Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

2500k Overlocked 4.5ghz

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
May 16, 2013 3:09:25 AM

I am new to overclocking so I have some a weird question. I just recently overclocked my Intel 2500k to 4.5Ghz and my motherboard is a ASUS P8Z68 . At idle my multiplier goes back down to 16 and it goes back up to 45 while I do prime 95 and Intel Burn Test. But I noticed that my multiplier stayed at 16 while gaming. I am just wondering if I did something wrong or that the games just don't stress the CPU hard enough for the multiplier to go back up.

More about : 2500k overlocked 5ghz

a b K Overclocking
a b å Intel
May 16, 2013 3:23:38 AM

Games just don't stress it hard enough likely.
m
0
l
a c 242 K Overclocking
May 16, 2013 4:53:34 AM

provided that for the game smoothly and more improved than ever before, it means the successful
m
0
l
Related resources

Best solution

May 16, 2013 4:57:00 AM

it is just the intel speedstep down clocking the cpu when you don't need the extra speed. I heard a great analogy on toms before, "you would not want your car to idle at max rpm's at a stop light" this extends the life of your cpu, reduces heat and saves energy.
About intel speedstep
you can disable this in the bios.
Share
a b K Overclocking
May 17, 2013 9:47:21 AM

Please do yourself a favor and disabled Intel Speedstep, Turbo Boost, and all C-States. It's a MUST for overclocking

People sometimes say "why would you want your CPU to be at 4.5Ghz all the time? That's bad for it.". But when you think about it, why would you want your PC to rev up and down and up and down all the time. Thousands of times a day. Isn't that bad for it too?

Think about it this way. If you gaming or using a program, and that game or programs sends a command to the CPU. The CPU is starting off a 1600mhz and has to adjust to 4500mhz every time it serves a command after being in the idle states. This takes time, and thus you may loose a little performance even though this is not proven.

The main proven reason people disable EIST, is stability. Everyone I know agrees that disabling EIST(Intel Speedstep)helps with stability when overclocking for obvious reasons. The reason is, is that your CPU isn't going up and down all the time thus easier to keep it stable. And you can actually have a stable overclock with less voltage with EIST disabled, which results in lower temps and therefore maybe a longer lifespan. So in reality it may help your lifespan, not hurt it like some say.

My friend owns a business selling gaming computers. And he overclocks every PC he sells to 4.5Ghz(All Intel PC's, either 3570k or 3770k). And he disables EIST on every single one of them while still giving a 3 year warranty with his PC's. So if this hurt it's lifespan he wouldn't be doing it. And he's built at least 400 of these computers so far. Including my own. Although since then I've rebuilt it into a different case.



Btw, another great tip I have for you that has something to do with what we're talking about is Core Parking. You need to disable Core Parking. Core Parking parks(disables) all but one of your four cores while the CPU is doing small-medium tasks or doing nothing. And when it really needs all the cores, it enables them. The problem here is that it takes time to turn cores on and off. And Core Parking has to decide whether to unpark 2-3-4 cores. Many people say that Core Parking causes frame rate drops in games because the game trys to use all four cores but they are turned off, then the frame rate drops until they get turned on. It also causes stuttering in programs and could postpone startups for a split second.

The benefit of disabling Core Parking is that instead of trying to pile multiple tasks onto one core, while the other three are parked, now with it disabled the tasks can run evenly across all four cores all the time resulting in better performance. And the stuttering and dropped frames will be gone too. This sounds a lot better doesn't it? Being able to use your QUAD core CPU like a QUAD core CPU.

EIST and Core Parking were designed mainly for laptops. To save battery life and such. Any hard core gamer, enthusiast, over clocker or power user should disabled Core Parking at least and over clockers should disabled EIST as well.

There's obviously different opinions on the matter. All I know, is that many people agree that when your overclocking disabling EIST is the best way to go. So disabling EIST is normally the rule, and keeping it enabled is the exception to the rule. Which would you want to be?

Edit* To disable Core Parking you can do so two ways. One is to use registry edits, which I don't know how to do but you can find out how on the web. Another, the way I do it, is to download "Park Control". It allows you to disable Core Parking completely or to disabled it and enabled it depending on the power profile you choose. So on my laptop I have is disabled when plugged in and enabled when on battery. Once you have disabled it through this program you can close the program and never open it again. You can even delete the program and it'll stay disabled. So to me, this is the easier way.
m
0
l
May 17, 2013 6:28:11 PM

ericjohn004 said:
Please do yourself a favor and disabled Intel Speedstep, Turbo Boost, and all C-States. It's a MUST for overclocking

People sometimes say "why would you want your CPU to be at 4.5Ghz all the time? That's bad for it.". But when you think about it, why would you want your PC to rev up and down and up and down all the time. Thousands of times a day. Isn't that bad for it too?

