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a7s8x mx motherboard does not detect IDE harddrives or Disk Drive

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May 14, 2013 3:33:55 AM

I'm experiencing the strangest issue. Basically, I was performing some XP updates on a computer with an a7s8x mx motherboard. When they were done, I shut down the computer. The next morning, I tried switching the computer and I got the error message: "disk boot failure insert system disk and press enter."

I went into the bios, and it was simply not detecting both the DVD drive and the hard drive, so I decided to use a different IDE cable awith no avail.

So I tested that hard drive on a different computer and it turned on fine. I changed the CMOS battery on the motherboard and that did not solve the issue. So I'm stuck.

I am down to there being two issues, perhaps the IDE connections on the motherboard (maybe the port or even the whole circuit) is not working, or the PSU is not working. However, could that be the case even if the hard drive is spinning when the computer turns on and the computer POSTS.

Honestly, I am completely lost and any help would be much appreciated!
a c 108 V Motherboard
May 14, 2013 5:51:57 PM

If the HDD is spinning, clearly the power is getting to it. When you tested the HDD in another computer, were you able to load Windows? If not, how do you know "it turned on fine"?

After the boot failure message, did you apply default settings to the BIOS?

You could potentially have two separate issues that presented themselves in close succession. The first problem could have been a virus, or some other form of malware. The second could be the BIOS was changed to SATA mode when/if default settings were applied.

If this is the case, setting the the BIOS to legacy IDE mode would allow your IDE drives to have read/write capablity.

On the other hand, if this is not the case, your mobo could be bad.
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May 15, 2013 3:29:43 AM

So when I plugged the hard drive into another computer, I was able to open and explore the drive using Windows Explorer. I did not boot from the hard drive so I assume the hard drive is not broken.

Although, I'm not 100% sure if the data on the hard drive hasn't been infected by a virus, if it was I would have assumed, from past experience, that I would get a message that the boot on the hard drive was corrupt. In this instance the hard drive is simply missing from the BIOS.

To give a better picture, the BIOS does not seem to have an "IDE" mode or a "SATA" mode, instead the BIOS displays 6 drive options: Primary Master, Primary Slave, Secondary Master, Secondary Slave, SATA 1 and SATA 2. Each of those drives are turned to "Auto" detect, and each display the fact "None" drives are connected. There is a hard drive connected via IDE to the Primary port and a DVD drive connected via IDE on the Secondary port. The BIOS detect neither of them.

As per the motherboard being bad, it detects the one stick of RAM installed and the floppy drive installed. Furthermore the keyboard works...what are the chances that the motherboard's IDE ports are broken (all pins are intact), furthermore if it is not the port, could the IDE motherboard circuits be broken. (I read that this is very rare).

Is there anything else you can think of I have forgotten to check?
if the motherboard had certain power connections disconnected, would it even POST? As it looks like all power connections are connected to the board and the fact that the computer POSTs I assume would back that up.

PS thank you for the advice.


T_T said:
If the HDD is spinning, clearly the power is getting to it. When you tested the HDD in another computer, were you able to load Windows? If not, how do you know "it turned on fine"?

After the boot failure message, did you apply default settings to the BIOS?

You could potentially have two separate issues that presented themselves in close succession. The first problem could have been a virus, or some other form of malware. The second could be the BIOS was changed to SATA mode when/if default settings were applied.

If this is the case, setting the the BIOS to legacy IDE mode would allow your IDE drives to have read/write capablity.

On the other hand, if this is not the case, your mobo could be bad.


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a c 108 V Motherboard
May 15, 2013 10:07:04 AM

Exploring the contents of the drive in question proves that the HDD is good; however, you're not testing the boot sector or the OS startup files. Considering that the BIOS doesn't detect the HDD, though, would suggest that the mobo has gone bad. Indeed, IDE circuit failure is rare, as is any other individual circuit.

If you really need this drive to operate as the boot device, you could install an adapter and use this HDD on a SATA (I, II, or III) board. Here is an example.
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