Solved

First PC Build. Looking For Advice

Hi everyone,

I am undertaking my first ever PC build. I want to build a decent gaming rig, with plenty of room for future upgrades, in time for Total War: Rome II's release. And I want it to look GOOD. I have never built a PC before (though I have upgraded a few parts here and there on my current PC) so I am asking the community here for any input/advice/suggestions. My budget is approx. $1,500.

Here is what I have so far for my build:
http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Edwad_/saved/1BnR

I already have a mouse/keyboard, monitor, and speakers that work great for me.

As you can see I have room in my budget to make some hardware changes/upgrades. Any suggestions as to what hardware I should put more money into and general advice for my first build is much appreciated.

Thanks!
20 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about build advice
  1. I would change the case for one of the 2 below:

    Fractal Design Define R4 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811352021

    COOLER MASTER HAF 922 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119197

    Also the graphic card as you have the budget for it -- get at least a GTX 660 Ti 2GB, or an Radeon HD 7870.

    GIGABYTE GV-N66TOC-2GD GeForce GTX 660 Ti 2GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125440&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-_-na-_-na-_-na&cm_sp=&AID=10446076&PID=3938566&SID=

    ASUS HD7870-DC2-2GD5-V2 Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB 256-bit http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121649
  2. Best answer
    At that budget, this would be my pitch:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

    CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($209.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($24.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 840 Pro Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($125.99 @ NCIX US)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($67.19 @ Outlet PC)
    Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($433.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (Black/Orange) ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($65.98 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
    Total: $1308.05
    (Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
    (Generated by PCPartPicker 2013-05-15 21:07 EDT-0400)

    Note: The Z77 mobo and Ivy Bridge processor are stand-ins for equivalently-priced Haswell processor and compatible mobo.
    You could probably squeeze in a CrossFire if you upped your budget range a bit, but I don't think you'll need it.
  3. Try this build instead. http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Xzkx

    I changed the CPU, added a cooler, changed the memory to better timing, added an SSD, changed the video card, and finally changed the power supply.

    Corrected
  4. jnkweaver said:
    Try this build instead. http://pcpartpicker.com/p/XymZ

    I changed the CPU, added a cooler, changed the memory to better timing, added an SSD, changed the video card, and finally changed the power supply.


    Out of curiosity, why go for such an expensive mobo, then drop to 1066mhz RAM to save $10?

    Edit: This is not meant as an insult. I am legitimately curious.
  5. That is what we call a mistake. Thanks for pointing it out. BTW I didn't choose the mb the original poster did so I just left it alone since it came under budget.

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Xzkx
  6. jnkweaver said:
    That is what we call a mistake. Thanks for pointing it out. BTW I didn't choose the mb the original poster did so I just left it alone since it came under budget.

    http://pcpartpicker.com/p/Xzkx


    Ah. That makes me feel a lot better, actually. I was thinking "Oh god, what does jnkweaver know that I don't? Have I been recommending bad RAM?". Regarding the mobo, didn't notice that. Makes sense now.
  7. Thank you all for your input I will definitely have to rethink the components I use in my machine. I will probably end up making a mix of all of your suggestions and whatever other advice I get in the near future before I make my final decision on what pieces to buy.

    I have a question though, it seems that everyone on this thread has suggested I change my cpu choice to an i5. I am curious why that is? Are i7's just not enough of an upgrade from the i5 to justify the higher price tag?

    Again thank you all for your time and advice.

    Edit:
    Also, is 8GB RAM plenty or should I consider 12 or 16gb? RAM seems to be MUCH cheaper than the last time I upgraded my current PC.
  8. Eddie87 said:
    Thank you all for your input I will definitely have to rethink the components I use in my machine. I will probably end up making a mix of all of your suggestions and whatever other advice I get in the near future before I make my final decision on what pieces to buy.

    I have a question though, it seems that everyone on this thread has suggested I change my cpu choice to an i5. I am curious why that is? Are i7's just not enough of an upgrade from the i5 to justify the higher price tag?

    Again thank you all for your time and advice.

    Edit:
    Also, is 8GB RAM plenty or should I consider 12 or 16gb? RAM seems to be MUCH cheaper than the last time I upgraded my current PC.


    The i3-3770k is almost literally not an upgrade from the i5-3570k. It runs 100mhz faster, and has something called "Hyperthreading". Other than that, no benefit. Since Hyperthreading doesn't benefit 99% of games, almost nobody ever advocates adding a 3770k to a gaming computer.

