How many Watts PSU will I need for a 16 Core Server

Here are the rest of the parts:

CPU:
Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2650
Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2650
Motherboard:
ASUS Z9PE-D8-WS Workstation Motherboard
Case:
Cooler Master Cosmos II RC-1200-KKN1 Tower Case
(Water Cooling may be installed later if too loud)
RAM:
Corsair® Vengeance® — 32GB DDR3 (4x8Gb)
GPU:
GeForce 210
Hard Drives:
WD VelociRaptor 1TB 10000 RPM
Western Digital Red 1TB
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  1. This is a really strange build, you would probably get much more bang for your buck if you asked the community for help and let us know what your intended usage scenario's were for this machine.

    16x 2ghz core's doesn't really sit in with with 32GB standard ddr3 (not registered, buffered or error correcting) and consumer level HDD's

    I am not sure this build qualifies as server hardware, but as a workstation pretty much any power supply 500W or greater would work for this.
  2. dalethepcman said:
    This is a really strange build, you would probably get much more bang for your buck if you asked the community for help and let us know what your intended usage scenario's were for this machine.

    16x 2ghz core's doesn't really sit in with with 32GB standard ddr3 (not registered, buffered or error correcting) and consumer level HDD's

    I am not sure this build qualifies as server hardware, but as a workstation pretty much any power supply 500W or greater would work for this.


    The usage would be for a medium sized server. Why is this not too good of a build for server? Also I think the memory was non-buffered and non-ecc?
  3. What type of server would you be using, Vsphere, Xenapp, Exchange, SQL?

    As for why this is not a good server build. No redundant power supply, no error correcting memory, not enough memory to run quad channel, no redundant storage (raid), consumer grade memory, consumer grade HDD.

    If you put something mission critical on this hardware and it has to run 24/7 expect a hard failure within the first year.

    If you buy ECC (error correcting) memory, and 3 or more RE (enterprise class) or SAS drives and set up a fault tolerant array, (raid 0, 10 or 5) then at least you could depend on this system's hardware not being a point of failure for a while.

    Redundant 500w PS case
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811192192

    3+ of these 1TB WD RE enterprise drive (made to run 24/7/365 for 5yr)
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822236356

    8X off these 4GB registered ECC memory certified to work with this board
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820139577

    These changes would only cost a couple hundred $'s more than what you currently have selected, but would provide years of additional uptime without an outage due to hardware failure.
  4. Alright I got an increase in budget and here is the new build:


    CPU:
    Intel® Xeon® Processor E5-2687W
    CPU Cooling:
    Intel Fan BXSTS200C
    Motherboard:
    Asus Z9PA-D8 Server Motherboard
    Case:
    Cooler Master Cosmos II RC-1200-KKN1 Tower Case
    RAM:
    Kingston 32Gb Server Ram (4x8Gb)
    Hard Drives:
    Intel 335 Series Jay Crest SSD 2.5" 240GB
    PSU:
    Corsair AX860i Digital Power Supply: 860 Watt

    Since my budget only allowed for one SSD should I instead get the HDD's you suggested or two less capacity SSDs and run RAID on them? Also are all these parts compatible, and will I need a separate CPU cooler?

    One more thing, is the ram I selected compatible with my motherboard and CPU?
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