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Dual channel memory question.

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  • Dual Channel
  • Components
  • Memory
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April 23, 2013 8:26:03 PM

In a dual channel architecture do I have to use up 2 sponsor can I use just one of them?

Thanks.

More about : dual channel memory question

a b } Memory
April 23, 2013 8:33:37 PM

In order to get dual channel throughput, two identical modules are needed (usually placed in the same color slots). A single module will give you single channel only although you will still get double data rate from the single module
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April 23, 2013 8:35:56 PM

C12Friedman said:
In order to get dual channel throughput, two identical modules are needed (usually placed in the same color slots). A single module will give you single channel only although you will still get double data rate from the single module


So...what's the advantage of dual channel memory? If it gives the same amount of data rate then should I just go with single channel?
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April 23, 2013 8:42:15 PM

Nashidixit51 said:
C12Friedman said:
In order to get dual channel throughput, two identical modules are needed (usually placed in the same color slots). A single module will give you single channel only although you will still get double data rate from the single module


So...what's the advantage of dual channel memory? If it gives the same amount of data rate then should I just go with single channel?

I think he meant because you are presumably using some sort of "ddr" memory you always get your double data rate (ddr), regardless whether you run it single or dual channel mode. When you run your ddr ram in dual channel mode, however, you will get double that rate again. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-channel_memory_archi...
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a b } Memory
April 23, 2013 8:45:12 PM

Nashidixit51 said:
C12Friedman said:
In order to get dual channel throughput, two identical modules are needed (usually placed in the same color slots). A single module will give you single channel only although you will still get double data rate from the single module


So...what's the advantage of dual channel memory? If it gives the same amount of data rate then should I just go with single channel?


C12 is incorrect a single module will give you half speed. Say you buy DDR3-1600, If you install only one module it will run at 800Mhz (not 1,600Mhz), If you install 2 modules you will run at the full 1,600 Mhz.
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April 23, 2013 8:48:37 PM

Snipergod87 said:
C12 is incorrect a single module will give you half speed. Say you buy DDR3-1600, If you install only one module it will run at 800Mhz (not 1,600Mhz), If you install 2 modules you will run at the full 1,600 Mhz.

That doesn't sound right to me. Your RAM should run at the clock speed specified in the BIOS regardless if you run it dual (or triple) channel or not. I understand dual channel doubles the DATA rate by doubling the size of the bus, NOT the clock speed.
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a b } Memory
April 23, 2013 8:56:27 PM

nitrium said:
Snipergod87 said:
C12 is incorrect a single module will give you half speed. Say you buy DDR3-1600, If you install only one module it will run at 800Mhz (not 1,600Mhz), If you install 2 modules you will run at the full 1,600 Mhz.

That doesn't sound right to me. Your RAM should run at the clock speed specified in the BIOS regardless if you run it dual (or triple) channel or not. I understand dual channel doubles the DATA rate by doubling the size of the bus, NOT the clock speed.


Doh you are right, I mis-spoke. What I meant to say was the MT's drop from 1600 to 800 in single channel mode.
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April 23, 2013 9:12:27 PM

nitrium said:
Nashidixit51 said:
C12Friedman said:
In order to get dual channel throughput, two identical modules are needed (usually placed in the same color slots). A single module will give you single channel only although you will still get double data rate from the single module


So...what's the advantage of dual channel memory? If it gives the same amount of data rate then should I just go with single channel?

I think he meant because you are presumably using some sort of "ddr" memory you always get your double data rate (ddr), regardless whether you run it single or dual channel mode. When you run your ddr ram in dual channel mode, however, you will get double that rate again. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-channel_memory_archi...


So, this is what I understand so far.

If I buy single then I get 1600 but if I buy dual channel then I get 3200?
Please correct me if I am wrong.
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a b } Memory
April 23, 2013 9:17:27 PM

Nashidixit51 said:
nitrium said:
Nashidixit51 said:
C12Friedman said:
In order to get dual channel throughput, two identical modules are needed (usually placed in the same color slots). A single module will give you single channel only although you will still get double data rate from the single module


So...what's the advantage of dual channel memory? If it gives the same amount of data rate then should I just go with single channel?

I think he meant because you are presumably using some sort of "ddr" memory you always get your double data rate (ddr), regardless whether you run it single or dual channel mode. When you run your ddr ram in dual channel mode, however, you will get double that rate again. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-channel_memory_archi...


So, this is what I understand so far.

If I buy single then I get 1600 but if I buy dual channel then I get 3200?
Please correct me if I am wrong.


If you buy single you will get 1600 but it effective bandwidth would be half. If you buy two, you still operate at 1600 but the bandwidth would be doubled
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a c 152 } Memory
April 23, 2013 9:44:07 PM

Everyone in this thread needs to read up on the actual benefits of dual channel vs single channel. Real world gains are in the 5% to 7% range. So while there is not a huge performance loss in running single channel there is enough of a loss you would not want to do it when building a high performance system.

Single and dual or even quad channel do not effect the speed of the RAM. If you buy DDR3 1600 it will run at DDR3 1600 no matter how many sticks you use at once. DDR = double data rate. The speed of a DDR3 1600 module is actually 800Mhz but that is doubled due to transferring data on both the rising and falling edges of the clock signal.

C12Friedman's post is correct.
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