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Gaming setup for $3000, suggestions?

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May 12, 2013 7:08:04 PM

A buddy of mine wants me to build him a gaming rig (monitor included) for $3000. I have, somewhat, of a list together, but I wanted suggestions particularly on processors, Z77 vs X79 mobos, psu, and memory. Like;

-which processor is best for gaming now, and possibly the next few years with the next gen coming out?

-is an X79 mobo worth the added $$?

-what psu is good for SLI (or high-end GPUs)?

-when is more RAM (16Gb vs 8Gb) helpful?

If anyone wants to suggest an entire build, that would help a bunch. I'm pretty new to the PC scene myself and this is only the second build I've done.

Also, he loves 3D, so I thought an ASUS vg278h would be pretty good.

Thanks
May 12, 2013 7:29:29 PM



That site has really sub-par builds. It can be a decent reference, in a pinch, but it is not a substitute for actual advice.

Now then, here is a build he could use:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($316.16 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X60 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($117.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Phantom 820 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($199.75 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1050W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($186.08 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VG278H 120Hz 27.0" Monitor ($531.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $2996.30
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 22:24 EDT-0400)

Mind you, you can cut the price quite a bit and still get nearly-equal performance, but that meets the budget and is extremely powerful. If you want, I can post a more stripped-down version with more price-efficient component choices.

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May 12, 2013 7:40:17 PM

Shrewsie_B said:
A buddy of mine wants me to build him a gaming rig (monitor included) for $3000. I have, somewhat, of a list together, but I wanted suggestions particularly on processors, Z77 vs X79 mobos, psu, and memory. Like;

-which processor is best for gaming now, and possibly the next few years with the next gen coming out?

-is an X79 mobo worth the added $$?

-what psu is good for SLI (or high-end GPUs)?

-when is more RAM (16Gb vs 8Gb) helpful?

If anyone wants to suggest an entire build, that would help a bunch. I'm pretty new to the PC scene myself and this is only the second build I've done.

Also, he loves 3D, so I thought an ASUS vg278h would be pretty good.

Thanks


To answer your questions:

The most efficient processor at present is the i5-3570k. However, if you believe (as I do) that more and more games are going to start benefiting from Hyperthreading, an i7-3770k is worthwhile at that price range.

An X79 only supports the socket 2011 processors, which are grossly overpriced and not any better than the high-end socket 1155 processors for gaming.

That said, regarding processors, you should probably wait for Haswell, which is right around the corner.

Any large high-end PSU (SeaSonic would by my choice, as seen above) should be fine.

8 GB is all you need for present games, though 16 GB would be fairly valid future-proofing (though that's a forbidden word on this forum).
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May 12, 2013 7:43:12 PM

Jack Revenant said:


That site has really sub-par builds. It can be a decent reference, in a pinch, but it is not a substitute for actual advice.

Now then, here is a build he could use:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($316.16 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X60 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($117.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Phantom 820 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($199.75 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1050W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($186.08 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VG278H 120Hz 27.0" Monitor ($531.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $2996.30
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 22:24 EDT-0400)

Mind you, you can cut the price quite a bit and still get nearly-equal performance, but that meets the budget and is extremely powerful. If you want, I can post a more stripped-down version with more price-efficient component choices.



Great list! Thanks. I think I'll be going with Nvidia though
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May 12, 2013 7:44:39 PM

Shrewsie_B said:
A buddy of mine wants me to build him a gaming rig (monitor included) for $3000. I have, somewhat, of a list together, but I wanted suggestions particularly on processors, Z77 vs X79 mobos, psu, and memory. Like;

-which processor is best for gaming now, and possibly the next few years with the next gen coming out?

-is an X79 mobo worth the added $$?

-what psu is good for SLI (or high-end GPUs)?

-when is more RAM (16Gb vs 8Gb) helpful?

If anyone wants to suggest an entire build, that would help a bunch. I'm pretty new to the PC scene myself and this is only the second build I've done.

Also, he loves 3D, so I thought an ASUS vg278h would be pretty good.

Thanks


1. i5-3570K. The new Intel Haswell CPUs will be out shortly so that could change with the 4570K.

2. No, games are far more GPU intensive than CPU intensive.

3. You're probably looking at something like this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You don't need tons of watts because today's GPUs are getting far more energy efficient than ever.

4. It really isn't. Graphically intensive games rely far more on the GPU than any other component, and won't use more than 8GB. If you want to play strategy games they might use more memory but it's not really worth it.

I'd suggest not buying a 3D display but instead investing in a nice 1440P IPS panel.

