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Is the SSD+HDD combo a really good idea?

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May 10, 2013 8:41:07 AM

Im planning to make an apu sytem. Im planning on getting a 64gb ssd for windows and a 500gb hdd for my apps, games, movies etc.

Based on my setup there, wouldnt getting an ssd be pointless if i wanted to just boot windows in 3-5 seconds? I mean if windows is just on the ssd, nothing else would speed up right? And also, wouldnt the start up applications on my hdd make booting into/logging into windows slower than the sdd? If there really is a point in getting an sdd with my setup, ill get it. Could you guys point out the pros here, if there are any? Thanks for reading. :) 
a c 353 G Storage
May 10, 2013 8:57:28 AM

You are correct, an SSD will ONLY speed up what is one the SSD.
I do not recommend a 64 gig SSD ( only about 48 Gig truely available). Personnaly I recommend the 120/128 gig size for a OS + PROGRAM SSD.

Myself One two desktops and a laptop, I have dual SSDs. One for OS + Programs and One for MOST often used Data files and Then My HDD for general storage/Back-up for SSDs.

Rather than getting a "SMALL" SSD just for OS, look at a Hybred drive that uses a 8 Gig SSD to cache a 750 Gig HDD. This will give you the Fast boot time coupled with the large HDD storage.
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a b G Storage
May 10, 2013 9:02:53 AM

With the ssd, your operating system would be more responsive. Also, yes if you have any applications set to start up on the hdd it will slow your boot down. You would simply have to install all your startup applications on the ssd, an easy fix. Unless you have extra room in your budget though, you would be better off getting a 1tb western digital black.
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May 10, 2013 9:18:10 AM

A Sandisk Readycache is a really good option as well. It's a 32gb cache SSD drive. It gives good boost in overall system speed and boot of OS and programs.
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May 10, 2013 9:21:41 AM

Yes, an SSD makes a noticeable difference on a high performance computer. If you are gaming or doing heavy-duty number crunching, then you don’t want your hard drive taking up time by loading requests from Windows. Windows doesn’t just load into your RAM and sit there; it’s dynamic and continuously cashes from hard drive to RAM to processor. So, it’s good to just let the fast SSD handle windows operations while freeing up your hard drive (or second SSD) to focus on the game.

Also, as Chief says, get a larger SSD. I’d advise at least 240GB.

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a c 863 G Storage
May 10, 2013 9:21:54 AM

Concur with Chief. Look to a 120/128.

You *can* squeeze it into a 64gb, but you'll fretting over space all the time.
My current C is a 128 Kingston, with 68gb taken. The only applications I don't have installed on the SSD is Steam games and MS Office. All other applications are installed on the SSD. Photoshop, Lightroom, PaintShop Pro, couple dozen utilities...all on the SSD.

Music/movies/docs live elsewhere.

At Newegg, 64GB drives are running $70-$90. 1208GB drives are $106-$150. If you can squeeze out the extra $50, a 128GB will amaze you.
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May 10, 2013 9:36:41 AM

Thanks guys. Ill try fitting a 128gb into my budget. Unrelated, do fm1 socket coolers work on fm2 socket mobos? I just had to ask since i plant to oc the a10. :) 
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