    8GB of RAM is all you will need. You don't lose anything by upping the amount (other than money, of course), but you gain essentially nothing in contemporary games.

    I'm glad we were able to help. :)
  9. Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Thank you all for your input I will definitely have to rethink the components I use in my machine. I will probably end up making a mix of all of your suggestions and whatever other advice I get in the near future before I make my final decision on what pieces to buy.

    I have a question though, it seems that everyone on this thread has suggested I change my cpu choice to an i5. I am curious why that is? Are i7's just not enough of an upgrade from the i5 to justify the higher price tag?

    Again thank you all for your time and advice.

    Edit:
    Also, is 8GB RAM plenty or should I consider 12 or 16gb? RAM seems to be MUCH cheaper than the last time I upgraded my current PC.


    The i3-3770k is almost literally not an upgrade from the i5-3570k. It runs 100mhz faster, and has something called "Hyperthreading". Other than that, no benefit. Since Hyperthreading doesn't benefit 99% of games, almost nobody ever advocates adding a 3770k to a gaming computer.

    8GB of RAM is all you will need. You don't lose anything by upping the amount (other than money, of course), but you gain essentially nothing in contemporary games.

    I'm glad we were able to help. :)



    Thanks for the quick reply on my cpu and ram questions. You all have been a great help. I think I have my final build here: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Edwad_/saved/1Bty
  10. Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Thank you all for your input I will definitely have to rethink the components I use in my machine. I will probably end up making a mix of all of your suggestions and whatever other advice I get in the near future before I make my final decision on what pieces to buy.

    I have a question though, it seems that everyone on this thread has suggested I change my cpu choice to an i5. I am curious why that is? Are i7's just not enough of an upgrade from the i5 to justify the higher price tag?

    Again thank you all for your time and advice.

    Edit:
    Also, is 8GB RAM plenty or should I consider 12 or 16gb? RAM seems to be MUCH cheaper than the last time I upgraded my current PC.


    The i3-3770k is almost literally not an upgrade from the i5-3570k. It runs 100mhz faster, and has something called "Hyperthreading". Other than that, no benefit. Since Hyperthreading doesn't benefit 99% of games, almost nobody ever advocates adding a 3770k to a gaming computer.

    8GB of RAM is all you will need. You don't lose anything by upping the amount (other than money, of course), but you gain essentially nothing in contemporary games.

    I'm glad we were able to help. :)



    Thanks for the quick reply on my cpu and ram questions. You all have been a great help. I think I have my final build here: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Edwad_/saved/1Bty


    My pleasure.

    The RAM you have there is too tall. With an air cooler, you want low profile RAM.
    Also, your PSU is quite large. Are you intending to add another card later?
  11. Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Thank you all for your input I will definitely have to rethink the components I use in my machine. I will probably end up making a mix of all of your suggestions and whatever other advice I get in the near future before I make my final decision on what pieces to buy.

    I have a question though, it seems that everyone on this thread has suggested I change my cpu choice to an i5. I am curious why that is? Are i7's just not enough of an upgrade from the i5 to justify the higher price tag?

    Again thank you all for your time and advice.

    Edit:
    Also, is 8GB RAM plenty or should I consider 12 or 16gb? RAM seems to be MUCH cheaper than the last time I upgraded my current PC.


    The i3-3770k is almost literally not an upgrade from the i5-3570k. It runs 100mhz faster, and has something called "Hyperthreading". Other than that, no benefit. Since Hyperthreading doesn't benefit 99% of games, almost nobody ever advocates adding a 3770k to a gaming computer.

    8GB of RAM is all you will need. You don't lose anything by upping the amount (other than money, of course), but you gain essentially nothing in contemporary games.

    I'm glad we were able to help. :)



    Thanks for the quick reply on my cpu and ram questions. You all have been a great help. I think I have my final build here: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Edwad_/saved/1Bty


    My pleasure.

    The RAM you have there is too tall. With an air cooler, you want low profile RAM.
    Also, your PSU is quite large. Are you intending to add another card later?


    Ah that's why you suggested the Corsair Vengeance. I hadn't noticed that detail. thanks for pointing that out.

    I assume you mean a video card? Yes, I do intend on adding another one later. Are there also low-profile psu's I should be looking at as well? Thanks for bringing these things up. saving me some frustration in the future.
  12. Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Thank you all for your input I will definitely have to rethink the components I use in my machine. I will probably end up making a mix of all of your suggestions and whatever other advice I get in the near future before I make my final decision on what pieces to buy.

