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Haswell CPU Question, please help

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April 25, 2013 1:18:44 AM

Hi, I was wondering exactly what haswell is, I understand that it is intels new set of CPU's that they will release but what is the difference between haswell and ivy bridge? also will it work with my computers components, I will get a new motherboard when and if I get a Haswell CPU for compatibility, anything else I need to know?

My CURRENT specs:

CPU: Intel core i5 3470 @ 3.20Ghz
GPU: Nvidia GT 640 2GB
RAM: Kingston Hyper X 1600MHZ 8GB
MB: Gigabyte GA-B75M-D3H
1TB WD Blue HDD
Windows 8

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April 25, 2013 1:37:03 AM

difference is that it comes with a new type of socket lga1150 if im not wrong
and 10-13% more performance compared to its predecessor.

like 4770K is %10 more efficient than 3770K eventhough they are working on same frequency
just like that...
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a c 228 à CPUs
April 25, 2013 1:38:50 AM

Haswell will be the new CPU line from Intel. It uses an LGA 1150 motherboard with an 8x series chipset. It is not compatible with your Ivy Bridge based LGA 1155 setup. You would need a new motherboard as well as the new CPU.

Haswell will be roughly 10% faster clock for clock than Ivy Bridge is. Meaning if you have 1 Haswell CPU at 3Ghz and 1 Ivy CPU at 3Ghz side by side the Haswell processor would be 10% faster.

The LGA 1150 boards will be compatible with Broadwell when it is released next year as well probably needing a BIOS update like early LGA 1155 boards designed for Sandy Bridge will work with Ivy Bridge with a BIOS update. Likely there will be new boards when Broadwell comes out based on the same LGA 1150 platform but with DDR 4 support.
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a b à CPUs
April 25, 2013 1:41:39 AM

With your setup i'd just wait for Broadwell, use money on a 670 instead for now
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April 25, 2013 1:42:47 AM

It's the next generation of Intel's CPU's.

It will have slightly better performance and hopefully be much more efficient.

Yes, you will need to buy a new Motherboard to support the new CPU, all your existing hardware will be completely compatible with the new gear, so you don'y have to worry about a thing.
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a c 116 à CPUs
April 25, 2013 1:47:03 AM

Intel are using the "Tick-Tock" upgrade cycle. A Tock is when a new CPU architecture is introduced, right now that is Sandy Bridge. A Tick is a CPU die shrink, which improves on manufacturing costs and also typically improves on the Tock with some tweaking of the architecture and typically throwing more transistors at it (Ivy Bridge currently). Typically on either a tock or tick you can see a rough 10% performance improvement as well as a drop in power consumption.
Haswell is a Tock upgrade, so a different underlying architecture to what the current gen CPU's use. Broadwell is its Tick, with it shrinking down to a 14nm process.

There are some other things as well.
- Haswell will have integrated VRM (Voltage Vegulation Modules) built into the CPU, meaning that how high you can overclock isn't dependent on the motherboard. This means you can buy a cheap-as motherboard and overclock just as well as someone with a high end board.
- The integrated GPU will be far more powerful than what is present in the Ivy Bridge chips.
- Much lower power consumption for the mobile processors.

So, add all that together and you get...
A product that doesnt really appeal to anyone with a Ivy processor. General consensus is that Haswell will be big for the mobile space because of the aforementioned power consumption and integrated graphics, but nothing special when it comes to desktops, just the typical 10% performance upgrade we expect and nothing else really.

IMO, unless for some reason you need a stronger CPU in the near future (so a Haswell i7 would be a good buy), dont bother upgrading.
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April 25, 2013 1:49:09 AM

manofchalk said:
Intel are using the "Tick-Tock" upgrade cycle. A Tock is when a new CPU architecture is introduced, right now that is Sandy Bridge. A Tick is a CPU die shrink, which improves on manufacturing costs and also typically improves on the Tock with some tweaking of the architecture and typically throwing more transistors at it (Ivy Bridge currently). Typically on either a tock or tick you can see a rough 10% performance improvement as well as a drop in power consumption.
Haswell is a Tock upgrade, so a different underlying architecture to what the current gen CPU's use. Broadwell is its Tick, with it shrinking down to a 14nm process.

There are some other things as well.
- Haswell will have integrated VRM (Voltage Vegulation Modules) built into the CPU, meaning that overclocking now isn't dependent on the motherboard. This means you can buy a cheap as motherboard and overclock just as well as someone with a high end board.
- The integrated GPU will be far more powerful than what is present in the Ivy Bridge chips.
- Much lower power consumption for the mobile processors.

So, add all that together and you get...
A product that doesnt really appeal to anyone with a Ivy processor. General consensus is that Haswell will be big for the mobile space because of the aforementioned power consumption and integrated graphics, but nothing special when it comes to desktops, just the typical 10% performance upgrade we expect and nothing else really.

IMO, unless for some reason you need a stronger CPU in the near future (so a Haswell i7 would be a good buy), dont bother upgrading.


good point of view. i like that :) 
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a c 228 à CPUs
April 25, 2013 10:12:06 AM

While I actually agree with the choice the best answer in this thread was selected by someone who had no business selecting it when the thread was only 40 minutes old. The OP was not even given a chance.
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April 25, 2013 11:11:55 AM

n1ghtr4v3n said:
difference is that it comes with a new type of socket lga1150 if im not wrong
and 10-13% more performance compared to its predecessor.

like 4770K is %10 more efficient than 3770K eventhough they are working on same frequency
just like that...


Toms preview claims its more like 7-10% just like previus core gens.
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a c 116 à CPUs
April 25, 2013 3:10:41 PM

anort3 said:
While I actually agree with the choice the best answer in this thread was selected by someone who had no business selecting it when the thread was only 40 minutes old. The OP was not even given a chance.


Yeah, the new forum is weird like that.

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April 25, 2013 3:27:16 PM

manofchalk said:
Intel are using the "Tick-Tock" upgrade cycle. A Tock is when a new CPU architecture is introduced, right now that is Sandy Bridge. A Tick is a CPU die shrink, which improves on manufacturing costs and also typically improves on the Tock with some tweaking of the architecture and typically throwing more transistors at it (Ivy Bridge currently). Typically on either a tock or tick you can see a rough 10% performance improvement as well as a drop in power consumption.
Haswell is a Tock upgrade, so a different underlying architecture to what the current gen CPU's use. Broadwell is its Tick, with it shrinking down to a 14nm process.

There are some other things as well.
- Haswell will have integrated VRM (Voltage Vegulation Modules) built into the CPU, meaning that how high you can overclock isn't dependent on the motherboard. This means you can buy a cheap-as motherboard and overclock just as well as someone with a high end board.
- The integrated GPU will be far more powerful than what is present in the Ivy Bridge chips.
- Much lower power consumption for the mobile processors.

So, add all that together and you get...
A product that doesnt really appeal to anyone with a Ivy processor. General consensus is that Haswell will be big for the mobile space because of the aforementioned power consumption and integrated graphics, but nothing special when it comes to desktops, just the typical 10% performance upgrade we expect and nothing else really.

IMO, unless for some reason you need a stronger CPU in the near future (so a Haswell i7 would be a good buy), dont bother upgrading.


Would you say I´m safe If I get and Ivy 3570k for a gaming system right now? There is a sale of intel CPU in my local shop.
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a c 116 à CPUs
April 25, 2013 10:55:53 PM

If you dont have a rig right now, go for it. A 3570k will be a decent enough gaming CPU long into the future, I'm banking on mine being sufficient until Skylake.
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