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what would be a good Graphics card?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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May 6, 2013 3:15:04 PM

good graphics card for Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor with a Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard

More about : good graphics card

a b å Intel
a c 185 U Graphics card
May 6, 2013 3:44:38 PM

Buying Considerations

Like most tech products, graphics cards are segmented by price. Expensive cards tend to be more capable; and less expensive ones usually offer lower performance, consume less power, and are smaller in size (and so fit into a greater range of PC cases).

$400 and Up

The highest-priced cards deliver the strongest graphics performance, but they're also more power hungry. Both Nvidia and AMD have released a new generation of GPUs that are more power-efficient than their predecessors, but you'll still want a good 600-watt power supply to run these types of cards. At the extreme high end are dual-GPU cards, such as Nvidia's GTX 690. You can expect to spend close to $1000 for one of these.

One Nvidia GeForce GTX 680 or AMD Radeon HD 7970GHz should be able to run most games at high frame rates on 1080p monitors with settings at very high. If you have a high-end, 30-inch display running at 2560 by 1600, you'll need to manage your detail settings more carefully, unless you have a dual-GPU card, like the GTX 690, or are willing to install two discrete graphics cards.

$300 to $380

Cards in this category include the Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 and the AMD Radeon HD 7950. They offer performance that is nearly as good as that of the high-end models, but at a more modest price. If you stick with a 1080p or 1920 by 1200 display with one of these cards, you should be in good shape.

$200 to $300

At this level you may have to start making some sacrifices in detail settings. For GPUs such as the Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 and AMD Radeon HD 7870, that means running at "high" rather than at "very high" detail level, and it almost certainly means disabling antialiasing.

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May 6, 2013 3:47:09 PM

bigcyco1 said:
Buying Considerations

Like most tech products, graphics cards are segmented by price. Expensive cards tend to be more capable; and less expensive ones usually offer lower performance, consume less power, and are smaller in size (and so fit into a greater range of PC cases).

$400 and Up

The highest-priced cards deliver the strongest graphics performance, but they're also more power hungry. Both Nvidia and AMD have released a new generation of GPUs that are more power-efficient than their predecessors, but you'll still want a good 600-watt power supply to run these types of cards. At the extreme high end are dual-GPU cards, such as Nvidia's GTX 690. You can expect to spend close to $1000 for one of these.

One Nvidia GeForce GTX 680 or AMD Radeon HD 7970GHz should be able to run most games at high frame rates on 1080p monitors with settings at very high. If you have a high-end, 30-inch display running at 2560 by 1600, you'll need to manage your detail settings more carefully, unless you have a dual-GPU card, like the GTX 690, or are willing to install two discrete graphics cards.

$300 to $380

Cards in this category include the Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 and the AMD Radeon HD 7950. They offer performance that is nearly as good as that of the high-end models, but at a more modest price. If you stick with a 1080p or 1920 by 1200 display with one of these cards, you should be in good shape.

$200 to $300

At this level you may have to start making some sacrifices in detail settings. For GPUs such as the Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 and AMD Radeon HD 7870, that means running at "high" rather than at "very high" detail level, and it almost certainly means disabling antialiasing.


this doesnt answer my question you just made me have to think more.
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May 6, 2013 3:50:14 PM

Give us a budget and your needs...
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a b å Intel
a c 185 U Graphics card
May 6, 2013 3:51:48 PM

flaren45 said:
bigcyco1 said:
Buying Considerations

Like most tech products, graphics cards are segmented by price. Expensive cards tend to be more capable; and less expensive ones usually offer lower performance, consume less power, and are smaller in size (and so fit into a greater range of PC cases).

$400 and Up

The highest-priced cards deliver the strongest graphics performance, but they're also more power hungry. Both Nvidia and AMD have released a new generation of GPUs that are more power-efficient than their predecessors, but you'll still want a good 600-watt power supply to run these types of cards. At the extreme high end are dual-GPU cards, such as Nvidia's GTX 690. You can expect to spend close to $1000 for one of these.

One Nvidia GeForce GTX 680 or AMD Radeon HD 7970GHz should be able to run most games at high frame rates on 1080p monitors with settings at very high. If you have a high-end, 30-inch display running at 2560 by 1600, you'll need to manage your detail settings more carefully, unless you have a dual-GPU card, like the GTX 690, or are willing to install two discrete graphics cards.

$300 to $380

Cards in this category include the Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 and the AMD Radeon HD 7950. They offer performance that is nearly as good as that of the high-end models, but at a more modest price. If you stick with a 1080p or 1920 by 1200 display with one of these cards, you should be in good shape.

$200 to $300

At this level you may have to start making some sacrifices in detail settings. For GPUs such as the Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 and AMD Radeon HD 7870, that means running at "high" rather than at "very high" detail level, and it almost certainly means disabling antialiasing.


this doesnt answer my question you just made me have to think more.
There are many factors to consider your question is to vague glad i made you think more so you don't just jump the gun and buy something you shouldn't have. ;) 

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May 6, 2013 4:05:19 PM

bigcyco1 said:
flaren45 said:
bigcyco1 said:
Buying Considerations

Like most tech products, graphics cards are segmented by price. Expensive cards tend to be more capable; and less expensive ones usually offer lower performance, consume less power, and are smaller in size (and so fit into a greater range of PC cases).

$400 and Up

The highest-priced cards deliver the strongest graphics performance, but they're also more power hungry. Both Nvidia and AMD have released a new generation of GPUs that are more power-efficient than their predecessors, but you'll still want a good 600-watt power supply to run these types of cards. At the extreme high end are dual-GPU cards, such as Nvidia's GTX 690. You can expect to spend close to $1000 for one of these.