Here's what I would suggest for a build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($63.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Case: Silverstone SST-RV03B-WA ATX Full Tower Case ($175.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($113.03 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1934.76
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 22:43 EDT-0400)

That gives you the rest of your budget to add whatever monitor(s), OS license, a nice set of speakers (don't buy Logitech tin cans), and whatever keyboard and mouse you want.

Quote:
Great list! Thanks. I think I'll be going with Nvidia though


The motherboard on the previous build is an expensive, overrated gimmick, junk cooler, and a processor that's not really used for
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May 12, 2013 7:48:38 PM

Also, there will be little to no overclocking on the CPU, so is liquid cooling necessary?
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May 12, 2013 7:50:15 PM

Jack Revenant said:


That site has really sub-par builds. It can be a decent reference, in a pinch, but it is not a substitute for actual advice.

Now then, here is a build he could use:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($316.16 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X60 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($117.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Phantom 820 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($199.75 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1050W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($186.08 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VG278H 120Hz 27.0" Monitor ($531.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $2996.30
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 22:24 EDT-0400)

Mind you, you can cut the price quite a bit and still get nearly-equal performance, but that meets the budget and is extremely powerful. If you want, I can post a more stripped-down version with more price-efficient component choices.


Great build. But if he only wants it for gaming, than the i7 3770K is just a waste. You could replace it with an i5 3570K and use the money elsewhere. How did you set up your links like that? It is awesome :) 
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May 12, 2013 7:51:58 PM

1. Z77 are like mainstream motherboards while X79 are for business or work.

2. 4th Gen Intel CPU are going to be release soon so I recommend waiting a month or two.

But...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H110 94.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($127.13 @ TigerDirect)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($197.94 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($184.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($269.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($142.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card ($999.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Wireless Network Adapter: Asus PCE-N15 802.11b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($26.97 @ Outlet PC)
Case: Corsair 650D ATX Mid Tower Case ($173.75 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 1050W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.22 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VG248QE 144Hz 24.0" Monitor ($269.99 @ Newegg)
Other: NVIDIA 3D Vision 2 Wireless Glasses Kit ($129.99)
Total: $2969.93
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 23:26 EDT-0400)


Also this, but no monitor or Nvidia glasses which are about $400. It has 2x GTX 690s though. =/
I should mention it's a tight fit for the H100i going with the 300r case.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i 77.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($197.94 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Dominator Platinum 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($184.99 @ Best Buy)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($67.19 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($999.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($999.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Wireless Network Adapter: Asus PCE-N15 802.11b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($26.97 @ Outlet PC)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ Microcenter)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 1050W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.22 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $3088.25
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 23:33 EDT-0400)
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May 12, 2013 7:56:07 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Shrewsie_B said:
A buddy of mine wants me to build him a gaming rig (monitor included) for $3000. I have, somewhat, of a list together, but I wanted suggestions particularly on processors, Z77 vs X79 mobos, psu, and memory. Like;

-which processor is best for gaming now, and possibly the next few years with the next gen coming out?

-is an X79 mobo worth the added $$?

-what psu is good for SLI (or high-end GPUs)?

-when is more RAM (16Gb vs 8Gb) helpful?

If anyone wants to suggest an entire build, that would help a bunch. I'm pretty new to the PC scene myself and this is only the second build I've done.

Also, he loves 3D, so I thought an ASUS vg278h would be pretty good.

Thanks


1. i5-3570K. The new Intel Haswell CPUs will be out shortly so that could change with the 4570K.

2. No, games are far more GPU intensive than CPU intensive.

3. You're probably looking at something like this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

You don't need tons of watts because today's GPUs are getting far more energy efficient than ever.

4. It really isn't. Graphically intensive games rely far more on the GPU than any other component, and won't use more than 8GB. If you want to play strategy games they might use more memory but it's not really worth it.

I'd suggest not buying a 3D display but instead investing in a nice 1440P IPS panel.

Here's what I would suggest for a build:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Mushkin Blackline 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($63.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vector Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Case: Silverstone SST-RV03B-WA ATX Full Tower Case ($175.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($113.03 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1934.76
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 22:43 EDT-0400)

That gives you the rest of your budget to add whatever monitor(s), OS license, a nice set of speakers (don't buy Logitech tin cans), and whatever keyboard and mouse you want.

Quote:
Great list! Thanks. I think I'll be going with Nvidia though


The motherboard on the previous build is an expensive, overrated gimmick, junk cooler, and a processor that's not really used for


Impeccable build as always, g-unit. I humbly disagree regarding the Kraken: it has quite impressive cooling specs, though with the revelation that OP does not intend to overclock heavily, it would be of no use. The Sabertooth I included for its warranty, which utterly crushes the more efficient ASRock Extreme6. I also factored his extremely high price range. Twere I going for efficiency, I would have used a Noctua DH14 and an Extreme6.

