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How to use roku without hdmi port on TV

Last response: in Other Consumer Electronics
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May 13, 2013 6:46:03 AM

I just bought a second roku (roku 3) and was excited to put it to use. But the (hand-me-down) TV I have must be a first gen. Samsung hdtv (I can get the model and specs later if need-be) and there is no HDMI input! There are component video inputs, the other standard jacks, and what I think is an dvi or vga or avi?? input. I think there is an optical jack (I have to check tonight and can update, but it may have been an output). Either way, I understand that dvi is just video. I can't seem to find anywhere an hdmi cable that splits to dvi and male audio cables.

My questions are: What are my options and what is the best way to bring audio and video to the TV? Is it true that ANY of the audio would have to be converted to analog? What happens to the hd quality at this point? Will I ultimately have to go with an older model roku with component ports?

Thank you all, in advance!

More about : roku hdmi port

May 13, 2013 7:27:32 AM

so u need to just go on amazon or some other website
and get an HDMI to component cable

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May 13, 2013 7:59:23 AM

mobrocket said:
so u need to just go on amazon or some other website
and get an HDMI to component cable



I don't think this is right. I don't think they make such a cable that works digital to analog like that.
Or all the reviews say they don't work right.
There are cables that seem like that for PS3 but I don't have one of those and I think there might be a special set-up for them.
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May 15, 2013 9:37:00 AM

Okay, I've done lots of research and this is what I found. ALMOST EVERY converter box, including the one listed above is not HDCP compliant. What this means is that some HD content will be blocked. That kind of ruins some of the best parts of streaming. There is one product that seems to be of quality and good review, the HD Fury, but it is so expensive that you might as well buy a new TV, seriously. By the way, read reviews and watch out for knock-offs of that product.

Any cable that attempts to go from HDMI to something other than DVI is a waste. Like composite, component, etc. They won't work. DVI would work, but it is video only!

The best solution seems to be to go with a Roku 2 model or lower that has different outputs. Roku 2 has an A/V port (which the Roku 3 does NOT have) with which you can connect to composite RCA jacks (NOT Component). But beware of this. As far as I can tell, you can NOT use a STANDARD 3.5mm to Red, White, Yellow RCA cord. Many people have complained of this (and I have a great quality one right now at home MYSELF, that does NOT work). Apparently the 3.5mm plug is PROPRIETARY and I have ordered one from Roku and will update on this. Their website says they are proprietary but that did not stop me from trying like everyone else.

Quality will automatically be diminished by not using the HDMI cable, but the first generation HDTVs screwed up or were at least too late jumping on the HDMI boat.

Perhaps you should go with the cheaper Roku HD or Roku LT if your TV is so old that you don't have HD quality anyway. There is no reason to upgrade the Roku then just downgrade what it can do, just so that you can hook it up to your TV, unless you are planning on buying a better TV in the future.

Another option is to hunt down a Roku XDS. This DOES have a port that can split to COMPONENT video output (Red, Green, Blue). As far as I can tell is that Roku doesn't even make this one any more (they don't sell it on their own site). I assume the software will not update much for it. And as far as the cables, I'd buy them direct from Roku. They DO sell them (at a decent price) right on their site.

What I did was take the first unit I had, the Roku 2HD and used that in my basement with my older TV (mostly for kids and treadmill use), and installed the new Roku 3 on my main TV. I was hoping to utilize the headphones in the remote function on the treadmill, but oh well. The biggest loss is the picture quality. But the kids won't care anyway. As it stands, even the 2HD is not working. Hopefully the cord from Roku themselves will do the trick.

I hope my many hours of looking (grief) helps some of you.
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September 13, 2013 8:57:11 AM

After reading this I think I'm getting somwhere, finally. I have an HD tv with DVI. If I buy the roku 2 can I can I get the video by converting the hdmi to dvi and get the audio by connecting a cable from the av port on the box to audio input on the tv?


]Okay, I've done lots of research and this is what I found. ALMOST EVERY converter box, including the one listed above is not HDCP compliant. What this means is that some HD content will be blocked. That kind of ruins some of the best parts of streaming. There is one product that seems to be of quality and good review, the HD Fury, but it is so expensive that you might as well buy a new TV, seriously. By the way, read reviews and watch out for knock-offs of that product.

Any cable that attempts to go from HDMI to something other than DVI is a waste. Like composite, component, etc. They won't work. DVI would work, but it is video only!

The best solution seems to be to go with a Roku 2 model or lower that has different outputs. Roku 2 has an A/V port (which the Roku 3 does NOT have) with which you can connect to composite RCA jacks (NOT Component). But beware of this. As far as I can tell, you can NOT use a STANDARD 3.5mm to Red, White, Yellow RCA cord. Many people have complained of this (and I have a great quality one right now at home MYSELF, that does NOT work). Apparently the 3.5mm plug is PROPRIETARY and I have ordered one from Roku and will update on this. Their website says they are proprietary but that did not stop me from trying like everyone else.