One Nvidia GeForce GTX 680 or AMD Radeon HD 7970GHz should be able to run most games at high frame rates on 1080p monitors with settings at very high. If you have a high-end, 30-inch display running at 2560 by 1600, you'll need to manage your detail settings more carefully, unless you have a dual-GPU card, like the GTX 690, or are willing to install two discrete graphics cards.

$300 to $380

Cards in this category include the Nvidia GeForce GTX 670 and the AMD Radeon HD 7950. They offer performance that is nearly as good as that of the high-end models, but at a more modest price. If you stick with a 1080p or 1920 by 1200 display with one of these cards, you should be in good shape.

$200 to $300

At this level you may have to start making some sacrifices in detail settings. For GPUs such as the Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 and AMD Radeon HD 7870, that means running at "high" rather than at "very high" detail level, and it almost certainly means disabling antialiasing.


this doesnt answer my question you just made me have to think more.
There are many factors to consider your question is to vague glad i made you think more so you don't just jump the gun and buy something you shouldn't have. ;) 


i went to a site called PC Part Picker and i picked out what i want for a computer are there any suggestions or comments or anything that i may be missing to build this computer. I already have a monitor,mouse,speakers,operating system and etc.
CPU Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core $183.56
CPU Cooler Zalman CNPS5X Performa $17.98
Motherboard Asus P8Z77-M Micro ATX LGA1155 $116.99
Memory Corsair Vengeance 12GB (3 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 $88.98
Storage Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM $76.98
Wireless Network Adapter Rosewill RNX-N150UBE 802.11b/g/n USB 2.0 $10.99
Case Raidmax ATX-298WBP ATX Mid Tower w/500W Power Supply $68.98
Total price:564.46
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a b å Intel
a c 185 U Graphics card
May 6, 2013 4:15:00 PM

You could save money by buying a H77 motherboard and dropping the cpu cooler the i5-3470 is not for overclocking so the stock cooler that comes with the cpu is fine and free.I don't recommend you buy Raidmax their products are pretty shitty and there power supplies are not reliable look here Tier 5 - Worst of the worst NOT RECOMMENDED. Replace ASAP if you have one. http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx
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a b U Graphics card
May 6, 2013 4:19:02 PM

raidmax power supply's are a definite NO.
known to go and take everything with it.
They are in the replace as soon as possible category. they don't even make good door stops.(too light weight)
http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx

Went to get the puppy a cookie and you beat me to it.
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a b U Graphics card
May 6, 2013 4:30:57 PM

Did not see a video card in your build.
There is a lot of good advice in this thread. You gave no budget for video card or monitor resolution. Or what you expect from your video card.
Bigcyco1 gave the best information any one could give without more information from you.
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May 6, 2013 4:53:57 PM

Unolocogringo said:
Did not see a video card in your build.
There is a lot of good advice in this thread. You gave no budget for video card or monitor resolution. Or what you expect from your video card.
Bigcyco1 gave the best information any one could give without more information from you.


thanks for telling me about the bad power supply ill just get a separate case and power supply than.I am looking for a graphics card for a budget around 150 and im not interested in overclocking because i don't know how to and would the MSI Z77A-GD65 Gaming ATX LGA1155 Motherboard be a better choice. I am new to this so im asking questions becasue i cant find the answers i need lol
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a b U Graphics card
May 6, 2013 6:15:44 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Two video cards in your price range. They are about the same performance and swap leads depending on the game.
Nice looking motherboard.
But very expensive . You are paying for LOOKS and marketing.
A good mid budget board.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
And another if you are going for a black theme.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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May 7, 2013 1:16:53 PM

Unolocogringo said:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Two video cards in your price range. They are about the same performance and swap leads depending on the game.
Nice looking motherboard.
But very expensive . You are paying for LOOKS and marketing.
A good mid budget board.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
And another if you are going for a black theme.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


ok sweet and what do you think would be a good power supply and case... i would like the case to look unique not a box with a sticker on it lol
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May 7, 2013 1:43:31 PM

Quote:
supplies are not reliable look here Tier 5 - Worst of the worst NOT RECOMMENDED. Replace ASAP if you have one.

I actually have Thermaltake TR2 and it works just fine for 3 years, maybe i just got lucky?
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a b U Graphics card
May 7, 2013 7:55:42 PM

flaren45 said:
Unolocogringo said:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Two video cards in your price range. They are about the same performance and swap leads depending on the game.
Nice looking motherboard.
But very expensive . You are paying for LOOKS and marketing.
A good mid budget board.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
And another if you are going for a black theme.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


ok sweet and what do you think would be a good power supply and case... i would like the case to look unique not a box with a sticker on it lol

For your build a 500-550 watt Seasonic ,XFX, Corsair or any power supply in the top three tiers in the link we provided.
Cases are a little difficult to suggest.
I have the Cooler Master 912 and like it a lot. Cools very well and has a rugged look to it.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
You can look at a lot more here I just posted a few budget casas that are good.
http://www.newegg.com/Computer-Cases/SubCategory/ID-7
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May 8, 2013 9:18:37 AM

Quote:
You have probably never loaded it enough to put it under stress.

You probably right, but i never thought about it 3 years ago :p . Anyway i'm planning to buy a new case and some sort of modular psu.
SilverStone ST75F-G Evolution 750W is a good choise? Given the fact that now i got 670 and have a plans for doing SLI someday..
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