Think about it this way. If you gaming or using a program, and that game or programs sends a command to the CPU. The CPU is starting off a 1600mhz and has to adjust to 4500mhz every time it serves a command after being in the idle states. This takes time, and thus you may loose a little performance even though this is not proven.

The main proven reason people disable EIST, is stability. Everyone I know agrees that disabling EIST(Intel Speedstep)helps with stability when overclocking for obvious reasons. The reason is, is that your CPU isn't going up and down all the time thus easier to keep it stable. And you can actually have a stable overclock with less voltage with EIST disabled, which results in lower temps and therefore maybe a longer lifespan. So in reality it may help your lifespan, not hurt it like some say.

My friend owns a business selling gaming computers. And he overclocks every PC he sells to 4.5Ghz(All Intel PC's, either 3570k or 3770k). And he disables EIST on every single one of them while still giving a 3 year warranty with his PC's. So if this hurt it's lifespan he wouldn't be doing it. And he's built at least 400 of these computers so far. Including my own. Although since then I've rebuilt it into a different case.



Btw, another great tip I have for you that has something to do with what we're talking about is Core Parking. You need to disable Core Parking. Core Parking parks(disables) all but one of your four cores while the CPU is doing small-medium tasks or doing nothing. And when it really needs all the cores, it enables them. The problem here is that it takes time to turn cores on and off. And Core Parking has to decide whether to unpark 2-3-4 cores. Many people say that Core Parking causes frame rate drops in games because the game trys to use all four cores but they are turned off, then the frame rate drops until they get turned on. It also causes stuttering in programs and could postpone startups for a split second.

The benefit of disabling Core Parking is that instead of trying to pile multiple tasks onto one core, while the other three are parked, now with it disabled the tasks can run evenly across all four cores all the time resulting in better performance. And the stuttering and dropped frames will be gone too. This sounds a lot better doesn't it? Being able to use your QUAD core CPU like a QUAD core CPU.

EIST and Core Parking were designed mainly for laptops. To save battery life and such. Any hard core gamer, enthusiast, over clocker or power user should disabled Core Parking at least and over clockers should disabled EIST as well.

There's obviously different opinions on the matter. All I know, is that many people agree that when your overclocking disabling EIST is the best way to go. So disabling EIST is normally the rule, and keeping it enabled is the exception to the rule. Which would you want to be?

Edit* To disable Core Parking you can do so two ways. One is to use registry edits, which I don't know how to do but you can find out how on the web. Another, the way I do it, is to download "Park Control". It allows you to disable Core Parking completely or to disabled it and enabled it depending on the power profile you choose. So on my laptop I have is disabled when plugged in and enabled when on battery. Once you have disabled it through this program you can close the program and never open it again. You can even delete the program and it'll stay disabled. So to me, this is the easier way.


I will look into that, also my processor is clocking up, i just didn't notice it because when i minimized the game it must of down-clocked itself. But right now I am having a problem with the sleep/hibernation mode, it started ever since I OCed my CPU. I am forced to hard boot my PC and when I do I get to this screen and the header is: Windows Resume Loader. Under that is says " Your system's firmware did not preserve the system memory map across the hibernate transition. If you proceed with resume, your system could behave in an unexpected manner after resume completes. It is recommended that you save all your data and reboot the system after resume finishes. Kindly check for a firmware update with your system vendor as it may fix this problem." with the choices of: Continue with system resume and Delete restoration data and proceed to system boot menu. Where click the 2nd option to get the the desktop.
m
0
l
a b K Overclocking
May 17, 2013 6:59:23 PM

Hmm, IDK what that's about. I've never had it happen to me personally. Hopefully someone that knows about this can help you out.

I did want to mention something though. Open Windows task manager, click on the performance tab, then click on resource monitor, then click on the CPU tab. If you have a 3570k, then down the right side of this page you will see the load on all four of your cores. You will notice that some of them have a percentage of use, while most of them say "Parked". This is one way to check to see if you have disabled core parking.

Check this out. When I noticed this I thought "Oh hell no, I don't want my freaking CPU running like a single core processor" and I downloaded Park Control and disabled that crap. I tell you this because usually unless someone sees it for themselves they normally don't care. If you actually look at this you'll see that while performing numerous different tasks, windows keeps only 1 or 2 cores of available resources. It's really quite a bad thing for a desktop. Even for my laptop I disable it when plugged in.

Good luck on that other problem your having. Let me know if you disable EIST or Core Parking
m
0
l
!