    I have a question though, it seems that everyone on this thread has suggested I change my cpu choice to an i5. I am curious why that is? Are i7's just not enough of an upgrade from the i5 to justify the higher price tag?

    Again thank you all for your time and advice.

    Edit:
    Also, is 8GB RAM plenty or should I consider 12 or 16gb? RAM seems to be MUCH cheaper than the last time I upgraded my current PC.


    The i3-3770k is almost literally not an upgrade from the i5-3570k. It runs 100mhz faster, and has something called "Hyperthreading". Other than that, no benefit. Since Hyperthreading doesn't benefit 99% of games, almost nobody ever advocates adding a 3770k to a gaming computer.

    8GB of RAM is all you will need. You don't lose anything by upping the amount (other than money, of course), but you gain essentially nothing in contemporary games.

    I'm glad we were able to help. :)



    Thanks for the quick reply on my cpu and ram questions. You all have been a great help. I think I have my final build here: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Edwad_/saved/1Bty


    My pleasure.

    The RAM you have there is too tall. With an air cooler, you want low profile RAM.
    Also, your PSU is quite large. Are you intending to add another card later?


    Ah that's why you suggested the Corsair Vengeance. I hadn't noticed that detail. thanks for pointing that out.

    I assume you mean a video card? Yes, I do intend on adding another one later. Are there also low-profile psu's I should be looking at as well? Thanks for bringing these things up. saving me some frustration in the future.



    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.
  13. Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Thank you all for your input I will definitely have to rethink the components I use in my machine. I will probably end up making a mix of all of your suggestions and whatever other advice I get in the near future before I make my final decision on what pieces to buy.

    I have a question though, it seems that everyone on this thread has suggested I change my cpu choice to an i5. I am curious why that is? Are i7's just not enough of an upgrade from the i5 to justify the higher price tag?

    Again thank you all for your time and advice.

    Edit:
    Also, is 8GB RAM plenty or should I consider 12 or 16gb? RAM seems to be MUCH cheaper than the last time I upgraded my current PC.


    The i3-3770k is almost literally not an upgrade from the i5-3570k. It runs 100mhz faster, and has something called "Hyperthreading". Other than that, no benefit. Since Hyperthreading doesn't benefit 99% of games, almost nobody ever advocates adding a 3770k to a gaming computer.

    8GB of RAM is all you will need. You don't lose anything by upping the amount (other than money, of course), but you gain essentially nothing in contemporary games.

    I'm glad we were able to help. :)



    Thanks for the quick reply on my cpu and ram questions. You all have been a great help. I think I have my final build here: http://pcpartpicker.com/user/Edwad_/saved/1Bty


    My pleasure.

    The RAM you have there is too tall. With an air cooler, you want low profile RAM.
    Also, your PSU is quite large. Are you intending to add another card later?


    Ah that's why you suggested the Corsair Vengeance. I hadn't noticed that detail. thanks for pointing that out.

    I assume you mean a video card? Yes, I do intend on adding another one later. Are there also low-profile psu's I should be looking at as well? Thanks for bringing these things up. saving me some frustration in the future.



    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.


    How much more? Should I go 900W? Larger?

    Is the 750 just barely cutting it for the build I have? I definitely do not want to skimp on power...I have made that mistake before. My intent with the psu is to have MORE than enough power to run two of these video cards, when I do decide to get the second.
  14. Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:


    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.


    How much more? Should I go 900W? Larger?

    Is the 750 just barely cutting it for the build I have? I definitely do not want to skimp on power...I have made that mistake before. My intent with the psu is to have MORE than enough power to run two of these video cards, when I do decide to get the second



    For my own dual-7970 Ghz. Edition (which used those very cards), I went with 1000w. This is primarily because I am completely paranoid when it comes to power requirements, and wanted as large a distance as possible (within reason) between what my system needed and what my PSU could handle. For your purposes, 850w-900W should be fine, unless you share my paranoia.

    The 750w is more than cutting it for your build, but you'd be running dangerously close to its limits (once again, to my paranoid mindset) with two 7970 Ghz. Editions.
  15. Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:


    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.


    How much more? Should I go 900W? Larger?

    Is the 750 just barely cutting it for the build I have? I definitely do not want to skimp on power...I have made that mistake before. My intent with the psu is to have MORE than enough power to run two of these video cards, when I do decide to get the second



    For my own dual-7970 Ghz. Edition (which used those very cards), I went with 1000w. This is primarily because I am completely paranoid when it comes to power requirements, and wanted as large a distance as possible (within reason) between what my system needed and what my PSU could handle. For your purposes, 850w-900W should be fine, unless you share my paranoia.

