and move to the next value and repeat .
    Example

    9-9-9-27-36=good
    8-9-9-27-36=good
    7-9-9-27-36=fail
    8-8-9-27-36=good
    8-7-9-27-36=good
    8-6-9-27-36= fail
    8-7-8-27-36=good
    8-7-7-27-36=fail
    8-7-8-24-36=good
    8-7-8-21-36=fail
    8-7-8-24-32=good
    8-7-8-24-28=fail
    8-7-8-24-32 would need to be thoroughly tested with at least 7 passes of MemTest86 and 24 hours of Prime95 blend torture test to be considered stable. Although I have seen machines pass these tests and still be unstable running Folding @ Home which maxes everything to its fullest.
    Seems like a lot of work but if you want to do it right it is the only method to ensure complete stability when overclocking.
    I have had the overclocking bug since 1996 ant there is no known cure.

    Our systems are similar if you hoover you mouse on my avatar you can see mine. if you get a non boot scenario you will need to reset the bios with the CMOS button or jumper with the power off.


    Wow! I had no idea the OC process goes so slowly. Do you think i screwed anything up doing what i did?
  6. No you did not go crazy on the voltage so I would be 99% sure nothing was damaged. You just set timings that were not compatible with your memory and motherboard.
    Just take it nice and slow. Always test before running other programs. Windows writes whatever is in the memory back to the hard drive during shut down. If you have memory errors then these will be written to the hard drive causing the scare you had before.
    A good option I use is a dual boot setup for overclock testing. that way my main OS never gets corrupted.
  7. Unolocogringo said:
    No you did not go crazy on the voltage so I would be 99% sure nothing was damaged. You just set timings that were not compatible with your memory and motherboard.
    Just take it nice and slow. Always test before running other programs. Windows writes whatever is in the memory back to the hard drive during shut down. If you have memory errors then these will be written to the hard drive causing the scare you had before.
    A good option I use is a dual boot setup for overclock testing. that way my main OS never gets corrupted.


    Ok, that makes me feel alot better. And I'll probably set up a dual boot just for that reason....though I dont want to corrupt my Ubuntu partition either....does linux work the same way as windows when it comes to writing the memory before shutdown?

    (Sidenote: I'm regretting my choice of ram now. The Vengeance is mid level enthusiast ram at best.)
  8. Sorry I can't help on that one. I know nothing about any of the Linux operating systems.
    I do know that a usb bootable version is available. I would think that would serve your purpose.

    With the memory controllers on the CPU, ram overclocking does not give the same benefits that it did in years past. Now memory commands are directly from the cpu to memory without having to go through the northbridge, which added considerable latency. Normally 1 to 3% gain in benchmarks at best unless you are using integrated video.
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