Why AMD over Intel?

Just a curious question on why people would prefer AMD over Intel. I mean everyone is talking about the intel i cores (or whatever the whole series is called) when it comes to high end pcs, especially for gaming. What does AMD has to offer that Intel doesn't for a certain price point, say the i5-3570k?
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  1. AMD has cheaper motherboards. As an example:

    The ASRock 970 Pro3 (AMD) and the ASRock Pro3 Gen3 (Intel). They have the same features, but the AMD one costs £30 less.
    @ The price point of the i5 3570k, the 8350 is comparable in most games to it. In heavily-threaded games/programs such as Battlefield 3, Crysis 3, World Machine 2, etc.; the 8350 pulls ahead by a nice margin.

    Also, AMD's processors go down in price as time goes on. Intel's doesn't; if anything, intel processors get more expensive as the sockets are phased out.
  2. You could really boil it down to AMD systems are better value, their boards and chips are just cheaper and more feature packed, while Intel gives you the better performance.
    I actually would go for a 3570k over an 8350, IMO AMD are only better than Intel at the low end, their APU's against the Pentium lineup and the FX-6300 against the i3's. Though if your after multi-threaded performance and cant afford an i7, then an FX-8350 is a good option.
  3. Jonathan Wong said:
    Just a curious question on why people would prefer AMD over Intel. I mean everyone is talking about the intel i cores (or whatever the whole series is called) when it comes to high end pcs, especially for gaming. What does AMD has to offer that Intel doesn't for a certain price point, say the i5-3570k?


    ok... this is sorta a multi-point argument.

    1) AMD, especially the higher end ones (6300,8320,8350) are basically indistinguishable from higher end intel chips from a user perspective. granted, benchmarks can rank them, but generally speaking from an end user perspective you probably will never be able to tell the difference.

    2) AMD continues legacy support for a LONG time with their standard CPU sockets and encuragement of MB makers to make their mbs support the widest range of cpus possible. The AM2, AM2+, AM3, AM3+ are all a common chip socket (for example am2+ cpus are able to be plugged into am2, am2+ and am3 mbs... ). This means you can do cheap and easy upgrades to your system. Intel is notorious for killing socket designs after 1 or 2 gens...

    3) more fun to tinker with. you can't misunderstand the importance of this point. A Subaru WRX might be an awesome street racer, but it's almost impossible to work on and tinker with. A 1976 Camaro however, anyone with a standard wrench set can play with that beast all they want all day long. Enthusiasts tend to like to play with stuff. Overclocking an intel i series is almost babyish simple. Overclocking an AMD is an art, one that could take weeks (as opposed to intels hours) to get properly balanced and stable. Simply put, AMDs are more fun to tinker on.

    4) Price - you tend to get a lot of chip for not so much cash with AMD. Granted there are intel chips in every AMD price point. In some cases those intel chips are superior to a stock AMD. That said, anyone who buys an AMD chip to run it stock should be shot. The prices for their high end cpus are insanely low. Which makes them great buys if you're on a budget.
  4. So basically, if im not under a budget and i want to build a rig that lasts for at least 2-3 years for gaming, i should always look towards intel right?
  5. Jonathan Wong said:
    So basically, if im not under a budget and i want to build a rig that lasts for at least 2-3 years for gaming, i should always look towards intel right?


    No, but right now, yes (IMO anyway).
    Though really, I think an Ivy i5 or FX-8350 will last that long as a viable gaming chip. CPU's are starting to hit the point where we simply don't need more performance, at least for gaming anyway. I reckon any big shake-ups in gaming for near future will have more to do with GPU's and their compute capabilities (ala PhysX, TressFX, OpenCL and CUDA).
  6. Jonathan Wong said:
    So basically, if im not under a budget and i want to build a rig that lasts for at least 2-3 years for gaming, i should always look towards intel right?


    pretty much.

    atleast i don't suggest AMD to people who want something that works out of the box, and is the best around, money no object.

    to people who want to tinker and money is an object suddenly AMD becomes a viable alternative. Not at all price points... but there are certain ones (especially under $800) where AMD makes a lot of sense.

    That said, the difference between a high end AMD and a high end Intel are so small it's doubtful anyone could tell the difference in games our outside of them.
  7. ingtar33 said:
    Not at all price points... but there are certain ones (especially under $800) where AMD makes a lot of sense.


    Above $200 Intel dominates just by virtue of having chips there. If you want an AMD chip above an 8350, your looking into Opterons, which are server level chips on a non-consumer grade platform.
  8. What exactly can you "tinker" around with an AMD chip?
  9. I agree with manofchalk.
  10. manofchalk said:
    ingtar33 said:
    Not at all price points... but there are certain ones (especially under $800) where AMD makes a lot of sense.


    Above $200 Intel dominates just by virtue of having chips there. If you want an AMD chip above an 8350, your looking into Opterons, which are server level chips on a non-consumer grade platform.

    I'm talking about $800 total system price. Not cpu price.

    Jonathan Wong said:
    What exactly can you "tinker" around with an AMD chip?


    Overclocking. Generally speaking overclocking is one grand trial and error that can take weeks of playing to get right. Even if you're intimately familiar with a specific chip it can take hours to nail down propperly.

    I know i'm not alone when i say, I find overclocking AMD chips to be a lot of fun... a lot more fun then overclocking an intel anyway. (though the intel is infinitely simpler to overclock, it isn't anywhere near as satisfying to learn the ins and outs and little quarks of your cpu)
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