    The 750w is more than cutting it for your build, but you'd be running dangerously close to its limits (once again, to my paranoid mindset) with two 7970 Ghz. Editions.


    I think I will just stick with the 750 until I decide I want a second video card.
    I am quite paranoid about my power. I ruined a brand new video card because at the time I didn't even know about psu's I just figured "it plugs into the wall it gets all the power it needs". It was only after talking to a guy at a local shop about it and he showed me that you need to make sure your system is properly powered that I realized what happened. That was a long time ago and a lesson I will not forget.
  16. Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:


    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.


    How much more? Should I go 900W? Larger?

    Is the 750 just barely cutting it for the build I have? I definitely do not want to skimp on power...I have made that mistake before. My intent with the psu is to have MORE than enough power to run two of these video cards, when I do decide to get the second



    For my own dual-7970 Ghz. Edition (which used those very cards), I went with 1000w. This is primarily because I am completely paranoid when it comes to power requirements, and wanted as large a distance as possible (within reason) between what my system needed and what my PSU could handle. For your purposes, 850w-900W should be fine, unless you share my paranoia.

    The 750w is more than cutting it for your build, but you'd be running dangerously close to its limits (once again, to my paranoid mindset) with two 7970 Ghz. Editions.


    I think I will just stick with the 750 until I decide I want a second video card.
    I am quite paranoid about my power. I ruined a brand new video card because at the time I didn't even know about psu's I just figured "it plugs into the wall it gets all the power it needs". It was only after talking to a guy at a local shop about it and he showed me that you need to make sure your system is properly powered that I realized what happened. That was a long time ago and a lesson I will not forget.


    Ouch. I cringed just thinking about that. My father has been in computers for decades (he talks about the old days of room-sized computers), and he had a somewhat "scare em straight" view on how to teach good computer maintainance. End result: I am in constant fear of accidentally destroying my own computer, but I have never actually caused a single problem for my computer.
    On the PSU, the 750w should be fine. Heck, you could drop it down to the 600-650w range without risking anything.
  17. Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:


    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.


    How much more? Should I go 900W? Larger?

    Is the 750 just barely cutting it for the build I have? I definitely do not want to skimp on power...I have made that mistake before. My intent with the psu is to have MORE than enough power to run two of these video cards, when I do decide to get the second



    For my own dual-7970 Ghz. Edition (which used those very cards), I went with 1000w. This is primarily because I am completely paranoid when it comes to power requirements, and wanted as large a distance as possible (within reason) between what my system needed and what my PSU could handle. For your purposes, 850w-900W should be fine, unless you share my paranoia.

    The 750w is more than cutting it for your build, but you'd be running dangerously close to its limits (once again, to my paranoid mindset) with two 7970 Ghz. Editions.


    I think I will just stick with the 750 until I decide I want a second video card.
    I am quite paranoid about my power. I ruined a brand new video card because at the time I didn't even know about psu's I just figured "it plugs into the wall it gets all the power it needs". It was only after talking to a guy at a local shop about it and he showed me that you need to make sure your system is properly powered that I realized what happened. That was a long time ago and a lesson I will not forget.


    Ouch. I cringed just thinking about that. My father has been in computers for decades (he talks about the old days of room-sized computers), and he had a somewhat "scare em straight" view on how to teach good computer maintainance. End result: I am in constant fear of accidentally destroying my own computer, but I have never actually caused a single problem for my computer.
    On the PSU, the 750w should be fine. Heck, you could drop it down to the 600-650w range without risking anything.


    Yeah, I have had to learn everything about PC's the hard way.

    Hmmm, maybe I don't need a new psu at all then. I have a Corsair GS600 in my current PC that I was going to sell.
    I might feel better with the extra power though and also, I was planning to get a modular psu to reduce the clutter in my case.
  18. Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:


    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.


    How much more? Should I go 900W? Larger?

    Is the 750 just barely cutting it for the build I have? I definitely do not want to skimp on power...I have made that mistake before. My intent with the psu is to have MORE than enough power to run two of these video cards, when I do decide to get the second



    For my own dual-7970 Ghz. Edition (which used those very cards), I went with 1000w. This is primarily because I am completely paranoid when it comes to power requirements, and wanted as large a distance as possible (within reason) between what my system needed and what my PSU could handle. For your purposes, 850w-900W should be fine, unless you share my paranoia.

