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USB ports die as soon as I plug somethig in

Last response: in Motherboards
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May 15, 2013 5:24:38 AM

I thought I had my model number but left it at home. I think its GA-P55-UD5. There might be another letter after the P55. I know its the 1156 socket.

Anyway I have always had issues with the usb ports. When I plug something it may or may not be recognized by the computer and it may or may nit kill that usb slot until after reboot. I have always just moved the item to another usb and not thought about it. Now I have my computer in the basement and run 4x25' usb extenders to a panel to plug in my usb equipment.

I can move the 4 extenders all over the back of the motherboard to different usb ports. From up stairs I can always get my keyboard and mouse to work but getting external hard drive, iphone, camera memory card to work is a crap shoot.

Is there a driver I need to update or a known issue?

Thanks
Dan
May 15, 2013 5:40:50 AM

Are you using the ports on the back of the board, or on the case via the usb header?
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a c 471 V Motherboard
May 15, 2013 5:55:08 AM

It may be a bios issue. Have you check to see if your mb bios it u to date.
With a long run like the one you have there may be signal or voltage drop. You may need a powered hub on the end.
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May 15, 2013 6:15:15 AM

Rosco100 said:
Are you using the ports on the back of the board, or on the case via the usb header?


Off the back of the MB.
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May 15, 2013 6:16:34 AM

smorizio said:
It may be a bios issue. Have you check to see if your mb bios it u to date.
With a long run like the one you have there may be signal or voltage drop. You may need a powered hub on the end.


Just updated the bios last night to F11. Have not had a chance to put it through its paces. Will do tonight. Was just hoping to catch the, obvious before I have to start posting at extreme detail.
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a c 308 V Motherboard
May 15, 2013 7:11:33 AM

USB cable has a normal maximum length of about 5 meters (16.4 feet), but you can get longer distances by using an active USB extension/repeater cable.
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May 15, 2013 7:49:28 AM

Calvin7 said:
USB cable has a normal maximum length of about 5 meters (16.4 feet), but you can get longer distances by using an active USB extension/repeater cable.



You know I say 25 feet. But when I bought all the extension wires I did a fair amount of research on Monoprice. I bought the longest one they recommended that would work without being an active cable.

Sounds like I need to go home measure my cables. See if the bios update made a difference. I went into the device manager and told it to get the latest drivers for one of the ports. It came back as already having the latest version.

About to open a question about SATA II and upgrading the motherboard to make it work.

Thanks all for your input and feedback. It has been helpful!
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a b V Motherboard
May 15, 2013 10:15:08 AM

Bluetobb said:
Traciatim said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus#Cabli...

USB 1.1: 3-5 Meters
USB 2.0: 5 Meters
USB 3.0: 3 Meters

You're trying to run high powered devices out of spec.



That is interesting. Is reading an SD card high powered?


I'm not certain on that one, but I would consider anything that needs high speed communication and data throughput would be far more sensitive to cable length. A good way to test this though... plug the devices in using short cables... and do they work?

Considering just calculating voltage drop over 6' cables vs 30' 26AWG wires at 5V and 250mA you end up with either a 2.2% drop or a 12% drop. If the device needs 500mA instead the voltage drop on 30' cables the voltage drop is 24% instead.

To combat that you either need shorter wires, thicker wires, or some type of active boost in the middle.
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May 15, 2013 1:14:20 PM

Traciatim said:
Bluetobb said:
Traciatim said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Serial_Bus#Cabli...

USB 1.1: 3-5 Meters
USB 2.0: 5 Meters
USB 3.0: 3 Meters

You're trying to run high powered devices out of spec.



That is interesting. Is reading an SD card high powered?


I'm not certain on that one, but I would consider anything that needs high speed communication and data throughput would be far more sensitive to cable length. A good way to test this though... plug the devices in using short cables... and do they work?

Considering just calculating voltage drop over 6' cables vs 30' 26AWG wires at 5V and 250mA you end up with either a 2.2% drop or a 12% drop. If the device needs 500mA instead the voltage drop on 30' cables the voltage drop is 24% instead.

To combat that you either need shorter wires, thicker wires, or some type of active boost in the middle.


Thanks for the feedback I will also add this to my testing tonight.
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