Quality will automatically be diminished by not using the HDMI cable, but the first generation HDTVs screwed up or were at least too late jumping on the HDMI boat.

Perhaps you should go with the cheaper Roku HD or Roku LT if your TV is so old that you don't have HD quality anyway. There is no reason to upgrade the Roku then just downgrade what it can do, just so that you can hook it up to your TV, unless you are planning on buying a better TV in the future.

Another option is to hunt down a Roku XDS. This DOES have a port that can split to COMPONENT video output (Red, Green, Blue). As far as I can tell is that Roku doesn't even make this one any more (they don't sell it on their own site). I assume the software will not update much for it. And as far as the cables, I'd buy them direct from Roku. They DO sell them (at a decent price) right on their site.

What I did was take the first unit I had, the Roku 2HD and used that in my basement with my older TV (mostly for kids and treadmill use), and installed the new Roku 3 on my main TV. I was hoping to utilize the headphones in the remote function on the treadmill, but oh well. The biggest loss is the picture quality. But the kids won't care anyway. As it stands, even the 2HD is not working. Hopefully the cord from Roku themselves will do the trick.

I hope my many hours of looking (grief) helps some of you.[/quotemsg]

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November 18, 2013 11:05:32 AM

11531176,0,1415219 said:
After reading this I think I'm getting somwhere, finally. I have an HD tv with DVI. If I buy the roku 2 can I can I get the video by converting the hdmi to dvi and get the audio by connecting a cable from the av port on the box to audio input on the tv?

I have the same situation with my older Panasonic Tau HDTV that has only a DVI-HDCP input (as well as components and composites). I just had an online chat today with roku. I was told that you can use the yellow, white and red for your audio and video OR the HDMI (provided your TV has HDMI). But you can't use the HDMI to DVI (with an adapter of course) for video AND red and white for audio at the same time. The roku won't "split" them. It's one or the other. That's what I was told. For some reason I don't buy it but I'm merely telling you what I was told.

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December 24, 2013 10:59:23 AM

What about ATV Pro? Kannex says it is Roku compatible: "ATV PRO is an HDMI to VGA adapter. It’ll connect any of the new Roku media players via HDMI to a TV or monitor that has VGA. You can also connect external speakers to get high quality audio. There is no external power adapters needed to power the ATV PRO for it is bus powered, giving you more flexibility to connect in your entertainment center. Once connected, you can use Roku as it was intended– to give you all that great Internet video and music content from over the Internet. Do know that you do need a wired or wireless network at home to enable the streaming of the content over the internet."
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March 31, 2014 4:20:39 PM

>> I don't think they make such a cable that works digital to analog like that.
-- They do but are not possible to find. You need to contact this person in order to get an HDMI to RCA-jack cable that will connect the Roku to your cathode ray tube (CRT) TV. JohnPC Configurations, Inc., Website: www.JohnPC.net, Ph #: (425) 374-4888, They're based out of WA state.

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April 21, 2014 8:50:39 PM

I connected my roku 3 to tv with the help of a dvi to Hdmi adapter. Picture came though but no sound. Short term fix is you can still get the audio through the remote with this installation. So either headphones for a basement treadmill setup...or run 3.5 output to red/white plugs to your stereo. Ackward but it works for a basement.

My long term fix was to buy a hdmi to component cable. But when I tried to hook that up, no sound or picture came through. Not sure if it was a bad cord or if that method wont work without a $30 adapter.
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April 21, 2014 10:07:17 PM

DVI is a digital video interface bus. It transmitts video only.
VGA is analog video bus. Only video signal.
HDMI is a high-speed digital audio-video bus. You can split it to DVI video signal for example, but you can't split the audio, because it's digital too and all the TV audio inputs are analog.
Seems that the roku disables it's analog audio outputs when the HDMI is used, so you can't use them together. That means you can convert the HDMI video to DVI, but you can't do anything with the sound.
I recommend not to use a high-definition digital interfaces (of any kind) together with such analog or split the digital to analog. The charm and quality of the HD buses comes from the digital signal that is passing thru them. Any conversions of the digital signal means lower quality, attenuation and parasite components inserting (especially with a low cost cable).
It's really difficult here. All the solutions up to here make compromises with the quality and some don't even work. There's no sense of using HD interface outputs with low-end conversions and interfaces. HD picture and sound means that you just have to use the proper bus to have them. And that's just the HDMI, nothing else . . .

There are two solutions for me:

1) Another TV with HDMI;
2) Another player with interface that's capable with the current TV;

The problem comes mainly from the fact, that both devices are different generations reperesentatives.
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