ECaarnage said:
Jack Revenant said:


That site has really sub-par builds. It can be a decent reference, in a pinch, but it is not a substitute for actual advice.

Now then, here is a build he could use:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($316.16 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X60 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($117.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Phantom 820 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($199.75 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1050W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($186.08 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VG278H 120Hz 27.0" Monitor ($531.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $2996.30
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 22:24 EDT-0400)

Mind you, you can cut the price quite a bit and still get nearly-equal performance, but that meets the budget and is extremely powerful. If you want, I can post a more stripped-down version with more price-efficient component choices.


Great build. But if he only wants it for gaming, than the i7 3770K is just a waste. You could replace it with an i5 3570K to use on something else. How did you set up your links like that? It is awesome :) 


The i7-3770k isn't an efficient option, but nothing there was. It was overkill options which still fit within price range. I knew I could rely on someone (and am quite happy it was g-unit) to offer a price-efficient build, so I decided to offer a max-price build.
If you select the BBCode option on PC Part Picker, you get a block of copy what can be copy-pasted for that effect.
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May 12, 2013 8:06:15 PM

Shrewsie_B said:

Great list! Thanks. I think I'll be going with Nvidia though


You could replace them with GTX 670s (the efficient options) or GTX 680s (the overpriced but moderately more powerful option). You might also consider waiting for the 700 series.
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May 12, 2013 8:24:29 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($209.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Phanteks PH-TC14PE_BK 78.1 CFM CPU Cooler ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: MSI Z77A-GD65 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($149.99 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($107.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($125.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($445.91 @ Newegg)
Sound Card: Asus Xonar Essence STX 24-bit 192 KHz Sound Card ($187.98 @ Amazon)
Wireless Network Adapter: TP-Link TL-WDN4800 802.11a/b/g/n PCI-Express x1 Wi-Fi Adapter ($32.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Corsair C70 Military Green (Green) ATX Mid Tower Case ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic M12II 850W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($113.03 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($94.35 @ Amazon)
Monitor: Asus VG23AH 23.0" Monitor ($197.58 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VG23AH 23.0" Monitor ($197.58 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder Wired Laser Mouse ($59.99 @ NCIX US)
Speakers: Audioengine A2 (Black) 30W 2ch Speakers ($199.00 @ Amazon)
Total: $2462.32
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Left room for CrossFire or buy more monitors for better multi-tasking.
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May 12, 2013 8:27:43 PM

ECaarnage said:
Jack Revenant said:


That site has really sub-par builds. It can be a decent reference, in a pinch, but it is not a substitute for actual advice.

Now then, here is a build he could use:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($316.16 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: NZXT Kraken X60 98.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($117.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH Z77 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($239.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($214.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card (2-Way CrossFire) ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
Case: NZXT Phantom 820 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($199.75 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 1050W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($186.08 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.94 @ Outlet PC)
Monitor: Asus VG278H 120Hz 27.0" Monitor ($531.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $2996.30
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-12 22:24 EDT-0400)

Mind you, you can cut the price quite a bit and still get nearly-equal performance, but that meets the budget and is extremely powerful. If you want, I can post a more stripped-down version with more price-efficient component choices.


Great build. But if he only wants it for gaming, than the i7 3770K is just a waste. You could replace it with an i5 3570K and use the money elsewhere. How did you set up your links like that? It is awesome :) 


On PCPartPicker, choose the BBCode Markup.
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May 12, 2013 8:31:52 PM

Shrewsie_B said:
Also, there will be little to no overclocking on the CPU, so is liquid cooling necessary?


If you're going to be paying this kind of cash for a build, you should definitely be prepared to overclock. If you get a motherboard with a modern visual BIOS then it makes it really easy to do so. If you don't want to overclock then get an i5-3470 or an i5-3350P. Liquid cooling definitely isn't necessary if you're not doing a strong overclock, and I really dislike plastic waterblocks when the Noctua D14 beats them all and runs on air.
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May 12, 2013 8:55:03 PM

For the CPU I would go with a i5 3570K it is still the best option for a gaming rig. 8gig is still all that is really needed for gaming I only went with 16gig in my gaming rig because it was on sale for the same price as 8gig kits at the time.
For the GPU's if you are going to do Crossfire/SLI I would look at the Sapphire HD 7950 for AMD or Gigabyte GTX 670's for Nvidia. From what I have seen the GTX 680 is just not worth the price over the GTX 670.
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