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Starting a small PC repair business

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May 16, 2013 8:10:42 PM

If one was planning to start a PC repair business locally, would any legal documents need to be made to protect the one doing the repairs, or are they safe just making their own business plan and going from there? I'm just thinking, say you fix something and then something else goes wrong. The customer blames you for this new expensive part being destroyed and wants their money back when it wasn't your fault. What do you do?

Also, I realize this probably isn't the correct section to put this in, or maybe even the right forum. I figured I'd ask anyways as I'm sure a few here have done this at some point. Thanks in advanced.
May 16, 2013 8:25:47 PM

hotelmariofan said:
If one was planning to start a PC repair business locally, would any legal documents need to be made to protect the one doing the repairs, or are they safe just making their own business plan and going from there? I'm just thinking, say you fix something and then something else goes wrong. The customer blames you for this new expensive part being destroyed and wants their money back when it wasn't your fault. What do you do?

Also, I realize this probably isn't the correct section to put this in, or maybe even the right forum. I figured I'd ask anyways as I'm sure a few here have done this at some point. Thanks in advanced.


Where do you live? Different countries and states have different laws regarding businesses.

May 16, 2013 8:31:54 PM

One Cool Cow said:
hotelmariofan said:
If one was planning to start a PC repair business locally, would any legal documents need to be made to protect the one doing the repairs, or are they safe just making their own business plan and going from there? I'm just thinking, say you fix something and then something else goes wrong. The customer blames you for this new expensive part being destroyed and wants their money back when it wasn't your fault. What do you do?

Also, I realize this probably isn't the correct section to put this in, or maybe even the right forum. I figured I'd ask anyways as I'm sure a few here have done this at some point. Thanks in advanced.


Where do you live? Different countries and states have different laws regarding businesses.



Ah, forgot to mention that. I reside in Missouri of the US.
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May 16, 2013 8:37:32 PM

hotelmariofan said:
One Cool Cow said:
hotelmariofan said:
If one was planning to start a PC repair business locally, would any legal documents need to be made to protect the one doing the repairs, or are they safe just making their own business plan and going from there? I'm just thinking, say you fix something and then something else goes wrong. The customer blames you for this new expensive part being destroyed and wants their money back when it wasn't your fault. What do you do?

Also, I realize this probably isn't the correct section to put this in, or maybe even the right forum. I figured I'd ask anyways as I'm sure a few here have done this at some point. Thanks in advanced.


Where do you live? Different countries and states have different laws regarding businesses.



Ah, forgot to mention that. I reside in Missouri of the US.

I'm not a lawyer by any means but you might be able to make an agreement that can be signed by the customer that accepts that any damages occurring not affected by your work you will not be liable for etc. Also I think that you could probably look up something like that on your state website, and possibly you might need a permit to do business in your state. I am not familiar with Missouri's laws but I imagine that it would be possible for you to protect yourself from the situation you described.

Just with a little looking around I found this http://business.mo.gov/ I haven't read any of them but if you were to be starting a business reading these would probably be important.
May 16, 2013 10:39:28 PM

You can be sued by anyone for anything. So even if they sign some type of agreement they can still sue you. They may have legal grounds to sue you or they may not. Either way you would still likely need a lawyer to properly defend yourself. Their are many companies that offer insurance for that sort of situation.

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May 17, 2013 7:07:07 AM
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I own a small computer repair business in Kansas, so I know what you are talking about. Really, there is no 100% protection from this kind of issue. At our office (and the majority of other small repair businesses that I know) there is a waiver form or agreement that customers must sign that states that we are in possession to address or fix the specific issues described, and are not responsible for any other failures or faults that occur which are not direct results of our work. After all, hard drives and power supplies do just randomly die.

However, that being said, if anyone wanted to go after us they will. It is then our job to get legal representation and prove to the best of our abilities that the damage was not caused in any way by our work. So far this has never happened to me at my office *knock on wood* but it's possible.

My recommendation is before you start up your business, talk with a lawyer. They will know what you need to do to help protect yourself best. In my case I formed an LLC to help out with protecting myself personally and keep the business operating professionally. I recommend something like this even though it takes a little more work to sort out and run than a Sole Proprietorship does. Also, you should talk with a business insurance agency to see what coverages they might have for you. You would be surprised how much this can help and also how little it might cost. Be very careful, though, as most of the time computer-related faults (such as loss of data or accidental damage to computer property that is not your own) is not covered under the standard business insurance policy. I had to purchase an additional policy for this myself, called Data Omissions and Errors policy, which covers those extra liabilities.
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