Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Equivalent to CUDA in AMD ATI GPU

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
April 27, 2013 11:00:50 AM

What is Cuda ? Is this type of technology available to ATI graphics card ??
a b À AMD
April 27, 2013 11:07:18 AM

It's Nvidia's GPGPU platform. AMD uses OpenCL for similar purposes.
m
0
l
April 27, 2013 11:07:43 AM

CUDA is proprietary to nVidia products, and allows GPGPU from c code. ATI originally had their own "Close To Metal" API but have moved on to primarily exposing GPGPU abilities through OpenCL instead.
m
0
l
Related resources
a b À AMD
April 27, 2013 11:24:12 AM

Yeah it's worth noting OpenCL is freely available, so Nvidia works with that too (though performance may not always be great). AMD cannot use CUDA.
m
0
l
a b À AMD
April 27, 2013 12:16:32 PM

OpenCL is a cross platform GPU computing system that will run on either AMD/ATI or Nvidia or even Intels new graphics. It also has CPU fallback.
m
0
l
April 27, 2013 11:51:08 PM

Ok I get it, AMD has its own technology and uses OpenCL so which brand is better in gaming and performance.
m
0
l
a b À AMD
April 28, 2013 12:18:52 AM

For single GPU solutions, they are neck and neck. AMD has some crossfire issues though.

Also the budget end tends to favor AMD.
m
0
l
April 28, 2013 12:34:13 AM

smeezekitty said:
For single GPU solutions, they are neck and neck. AMD has some crossfire issues though.

Also the budget end tends to favor AMD.


Oh then AMD is always lower in prices than NVidia, In Dual GPU option SLI is better?
m
0
l
a b À AMD
April 28, 2013 12:49:19 AM

Buying Considerations

Like most tech products, graphics cards are segmented by price. Expensive cards tend to be more capable; and less expensive ones usually offer lower performance, consume less power, and are smaller in size (and so fit into a greater range of PC cases).

$400 and Up

The highest-priced cards deliver the strongest graphics performance, but they're also more power hungry. Both Nvidia and AMD have released a new generation of GPUs that are more power-efficient than their predecessors, but you'll still want a good 600-watt power supply to run these types of cards. At the extreme high end are dual-GPU cards, such as Nvidia's GTX 690. You can expect to spend close to $1000 for one of these.

One Nvidia GeForce GTX 680 or AMD Radeon HD 7970 Ghz should be able to run most games at high frame rates on 1080p monitors with settings at very high. Some games may show frame rate stuttering at ultra detail levels, so you'll need to test each game. If you have a high-end, 30-inch display running at 2560 by 1600, you'll need to manage your detail settings more carefully, unless you have a dual-GPU card, like the GTX 690, or are willing to install two discrete graphics cards.

$300 to $380

Cards in this category include the Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 and the AMD Radeon HD 7950. They offer performance that is nearly as good as that of the high-end models, but at a more modest price. If you stick with a 1080p or 1920 by 1200 display with one of these cards, you should be in good shape.

$200 to $300

At this level you may have to start making some sacrifices in detail settings. For GPUs such as the AMD Radeon HD 7870, that means running at "high" rather than at "very high" detail level, and it almost certainly means disabling antialiasing.

You should check each cards features see what interest you more and check current professional reviews of any card your interested in.
m
0
l
a b À AMD
April 28, 2013 12:49:38 AM

SoumyaHD said:
smeezekitty said:
For single GPU solutions, they are neck and neck. AMD has some crossfire issues though.

Also the budget end tends to favor AMD.


Oh then AMD is always lower in prices than NVidia, In Dual GPU option SLI is better?


I can't say AMD is always lower in prices, but they have a solid budget line. And SLI is better then crossfire right now.
m
0
l
!