    The 750w is more than cutting it for your build, but you'd be running dangerously close to its limits (once again, to my paranoid mindset) with two 7970 Ghz. Editions.


    I think I will just stick with the 750 until I decide I want a second video card.
    I am quite paranoid about my power. I ruined a brand new video card because at the time I didn't even know about psu's I just figured "it plugs into the wall it gets all the power it needs". It was only after talking to a guy at a local shop about it and he showed me that you need to make sure your system is properly powered that I realized what happened. That was a long time ago and a lesson I will not forget.


    Ouch. I cringed just thinking about that. My father has been in computers for decades (he talks about the old days of room-sized computers), and he had a somewhat "scare em straight" view on how to teach good computer maintainance. End result: I am in constant fear of accidentally destroying my own computer, but I have never actually caused a single problem for my computer.
    On the PSU, the 750w should be fine. Heck, you could drop it down to the 600-650w range without risking anything.


    Yeah, I have had to learn everything about PC's the hard way.

    Hmmm, maybe I don't need a new psu at all then. I have a Corsair GS600 in my current PC that I was going to sell.
    I might feel better with the extra power though and also, I was planning to get a modular psu to reduce the clutter in my case.


    I don't have a lot of love for Corsair as a PSU brand, with the exception of the PSUs manufactured by SeaSonic. I'm afraid that I don't recall whether the GS600 is one of them, but I don't believe that it is.
  19. Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:
    Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:


    Yup. Also, it looks nice. G.Skill makes quite good RAM as well, but I've always found it a bit of an eyesore.

    Ah. In that case, you should probably go for a slightly larger PSU. 7970s are power hungry cards. There is, to my knowledge, no such thing as a low profile PSU, though if SeaSonic made one I'm sure this forum would go mad with joy (SeaSonic and low profile being their favourite words). A PSU will not cause you trouble in this regard.


    How much more? Should I go 900W? Larger?

    Is the 750 just barely cutting it for the build I have? I definitely do not want to skimp on power...I have made that mistake before. My intent with the psu is to have MORE than enough power to run two of these video cards, when I do decide to get the second



    For my own dual-7970 Ghz. Edition (which used those very cards), I went with 1000w. This is primarily because I am completely paranoid when it comes to power requirements, and wanted as large a distance as possible (within reason) between what my system needed and what my PSU could handle. For your purposes, 850w-900W should be fine, unless you share my paranoia.

    The 750w is more than cutting it for your build, but you'd be running dangerously close to its limits (once again, to my paranoid mindset) with two 7970 Ghz. Editions.


    I think I will just stick with the 750 until I decide I want a second video card.
    I am quite paranoid about my power. I ruined a brand new video card because at the time I didn't even know about psu's I just figured "it plugs into the wall it gets all the power it needs". It was only after talking to a guy at a local shop about it and he showed me that you need to make sure your system is properly powered that I realized what happened. That was a long time ago and a lesson I will not forget.


    Ouch. I cringed just thinking about that. My father has been in computers for decades (he talks about the old days of room-sized computers), and he had a somewhat "scare em straight" view on how to teach good computer maintainance. End result: I am in constant fear of accidentally destroying my own computer, but I have never actually caused a single problem for my computer.
    On the PSU, the 750w should be fine. Heck, you could drop it down to the 600-650w range without risking anything.


    Yeah, I have had to learn everything about PC's the hard way.

    Hmmm, maybe I don't need a new psu at all then. I have a Corsair GS600 in my current PC that I was going to sell.
    I might feel better with the extra power though and also, I was planning to get a modular psu to reduce the clutter in my case.


    I don't have a lot of love for Corsair as a PSU brand, with the exception of the PSUs manufactured by SeaSonic. I'm afraid that I don't recall whether the GS600 is one of them, but I don't believe that it is.


    I'm going to go with the SeaSonic M12II 750W. I have seen nothing but good reviews for the brand.
  20. Eddie87 said:
    Jack Revenant said:

    I don't have a lot of love for Corsair as a PSU brand, with the exception of the PSUs manufactured by SeaSonic. I'm afraid that I don't recall whether the GS600 is one of them, but I don't believe that it is.


    I'm going to go with the SeaSonic M12II 750W. I have seen nothing but good reviews for the brand.


    It's hard to find anything other than good reviews for SeaSonic. They charge a premium, but they make the premium product.
Ask a new question

Read More

Gaming Homebuilt