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Chipset-based,Windows-native RAID0 data recovery with Ubuntu

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April 25, 2013 8:29:18 AM

I have a RAID0 volume on a computer with a dead motherboard. I wish to use Ubuntu to access the volume from a different computer and retrieve the data, either by creating a copy of the volume's contents on a separate single hard drive (I do have one that matches the volume's capacity), or by selectively copying the data, whichever is more convenient.

This RAID0 volume uses the motherboard's built-in RAID support (which, in this case, translates to Intel RAID controller). The volume is Windows-based, as is all the data present (though I do not believe this is relevant for the recovery operation, but correct me if I'm wrong.)

My knowledge of Ubuntu is limited enough that I do not know how to do this and, thus, I need detailed guidance throughout the process. I found another thread with a similar issue: <http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/252965-32-transfer-ra...;

However, I do not know how much of that information is still up-to-date, and I could use more details. Also, note that a motherboard replacement is not an alternative.

Currently, I have a bootable Ubuntu USB available, loaded with Quantal Quetzal. I have no trouble swapping it for a different version of Ubuntu if necessary. Please advise.

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a c 75 V Motherboard
April 25, 2013 9:21:24 AM
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Sinc eits a hardware raid controlled by the motherboard, then a Linux Live CD should be able to access the data as they can read NTFS drives.
April 25, 2013 9:35:02 AM

das_stig said:
Sinc eits a hardware raid controlled by the motherboard, then a Linux Live CD should be able to access the data as they can read NTFS drives.



Even if it's a different motherboard with a different chipset than the one in which the RAID volume was originally created?

Will this happen automatically, or do I have to enter any specific commands/enable specific modules?
Related resources
a b V Motherboard
April 27, 2013 11:11:27 AM

Motherboard based RAID is NOT hardware RAID, it's what's known as "fake RAID". All of the real RAID functions take place in OS specific drivers. If you move the array to another motherboard (even if the RAID chip/s are identical) your RAID will be broken. In the case of RAID0, once the array is broken, recovery is extremely difficult to impossible.
April 27, 2013 2:29:09 PM

ex_bubblehead said:
Motherboard based RAID is NOT hardware RAID, it's what's known as "fake RAID". All of the real RAID functions take place in OS specific drivers. If you move the array to another motherboard (even if the RAID chip/s are identical) your RAID will be broken. In the case of RAID0, once the array is broken, recovery is extremely difficult to impossible.


I thank you for your reply, and I am aware of that, but I need specific aid with the solution avenue I wish to attempt. Ubuntu does contain a package that recognizes and operates RAID volumes based upon different controllers.

I know Ubuntu can do what I need, what I don't know is how to make that work.

The post from the link I provided already contains the instructions to solve the problem, the reason I'm asking for extra help is because I don't know Ubuntu well enough. I need more details than the ones provided there, especially considering I'm running into issues the post did not mention.
a b V Motherboard
April 27, 2013 3:36:43 PM

The nature of your questions and replies would indicate that you do not possess the requisite skill set necessary to successfully recover a broken RAID0 array. However, if you wish to continue down that path knock yourself out. You may want to view this for further information.
April 28, 2013 10:26:22 AM

ex_bubblehead said:
The nature of your questions and replies would indicate that you do not possess the requisite skill set necessary to successfully recover a broken RAID0 array. However, if you wish to continue down that path knock yourself out. You may want to view this for further information.


I was straightforward when I said I did not have the skills or the knowledge to pull this off. That is why I asked for specialized help.

In any case, I already managed to recover all of the data. I was having trouble with the USB Ubuntu bootable drive I was using, so I tried a CD instead.

The RAID volume was automatically detected as such without any user input, and I managed to copy all of the data.

Thank you for the link to that article, I will keep that information for future reference, I was unable to find much on that subject.
April 28, 2013 10:28:37 AM

das_stig said:
Sinc eits a hardware raid controlled by the motherboard, then a Linux Live CD should be able to access the data as they can read NTFS drives.


I was so convinced I needed to research this throroughly before attempting anything, that I neglected the value of experimentation. I was unable to understand the simplicity of your solution until I tried it: the RAID volume was detected automatically.
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