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advice building a pc

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May 6, 2013 12:35:52 AM

this pc is mainly for animation/modelling, video editing and gaming.
i want maximum performance without it heating up and making a lot of noise.
my budget is around $1500 excluding mouse, keyboard and monitor.

case: cosair obsidian 800d
gpu: EVGA geforce gtx650 Ti 2gb
motherboard: asus p8z77-v pro lga 1155 intel
cpu: intel i5-3570k
psu: cooler master silent pro 1000w
ram: corsair vengeance 2x8gb ddr3
hard disk: im thinking of getting either a hybrid hard disk or a ssd and hdd
optical drive: anything working will do

will this work?
this is my first time building a pc and i really need help asap.

edit: im sorry, my budget is around $1200, not 1500.

More about : advice building

May 6, 2013 12:47:53 AM

If your budget is $1500 then, if your video editing and gaming you can easily fit an i7 and a much better graphics card than a 650 Ti within your budget range. I say an Intel Core i7-3770 and a 650Ti Boost
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May 6, 2013 12:59:05 AM

550 - 660W if you're sticking with a single GPU setup, 750W if you plan to add another card, but not from Cooler Master. an 80 plus certified PSU from Seasonic, Corsair, Antec & XFX will do you just fine. unless you're making an advance water cooling rig, add in more than 2 GPUs and/or plan to add dozens of HDDS, you're never gonna use up to a 1000W.

consider a cheaper case, like Corsair's 300R/500R. unless you prefer to go for looks over practical performance, you're better off spending most of that case budget elsewhere.

with both out of the way, you should have a good deal of cash to spend on an i7-3770K, a CPU cooler (CM Hyper 212 EVO is highly recommended for a sub 4.2ghz OC), a better GPU and maybe an SSD.
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May 6, 2013 2:47:17 AM

what about a budget of $1200? an i7 costs around $100 more, and i plan to add another gpu in future so i think a 650 ti is ok for now..?
thenay said:
If your budget is $1500 then, if your video editing and gaming you can easily fit an i7 and a much better graphics card than a 650 Ti within your budget range. I say an Intel Core i7-3770 and a 660Ti Boost
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May 6, 2013 3:06:55 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($135.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($67.16 @ NCIX US)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($309.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($98.98 @ Outlet PC)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk III 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1180.03
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-06 06:06 EDT-0400)

There is a sapphire hd 7870 Oc. For only 190$. Good deal !
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May 6, 2013 3:17:48 AM

Or this MAAAAASIIVEVEVEVEVEEEEE POOOOOOWWWWWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($135.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($67.16 @ NCIX US)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($55.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: OCZ ZT 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1174.03
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-06 06:17 EDT-0400)
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May 6, 2013 4:03:30 AM

Here is a nice solid build for you

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($229.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Zalman CNPS9900ALED Ball Bearing CPU Cooler ($48.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($135.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($66.61 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($373.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Fractal Design Define R4 (Black Pearl) ATX Mid Tower Case ($98.98 @ Outlet PC)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS95 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.95 @ Amazon)
Total: $1149.47
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-06 07:03 EDT-0400)

Editted:

Sorry saw that it grab the microcenter price if you live close by one then good if not the actual total is $1235.65
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May 6, 2013 7:51:19 AM

i used this watt calculator thing http://support.asus.com/PowerSupply.aspx?SLanguage=en and they said if i were to have 2 of those gpu i'll need more than 750W :/ 
Marcopolo123 said:
Or this MAAAAASIIVEVEVEVEVEEEEE POOOOOOWWWWWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Outlet PC)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($135.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($67.16 @ NCIX US)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($55.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: OCZ ZT 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1174.03
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-06 06:17 EDT-0400)

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May 6, 2013 10:13:42 AM

Most PSU calculators tend to over calculate the wattage, which are even worse in PC hardware manufacturer sites like Antec, Cooler Master, Asus and even Newegg last i used it. even this, which is the first thing that pops up on Google when you search for a PSU calculator, being one of the more trusted site to most who have asked themselves how much wattage they need, tends to over calculate, though from what i can tell only slightly;

http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.js...

marcopolo123's PCpartpickers list the wattage at 541w. a quick calculation of an OCed 3570K + 2x7970's with the link above puts it 664W at worse, with a recommended head room at 714w. in real life, it wouldn't be weird for a 650W PSU to be able to run it, though people tend to advise others to add a little more headroom just to be safe.

real life experience; when i built my i3 + 6870 several years back, people kept telling me to get a 650W PSU. several months later, i see and hear of others running an i5+6870 with a 500W psu. that money spent on a 1000W PSU could be better used elsewhere if you're not adding a whole lot of fancy add-ons.

again, i cannot stress to you on just how wrong most, if not all PSU calculators from PC hardware manufacturer's sites are like that one from Asus.
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May 7, 2013 12:21:27 AM

Hazle said:
Most PSU calculators tend to over calculate the wattage, which are even worse in PC hardware manufacturer sites like Antec, Cooler Master, Asus and even Newegg last i used it. even this, which is the first thing that pops up on Google when you search for a PSU calculator, being one of the more trusted site to most who have asked themselves how much wattage they need, tends to over calculate, though from what i can tell only slightly;

http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.js...

marcopolo123's PCpartpickers list the wattage at 541w. a quick calculation of an OCed 3570K + 2x7970's with the link above puts it 664W at worse, with a recommended head room at 714w. in real life, it wouldn't be weird for a 650W PSU to be able to run it, though people tend to advise others to add a little more headroom just to be safe.

real life experience; when i built my i3 + 6870 several years back, people kept telling me to get a 650W PSU. several months later, i see and hear of others running an i5+6870 with a 500W psu. that money spent on a 1000W PSU could be better used elsewhere if you're not adding a whole lot of fancy add-ons.

again, i cannot stress to you on just how wrong most, if not all PSU calculators from PC hardware manufacturer's sites are like that one from Asus.


Couldn't answer it better myself, good job. :D 
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