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PC shutdowns and reboots under load or during games

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May 10, 2013 4:45:01 AM

I recently upgraded my pc with a new mobo, CPU, GPU, and RAM

Here is the componentlist;
Core; Intel i7 3770k
mobo; MSI Z77A-G45
RAM; Corsair Vengeance LP 2x4GB
GPU; XFX Radeon 7970 Black Edition
PSU; Techsolo GTP-680 (680W)
OS; Windows 7 Ultimate

After installing the OS I downloaded and installed AllBenchmark and started running it at 720p, after a minute or so the system shut down and rebooted.

So I decided to run the benchmark again this time monitoring the temperatures. The cpu temperatures never exceeded 60 °C and the GPU ditdn't get any hotter than 70°C untill the shutdown.

After this I tried running stresstests, first I tested the CPU, which runned perfectly there was no shutdown. secondly I tested the GPU first with FuMark than with MSI Kombustion,

The Furmark burn-in runned on 720p with 8xMSAA with a constant temperature of 72°C, with no shutdown.

The MSI kombustion Xtreme burn-in test ran smoothly at 720p with a constant temperature of 75°C, with no shutdown

But when I ran the MSI kombustion burn-in test at 1680x1050 (maximum screen resolution) the system shut down and rebooted again.

The PC also shutsdown when I try playing games like bioshock infinite, where it crashed during the main menu.

AC3 however ran smoothly for about 5 minutes but after I decided to quit the game, the system crashed during the process of quitting to the main menu.

I am totaly lost here can you guys help me out?
May 10, 2013 4:57:01 AM

How much Amps does the PSU have on the 12V line? I can't find much info about it on the internet. I'm suspecting the psu to be the culprit, a crappy psu is very likely to cause the issues you're having.
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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 4:57:28 AM

XFX's 79xx series coolers are the worst ones out there (even worse than stock cooling I think), and considering that MSI Kombuster causes it to shut down, that's the first place I'd look. It could also be the PSU though. What brand/wattage is it?

Check that both the fans are rotating properly. Also test your system off of the iGPU and see if it still crashes.

Most likely you're just going to have to RMA the card though, too high temps (assuming you haven't overclocked and have the latest drivers etc) are a definite sign of a dud card.

EDIT: Woah didn't see your PSU, that is almost certainly the culprit, disregard what I said above. AnandTech tested a TechSolo PSU and it died after 50% load. Get that firework outta your system or this could happen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yrijOqu5oR4

Replace it with something like the 550W from XFX or anything from Seasonic/Corsair and you'll be good to go.

LEAVE YOUR COMPUTER OFF, BAD PSUS CAN DAMAGE EVERYTHING

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a c 136 à CPUs
May 10, 2013 5:01:07 AM

You appear to be using a PSU-shaped object to power your system. Likely not capable of more than half its label cleanly, that Techsolo GTP-680 is likely unable to hold up its end of the log, causing the shutdowns. A quality 500W PSU should be able to power your rig. I would suggest a PSU made by Seasonic (their own, XFX, some Antec, some [high-end] Corsair), FSP (their own, some Antec), Enermax/LEPA (their own), or Superflower (Rosewill Capstone, new Kingwin).
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a c 136 à CPUs
May 10, 2013 5:03:34 AM

Marshallbradley has a point (I RMA'ed a XFX HD7970 for cooler problems), but usually you'd get artifacting or program crashes, not shutdowns, if the GPU is overheating.
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May 10, 2013 5:09:30 AM

your PSU is kind of crappy. that is the reason your pc is rebooting when is stressed and gets power hungry. get a psu wit at least 30A on the 12V rail. yours has 18A.
the pc case and the psu is a long term investment. buy the best ones and you will get to use them at least 5 years from now on :) 
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May 10, 2013 5:12:12 AM

misanthropiae said:

the pc case and the psu is a long term investment. buy the best ones and you will get to use them at least 5 years from now on :) 

+1 on this. I have a 4.5 year old Corsair power supply and the only reason I want to replace it, is because it won't be powerful enough for my planned upgrade.
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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 5:14:19 AM

That power supply only has a 21a 12v rail (here). Clearly insufficient for what you are running. You really need to get a solid psu from a reputable company such as corsair, seasonic, antec, fsp or the like.

Mark
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May 10, 2013 5:26:30 AM

Thank you all for answering I really needed a confirmation. I already had the idea it was the psu but I had my doubts. I am definitely going to replace it and in the meantime I am giving my GPU to a friend so he can test it in his system.

But is 550W really going to be enough?
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May 10, 2013 5:29:13 AM

Yes, 550W should be plenty. If you're planning on doing quite some overclocking, go for something more powerful.
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May 10, 2013 5:36:30 AM

Could it hurt to run on the iGPU while I wait for the new PSU?
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a c 136 à CPUs
May 10, 2013 5:37:39 AM

I am running an overclocked (1125MHz) HD7970 in a BTC-mining rig, and it is pulling 311W-321W out of the wall, with the card running at 96%-98%.
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May 10, 2013 5:39:48 AM

KingFerp said:
Could it hurt to run on the iGPU while I wait for the new PSU?


