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Do i need to buy any extra cables or anything like that for a new build?

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May 14, 2013 8:35:04 PM

Hey all,
Going to be building my first computer pretty soon and I was wondering if aside from the core components if there's anything else I'm going to need to buy or if all cables and stuff will be included. The case I'm going to be using comes with 7 fans and I'm wondering if I need additional cables to support that? Thanks!

Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

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May 14, 2013 9:21:55 PM

Briefly, to answer your question:
Fans come with cables attached to them so there is no need to buy fan cables. You may opt for extensions if your cable routing requires it, or in line resistors to keep them quiet, or adapters if you need to power them from a PSU rather than a fan controller, but those are very specific to your build.
Typically all of the 'required' cables and adapters needed to make the system turn on and work come with the parts you purchase. The PSU typically comes with a power chord. Motherbaords typically come with SATA cables and a few adapters. And outside of data and power there really are not a whole lot of other cables required to make the thing simply turn on internally. There are rare exceptions to this, such as a certain 'green' series of PSUs that did not come with power cables, or if you are purchasing extra HDDs then you will need to pick up some extra SATA cables, but it is not normally a problem.

Outside of the computer you may need things like an optical cable to go from the PC to an amp, or a headphone adapter, or longer video cables, etc. But those are typically extras that you can pick up after things are at least up and running.
My computer has quite the cable routing job, which required several little extensions, cable wrap, and other odds and ends that I have picked up over the years... while I enjoy having a finished product now, none of it was required to purchase to get it up and running, and most of it I would not have been able to pick out until after doing the initial build anyways.
Also, for external cables, my computer has made a slow movement away from where I sit. First it sat behind my monitor, then it moved to the floor beside my 'desk' (coffee table), then it moved ~8' from my area, and most recently it moved into my server rack some 20' away. With each move I have had to buy longer and longer video, audio, and USB cables to make things work... but again, all of the hardware purchased came with what was needed to get things up and running on day 1 when it sat right on the table.


Now for a few other notes:
Why on earth do you need 7 fans? My own system has 9 fans... but that is a pretty rare thing, and that includes the CPU, GPU, and PSU fans. A typical game rig needs 5 fans total, and that is MORE than adequate for a standard game rig with some OCing:
1 CPU (aftermarket if OCing)
1 GPU
1 PSU (no fan on high quality 500W PSUs is now becoming standard)
2 Case fans (one intake, one outlet)

Anything more than that is typically just for show. For my own system everything runs at 6-800RPM to keep the rig very quiet, and so I needed extra fans to guarantee proper cooling at such low fan speeds. Here is my setup:
2x120mm CPU (push/pull on a Hyper212 Evo)
2x96mm GPU (open cooler, so heat is not exhausted out the back of the case)
1x120mm PSU
4 Case (2x140mm on top for exhaust, 1x120mm front intake, 1x140mm bottom intake

If I ran at normal fan speeds I could easily run on 6 fans even after OCing. Normal (sane) people who are not nearly as picky about noise really do not need, and probably should not have, so many fans, and whenever I upgrade my GPU to a next gen chip then I will probably remove a few fans as there will be considerably less heat in the system.

Don't throw money at that case. If you need a decent starter case then go with something like this: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Down the road when you can save some money then get a nice big flashy case with high quality fans and other nice features. Cases pretty much never break, so when you are starting out then get a basic case with good cooling potential for dirt cheap. Then, 6-12mo down the road save up for the case that you really want and drop good money into it because a good case will outlive you. I still have my first case that I purchased back in '96 and it still works perfectly fine. My main rig now lives in a CM690, but that old beige box has been used for 3 main builds, 2 home servers, and countless test and troubbleshooting builds over the years. Cases never die, so either get the nice premium case you really really want right away, or else get a dirt cheap case that just works so that you can spend money on your initial hardware and then upgrade later.
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May 14, 2013 10:27:56 PM

Okay cool, thanks for the info. I'm actually getting the case from a friend who moved his build to a different one so its not actually costing me anything. I know its kinda overkill to have so many fans but I just wanted to make sure I'd have a place to plug them all in. And I would have definitely gone with a cheaper case if I wasn't getting this one free. Thanks again for all the info and fast response :D 
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May 17, 2013 4:13:53 AM

Free is an excellent price for that case lol.

Hope your build goes well!
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