Even though the PSU is pretty bad, but you should be fine running on the iGPU. It's not like you can do a lot of gaming on it anyway.

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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 5:43:47 AM

Rather than looking at the wattage, try looking at the amperage available on the 12v rail(s). Roughly speaking, a pc will need ~150w for operation, UNLESS IT HAS A DISCRETE GPU. So, working from a base of 150w (which is about 14a), you will need additional amps to provide for the gpu, overclocking and other add-ons.

The 7970 ghz/black will pull ~230w (about 21a) - add that to your base of 14a and you will need about 35a minimum. Wattage is basically calculated at (V)olts X (A)mps = (W)atts. In your case, 110v x 35a = 385w in a perfect world. Since a psu does not operate at 100% efficiency, I tend to add at least 25% for "headroom", plus 20% for efficiency. 385w X 140% = 539w.

A 550w will be fine.

Mark
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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 6:00:00 AM

I qgree with the above posts fm Onus and Mark, 550W (from a decent brand) is plenty for your system, even if you were over clocking to the moon. Its better to get a very high quality 550w unit than a good 750w unit for your system. As Onus showed your system is likely to draw less than 400w, even over clocked.

I would err on the side of caution and not use your computer without a new PSU, but that's just me being overcautious probably.

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May 10, 2013 6:00:11 AM

markwp said:
Rather than looking at the wattage, try looking at the amperage available on the 12v rail(s). Roughly speaking, a pc will need ~150w for operation, UNLESS IT HAS A DISCRETE GPU. So, working from a base of 150w (which is about 14a), you will need additional amps to provide for the gpu, overclocking and other add-ons.

The 7970 ghz/black will pull ~230w (about 21a) - add that to your base of 14a and you will need about 35a minimum. Wattage is basically calculated at (V)olts X (A)mps = (W)atts. In your case, 110v x 35a = 385w in a perfect world. Since a psu does not operate at 100% efficiency, I tend to add at least 25% for "headroom", plus 20% for efficiency. 385w X 140% = 539w.

A 550w will be fine.

Mark


You calculated this with 110V, but I live in Belgium where the standard voltage 230V is, does this make a difference?
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May 10, 2013 6:16:39 AM

He made a little error in the calculation. You should multiply the amps by 12, which is the amount of volts on the rail you use.
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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 6:17:30 AM

No. Remember, your system uses 3.3, 5 and 12v. The transformer reduces whatever input voltage you have to usable pc voltages. The psu will produce draw fewer amps at 230v, but the actual power delivered will still be the same wattage. In fact, you may see slightly better efficiency at 230v since both sides of the circuit are "hot".

Edit to correct dyslexia

Mark
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May 10, 2013 6:21:16 AM

That's nonsense. The power supply takes a 230V input in his case. The amount of watts drawn from the wall will always be higher than what it outputs, because no power transformation is 100% lossles. The amount of watts a powersupply can deliver on a certain rail is calculated by multiplying that voltage (3.3, 5 and 12) by the amount of amps that are specified.
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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 6:29:26 AM

A PSU running at twice the input voltage will draw HALF the current (amps). The overall power (watts) stays the same. Look up Watt's law.
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May 10, 2013 6:34:20 AM

You claimed the PSU will produce fewer amps. Of course it will draw less amps from the wall. The outputted amps will still remain the same.
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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 6:42:01 AM

I see what you're saying. A dyslexic moment in choosing the incorrect word. Post edited
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a b à CPUs
May 10, 2013 6:46:04 AM

@Markwp I think the point that is trying to be made is that the amps drawn from the wall is irrelevant, it's the amperage provided to the system that actually matters (and realistically that won't change much at all between 110v and 230v). You also did make a slight calculation error as 110v * 35a certainly does not equal 385W. 12v * 35a = 420W is the correct calculation.

@OP Regardless of what has been calculated, 550W is plenty, no matter whether you're using 230v or a 110v supply (it'll probably make a 1-2% difference to efficiency, but that's really not going to matter). Check out the total system power consumption in the Tom's Hardware review of the 7970 Ghz Ed: Review. Only 314W. And that's with a 130W processor (the 3960X) compared to your processor which is only 77W.

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a c 136 à CPUs
May 10, 2013 7:57:36 AM

From earlier this morning:
Onus said:
I am running an overclocked (1125MHz) HD7970 in a BTC-mining rig, and it is pulling 311W-321W out of the wall, with the card running at 96%-98%.

The PSU happens to be a Seasonic X560, but as you can see I could be running on a 380W Earthwatts without problems.
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May 10, 2013 8:27:29 AM

We went to the store today and bought a corsair CX750 just to be sure and as a long term investment. Don't take this as an insult, I have been listening to your advise and I am very grateful of it!

So I installed it right away and ran the benchmarks en stress tests with out any problem so I guess my problem is fixed :) 
Thank you all very much for your time!
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a c 136 à CPUs
May 10, 2013 8:34:31 AM

I don't think anyone here needs to feel insulted; I certainly don't. I'm just glad the cheapie didn't kill anything before you could replace it.
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